The One Metabolism-Boosting Drink That Basically Flushes Belly Fat, According To Nutritionists

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One of the most difficult places to burn fat is around the midsection. A combination of factors that include aging, having a slower metabolism, not exercising enough, and not eating enough of the right fat-burning foods all contribute to make it a challenge to lose stubborn belly fat.

But all hope is not lost. By focusing on your diet (because flat abs are made in the kitchen, as the saying goes) you’ll feel more in control of your fat-burning goals and will maintain high levels of energy while burning more fat.

And don’t forget about drinks when you’re concentrating on food. In order to boost your metabolism, it’s important to eat plenty of protein-rich foods, drink water, exercise (cardio and strength training are necessary), get to sleep on time at night, and keep stress to a minimum.

If that sounds like a tall order, don’t despair. There are little short cuts you can take here and there to help further things along, including incorporating this metabolism-boosting drink into your everyday regimen.

Ginger And Lemon Water

The benefits of drinking lemon water, especially in the morning, have been praised for a while now, thanks to lemon’s ability to act as a natural detox food that cleanse your system. Ginger is also a digestive dynamo — one that can decrease bloating and help you burn belly fat.

Add them together and you’ve basically got the best metabolism-boosting drink ever created. As it turns out, nutritionists are already hip to the fact that ginger and lemon are a winning  combination.” Associating ginger with lemon means having a lot more flavor in a blend rich in vitamin C, low calorie and antioxidant, “Nutritionist Paula dos Santos Ribeiro told Vix.

And, according to Emily Kyle, MS, RDN, CDN, CLT, HCP, this drink works precisely because it’s not a one-ingredient concoction that promises the sun, moon, stars, and a flat stomach. Kyle says: “…one single ingredient or one single recipe does not have the magical healing abilities to make you feel better or shed excessive amounts of weight without making other positive holistic lifestyle changes.”

Instead of choosing lemon and ginger to help burn fat, Kyle says she discovered the magic of this drink when fighting off a bad cold one day. When tea failed to provide soothing relief, her lemon and ginger recipe picked up the slack. The expert says ginger lemon tea has numerous benefits that include fighting infections, reducing nausea, and providing anti-inflammatory properties that can combat inflammation in the body that leads to obesity and disease.

Kyle opts to include anti-inflammatory honey in her drink to naturally sweeten things up. Her Honey & Ginger Warm Lemon Water recipe is among the best you’ll find — and it’s so simple to make.

You’ll need the following ingredients:

Organic lemon

Fresh ginger

Raw or local honey

Boiling water

Remember: there are no magical elixirs when it comes to burning belly fat. Lemon and ginger water will certainly help keep you healthy and will support you as you make other life changes, but it can’t do anything all by itself.

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Other tips to losing belly fat (that are backed by science, reports Healthline) include eating plenty of soluble fiber, avoid foods that have trans fats, keeping alcohol consumption to a minimum, and getting in plenty of cardio.

Source: The One Metabolism-Boosting Drink That Basically Flushes Belly Fat, According To Nutritionists

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How to deal with that extra pound around the waist? We’ve found a simple way to lose belly fat in a single night. No more dieting, no more improve metabolism – meet a magical bedtime drink! How to deal with that extra pound around the waist? What to do to remove toxins from your body? How to improve metabolism and become more energetic? We’ve found a perfect solution to all of these problems.

TIMESTAMPS Introduction 0:15 Why excess weight is harmful to health 1:25 Help your body to detox 2:35 Other benefits of this drink 3:40 Ingredients you’ll need to prepare the drink 4:03 A lemon 4:16 A cucumber 5:05 Ginger 5:55 Aloe Vera Juice 6:34 A bunch of parsley 7:02 How to make it 7:54 SUMMARY – We will tell you a recipe for a detoxing drink that will rid you of this stubborn belly fat within one week! Not only is it healthy and effective, but it is also delicious! What is more, it is easy to prepare: just put all the ingredients in a blender and press the button!

And if you combine taking this drink on a regular basis and doing the exercise known as a vacuum pose – get ready for a miracle! The drink will work on removing the excess of water from your body, and the exercise will sculpt the shape of your stomach. – Put all the products into a blender, and grind them at high speed. You can stop when you have homogeneous juice inside the bowl. Drink it before going to bed, and already in a few days, you will start to notice the changes occurring in your body. Better complexion, energy flow, and of course, disappearing inches around your waist will be your reward!

