Number of Children Who Visit ER Due to Suicidal Thoughts Is Rising at a Shocking Pace

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More and more kids are visiting the emergency room for both attempted suicide and suicidal thoughts. According to a new study published on Monday, the number of suicide-related ER visits for children and teens ages five to 18 has nearly doubled since 2007, up from 580,000 to almost 1.2 million in 2015.

“The numbers are very alarming,” Dr. Brett Burstein, lead study author and a pediatric ER doctor at Montreal Children’s Hospital of McGill University Health Centre, told FOX 8, adding, “It also represents a larger percentage of all pediatric emergency department visits. Where suicidal behavior among the pediatric population was just 2 percent of all visits, that’s now up to 3.5 percent.”

The study, which appeared in JAMA Pediatrics, used data from the annual National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey run by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Researchers analyzed children and teens from 300 emergency rooms across the country who were diagnosed with suicidal thoughts or suicide attempts.

In addition to the rising rate of visits, they found that the average age admitted was 13 years old and that almost half of the visits (43 percent) were for children between the ages of five and 11.

This came on the heels of a similar study published in the American Academy of Pediatrics’ journal, Pediatrics, which found that the number of young people visiting the emergency room due to “psychiatric reasons” between 2011 and 2015 was up nearly 28 percent. And in March, another national study revealed that the rate of depression among children and teens had increased over 60 percent since 2009.

The results have many medical professionals calling for improved mental healthcare for children moving forward. In Monday’s research letter, study authors explain that there is “a critical need to augment community mental health resources, ED physician preparedness, and post-emergency department risk reduction initiatives to decrease the burden of suicide among children.”

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Source: https://www.fatherly.com/news/number-emergency-room-visits-kids-suicide-doubled/

 

 

 

Mental Health and Suicide: Could it be Unrelated? — journey to hope and healing

Someone brought up a very interesting point here. Can someone commit suicide and not have depression, mental illnesses, not addiction related, or any of the other stereotypes involved with suicide? There have been so much suicide in the news recently. The CDC states that suicide is on the rise. Two well known celebrities, Kate Spade […]

via Mental Health and Suicide: Could it be Unrelated? — journey to hope and healing

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Living Empathy, Active Listening are Keys To Understanding Those Thinking of Suicide – Carolina Living

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Suicide is a tough topic. It has been in the headlines recently with the passing of Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade. The topic has spurred much debate on mental health awareness and reform. I understand it is a sensitive issue and challenging for many to talk about.

However, I am not one to shy away from a challenge. Recent figures from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention list suicide as the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. 44,965 Americans pass away from suicide each year. The state of North Carolina accounts for 1,373 of those deaths, making our state 38th in the national ranking.

Being we are in a military community, the harrowing figure released by Veterans Affairs states veterans are at a 22 percent higher risk for dying by suicide than non-veteran adults. I also want to make note of this since “Raising Healthy Minds” primarily focuses on youth, suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death for individuals 15 to 34 here in NC. What can we do individually and as a community to help prevent this tragedy?

While there is no convenient solution, there are attainable ones. The main point to drive home is that suicide is the final symptom in depression and other mental health struggles. It should not be thought of as a selfish or attention-seeking act. People who die from suicide typically feel isolated, overwhelmed or like they are out of options.

A myriad of factors including past mental health history, access to treatment and amount of support all contribute to whether someone may succumb to it. To help you be able to identify if someone may be at risk, here are a few warning signs:

  • Visiting or calling people to say goodbye
  • Giving away prized possessions
  • Withdrawing from activities
  • Isolating from family and friends
  • Talking about feeling trapped or hopeless
  • Searching for methods through print or online

People can be very good at hiding these symptoms and putting on a happy mask. These symptoms can often linger on for months or years before a person actually starts planning to take their life. However, taking time to really be observant and have deep conversations with those you see are struggling can bring their true thoughts and feelings to light. Listen and do not insert your opinions or advice.

Let them reveal what is going on and then start to guide them to resources that can help. Suicide is a very serious mental health concern and reporting it can lead to a person being hospitalized Only take immediate action such as calling 911 or other emergency services if you suspect the person has immediate plans. If you do, however, do not hesitate to act. You could save a life.

The good news is that treatment is available. Cognitive behavioral therapy, medications and rehabilitation from any substance abuse are all some ways suicidal thoughts and ideations can be addressed and resolved. While the road to recovery can be long, it is reachable. Together, we can address and overcome this horrible phenomenon.

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Anthony Bourdain, Kate Spade And The Question Of Why – Henna Inam

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The question “why?” has been reverberating through my head.

This week, many of us experienced a stunned sadness. The suicides of two celebrities, Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade, left us wondering what happened. What did we miss?

The Bourdain and Spade suicides have opened up new questions about my assumptions about dream careers.

Bourdain and Spade had achieved significant success. They were at the top of their fields. They were engaged in work that they were passionate about.

They had fame. They had fortune.

 They had somehow figured out their unique talents and were fully expressing them to create positive impact for so many.

They had family and friends who loved them and fans who adored them.

The place they reached is the place many of us aspire to. For many of us, isn’t the dream to find our passion? To connect with our talents? To live our passions out loud? To impact others positively? To love and be loved? To find work that is not just a paycheck but fills us? Isn’t this what self-actualization is about? I imagine nirvana lives just on the other side of self-actualization. Does it?

At the height of what seemed on the outside were enviable lives well lived, Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain chose to end it all.

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I am not a mental health expert. I can’t even begin to fathom what was going through their minds when they made the decision to leave. But, here are some questions that are going through my mind this week. I urge us to reflect on these questions as we go about pursuing our dream careers:

Most of us assume that we will be happy when (fill in the blank). The fill in the blank can be the next achievement, the corner office, the success of the side gig, the perfect partner. What if we will not be happy “when”?

I imagine both Bourdain and Spade experienced some sense of emptiness or despair. As we go about pursuing dreams important to us, what are the just-beneath-the-surface moments of emptiness we feel? What is the emptiness we avoid? What do we seek on the outside to fill that emptiness?

Suicide rates have increased by 25% in the last 20 years. Almost always, loved ones are surprised. Who are the people that we can reach out to help us when we feel despair? Who are the people in our lives we can reach out to, to be of help? What are the signs we need to be aware of?

There is still too much shame around mental health issues. How do we as a society and as individuals stop hiding behind masks of perfect Facebook-worthy lives? How do we acknowledge our humanity to others in a vulnerable way? How do we create the space for others to share what’s not perfect in their lives?

What is the cost to us of creating a public persona that is all about the positive? Success. Fun. Fame. Adventure. How painful and lonely must be the discord between the real experience of emptiness and the image of fullness that we feel we must display to the world.

What if our assumptions about the pursuit of the dream that will ultimately make us happy and successful are wrong? What if there is a dark underbelly of the human experience in each of us that we’re missing as we seek self-actualization? What would it be like to claim that dark underbelly? To accept that we are each flawed and that may never change? To accept that there is less within our control than we would like to accept?

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Would our dreams be different if they emerged from an acknowledgment of our imperfections and most painful emotions?

I imagine that each one of us will have different answers to these questions. I leave you with a quote from Bourdain in celebration of being curious: “That without experimentation, a willingness to ask questions and try new things, we shall surely become static, repetitive, moribund.”

What are the questions you have as you process the passing of Bourdain and Spade? I welcome your thoughts and reflections.

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