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Exercise Can’t Save Us: Our Sugar Intake Is The Real Culprit, Say Experts

LEIPZIG, GERMANY - MAY 23: A man with a large belly eats junk food on May 23, 2013 in Leipzig, Germany. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images

In a fascinating and scorching editorial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, three authors argue that the myth that exercise is the key to weight loss – and to health – is erroneous and pervasive, and that it must end. The evidence that diet matters more than exercise is now overwhelming, they write, and has got to be heeded: We can exercise to the moon and back but still be fat for all the sugar and carbs we consume. And perhaps even more jarring is that we can be a normal weight and exercise, and still be unhealthy if we’re eating poorly. So, they say, we need a basic reboot of our understanding of health, which has to involve the food industry’s powerful PR “machinery,” since that was part of the problem to begin with.

The major point the team makes – which they say the public doesn’t really understand – is that exercise in and of itself doesn’t really lead to weight loss. It may lead to a number of excellent health effects, but weight loss – if you’re not also restricting calories – isn’t one of them. “Regular physical activity reduces the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dementia and some cancers by at least 30%,” they write. “However, physical activity does not promote weight loss.”

Plus, in the last 30 years, exercise has stayed about the same, while overweight and obesity have skyrocketed. So something else must be at play – like the type of food we’re eating. That part has gotten steadily worse over the years, as highly-processed sugary foods and sodas have taken over as our go-to choices. “According to the Lancet global burden of disease reports,” they write, “poor diet now generates more disease than physical inactivity, alcohol and smoking combined.” This is a disturbing statistic. But it gets worse.

The related and larger issue is that even normal weight people who exercise will, if they eat poorly, have metabolic markers that put them at very high risk of chronic illness and early mortality. “Up to 40% of those with a normal body mass index will harbour metabolic abnormalities typically associated with obesity, which include hypertension, dyslipidaemia, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cardiovascular disease.”

And the crux of the issue is this: We’re continually “fed” the idea that all that’s behind the rise in obesity is lack of exercise, or sedentariness. There have certainly been a lot of studies and popular articles suggesting that sitting is our downfall. Instead of effective messages about diet and health that science actually knows to be true, “members of the public are drowned by an unhelpful message about maintaining a ‘healthy weight’ through calorie counting,” the team writes, “and many still wrongly believe that obesity is entirely due to lack of exercise. This false perception is rooted in the Food Industry’s Public Relations machinery, which uses tactics chillingly similar to those of big tobacco.”

What we know to be true is much simpler: “Sugar calories promote fat storage and hunger,” the write. “Fat calories induce fullness or satiation.” For every additional 150 calories in sugar (i.e., a can of soda) a person consumes per day, the risk for diabetes rises 11-fold, regardless of how much or little we exercise. The single most effective thing people can do for their weight, they write, is to restrict calories – and even more, restrict carbohydrates.

So if this is all true, and research seems to suggest it is, how will it change? It might take quite a lot of work to shift our psychology around food, especially since advertising is so saturated with the message that carbohydrates are good for us. The celebrity endorsements might need to be tweaked, the authors say, and certainly the way foods are advertised and, perhaps, created, need to be shifted. The public should be repeatedly hit with the message that whole, natural foods, where possible and affordable is the best way to go. If you’re trying to lose weight, reduce your calories (especially sugars) – don’t think exercise alone will cut it. And even if you’re normal weight, you can’t subside solely on junk and stay healthy.

The authors end with this powerful finale: “It is time to wind back the harms caused by the junk food industry’s Public Relations machinery. Let us bust the myth of physical inactivity and obesity. You cannot outrun a bad diet.”

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Source: Exercise Can’t Save Us: Our Sugar Intake Is The Real Culprit, Say Experts

The Dangers of Belly Fat – Jane E. Brody

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If you do nothing else today to protect your health, consider taking an honest measurement of your waist. Stand up straight, exhale (no sucking in that gut!) and with a soft tape measure record your girth an inch or two above your hip bones.

The result has far greater implications than any concerns you might have about how you look or how your clothes fit. In general, if your waist measures 35 or more inches for women or 40 or more inches for men, chances are you’re harboring a potentially dangerous amount of abdominal fat.

Subcutaneous fat that lurks beneath the skin as “love handles” or padding on the thighs, buttocks or upper arms may be cosmetically challenging, but it is otherwise harmless. However, the deeper belly fat — the visceral fat that accumulates around abdominal organs — is metabolically active and has been strongly linked to a host of serious disease risks, including heart disease, cancer and dementia.

You don’t even have to be overweight or obese to face these hazards if you harbor excess fat inside your abdomen. Even people of normal weight can accumulate harmful amounts of hidden fat beneath the abdominal wall. Furthermore, this is not fat you can shed simply by toning up abdominal muscles with exercises like situps. Weight loss through a wholesome diet and exercise — activities like walking and strength-training — is the only surefire way to get rid of it.

Until midlife, men usually harbor a greater percentage of visceral fat than women do, but the pattern usually reverses as women pass through menopause. Few females seem to escape a midlife waistline expansion as body fat redistributes and visceral fat pushes out our bellies. Even though in my eighth decade I weigh less than I did at age 13, my waist is many inches bigger.

Here’s why visceral fat cells are so important to your well-being. Unlike the cells in subcutaneous fat, visceral fat is essentially an endocrine organ that secretes hormones and a host of other chemicals linked to diseases that commonly afflict older adults. One such substance is called retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) that was found in a 16-year study of nurses to increase the risk of developing coronary heart disease. This hazard most likely results from the harmful effects of this protein on insulin resistance, the precursor to Type 2 diabetes, and development of the metabolic syndrome, a complex of cardiac risk factors.

The Million Women Study conducted in Britain demonstrated a direct link between the development of coronary heart disease and an increase in waist circumference over a 20-year period. Even when other coronary risk factors were taken into account, the chances of developing heart disease were doubled among the women with the largest waists. Every additional two inches in the women’s waist size raised their risk by 10 percent.

Cancer risk is also raised by belly fat. The chances of getting colorectal cancer were nearly doubled among postmenopausal women who accumulate visceral fat, a Korean study found. Breast cancer risk increases as well. In a study of more than 3,000 premenopausal and postmenopausal women in Mumbai, India, those whose waists were nearly as big as their hips faced a three- to four-times greater risk of getting a breast cancer diagnosis than normal-weight women.

A Dutch study published last year linked both total body fat and abdominal fat to a raised risk of breast cancer. When the women in the study lost weight — about 12 pounds on average — changes in biomarkers for breast cancer, like estrogen, leptin and inflammatory proteins, indicated a reduction in breast cancer risk.

Given that two-thirds of American women are overweight or obese, weight loss may well be the single best weapon for lowering the high incidence of breast cancer in this country.

Perhaps most important with regard to the toll on individuals, families and the health care system is the link between abdominal obesity and risk of developing dementia decades later. A study of 6,583 members of Kaiser Permanente of Northern California who were followed for an average of 36 years found that those with the greatest amount of abdominal obesity in midlife were nearly three times more likely to develop dementia three decades later than those with the least abdominal fat.

Having a large abdomen raised dementia risk in the women even if they were of normal weight overall and lacked other health risks related to dementia like heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

Among other medical problems linked to abdominal fat are insulin resistance and the risk of Type 2 diabetes, compromised lung function and migraine headaches. Even asthma risk is raised by being overweight and especially by abdominal obesity, a study of 88,000 California teachers found.

Over all, according to findings among more than 350,000 European men and women published in The New England Journal of Medicine, having a large waist can nearly double one’s risk of dying prematurely even if overall body weight is normal.

All of which raises the question: How best to shed abdominal fat and, even more important, how to avoid accumulating it in the first place?

Chances are you’ve periodically seen ads on the internet for seemingly magical ways to reduce belly fat. Before you throw good money after bad, let it be said that no pill or potion has been scientifically shown to dissolve abdominal fat. You have to work at it. And that means avoiding or drastically limiting certain substances in your diet, controlling overall caloric intake and engaging in exercise that burns calories.

Perhaps the worst offender is sugar — all forms and especially fructose, which makes up half of sucrose and 55 percent of high-fructose corn syrup. One of the best ways to reduce your sugar intake is to stop drinking sodas and other sweet drinks, including fruit juices. Limiting alcohol, which may suppress fat-burning and add nutritionally empty calories, and avoiding refined carbohydrates like white bread and white rice are also helpful.

Make sure your diet contains adequate amounts of protein and dietary fiber, including vegetables, beans and peas and whole grains.

Get enough sleep — at least seven hours a night. In a study of 68,000 women followed for 16 years, those who slept five hours or less were a third more likely to gain 32 pounds.

Finally, move more. In a major national study, inactivity was more closely linked to weight gain and abdominal obesity than caloric intake.

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