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The True Value of an 80-Hour Work Week

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I recently shared with you the concept of the “time and effort chains,” which are the factors that trap us within a business and force us to work longer and harder, with little to no additional value or payoff.

Today I wanted to share with you the final chains that hold us back and keep us from reaching our goals. These, coupled with an understanding of the time-value matrix and a new way to look at control within your business, will play a huge part in your success or failure as a business leader.

A lack of clear priorities and objectives.

If every member on your staff doesn’t understand your priorities and objectives, efforts get scattered and poor decisions get made. This leads to underperformance, which pushes you to chase after more control to set things back on the right path. This further robs the business of depth because you’re not prioritizing time to develop your team so that they can take on more responsibilities. It’s a negative reinforcement loop.

This also impacts your team as a whole. The lack of strategic structure for how priorities get established, goals set, and plans made causes your team to flounder and struggle. Of course, you’re always there to pick up the pieces and take back more control, but by this point you understand where that leads.

A lack of strategic depth.

When you have a team that lacks the experience or talent to accomplish the goals you’ve set, you often find yourself pulled back into more closely managing the functions of your department, division, or business.

It becomes a chicken and egg scenario: if you had the right people on the team, you could let go of more.

But because you have to handle so much of the work, you don’t have time to hire or develop the people who could take on much of the load currently on your shoulders.

Round and round you go.

Outdated time habits.

The world today is fundamentally different than the world we evolved in. Our time sense was developed in a business world where time and effort were what we were paid for.

But that has shifted. In fact, with the transformation of modern communication and technology, work no longer has to take place in an office or factory; you literally can work from anywhere.

Yet the geographical freedom we now experience, which our ancestors couldn’t have imagined, has a dark side.

More and more of us feel compelled to always be on, checking our devices, responding to messages. The changing, 24/7, interconnected world has completely altered the way we live and work, and many of us simply haven’t updated our time habits to design the structures and systems we need to effectively and sustainably produce.

If you see yourself in any of what I’ve shared, it’s time to take action and start moving toward a reality in which your time and value chains no longer hold you back from moving yourself forward as a leader.

By: David Finkel

Source: https://www.inc.com/

Dr. Kelso discusses what many people feel is the most frightening part about pursuing a career in the medical field…the crazy work hours. He dispels the myth that it is impossible to enjoy yourself and work the hours of a physician!

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Five key facts about blue light in the workplace

In today’s digital world, many employees spend a large part of their days with their eyes glued to screens. While modern technology may offer many life and work-related benefits, it could also be negatively impacting our vision. High-energy visible (HEV) light, also known as “blue light,” is an intense light emitted by the sun, CFL and LED lighting, and the screens of electronic devices such as televisions, computers and smart phones. There are a lot of misconceptions out there about blue light though, so it’s important to separate the facts from fiction………

Source: Blue light is unavoidable in the digitally connected world

How To Spend Your Working Day Wisely And Actually Get Things Done – Bryan Collins

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Time doesn’t discriminate.

The CEO of a Fortune 500 company with an overloaded schedule and a college graduate procrastinating about starting a business each get 168 hours per week to spend as they see fit.

Some people are able to accomplish a lot from Monday to Friday (or to Sunday if you count weekends) while others struggle to get much done at all.

So what’s the best way to spend your time wisely and divide the working day so you can achieve what you want? And how do other successful people spend their 168 hours every week?

By Habit

“Don’t expect to be motivated every day to get out there and make things happen. You won’t be. Don’t count on motivation. Count on discipline.” – Jocko Willink

Author, former Navy seal and podcaster Jocko Willink gets up every morning about4:30 a.m. to exercise intensely before working on his business or the most important task for the day.

On Instagram, he posts black-and-white photographs of his wristwatch displaying his rising time. Willink also posts black-and-white photographs of “the aftermath” of his workout, for example a sweat-drenched towel or a barbell. Typically, the photo captions tell his many thousands of followers to “Get after it.”

Willink has cultivated a habit of rising early. Although getting up at 04:30 is an extreme rising time, you can still cultivate a habit of getting up early and working on your most important task for the day each day.

Then, like pennies filling a jar, these early mornings will accumulate over time!

By Energy Level

“By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” – Benjamin Franklin

Portrait of Benjamin Franklin (1706 -1790), American politician, United States of America, engraving by Vernier from Etats-Unis d’Amerique, by Roux de Rochelle, L’Univers Pittoresque, published by Firmin Didot Freres, Paris, 1837.

American founding father, inventor and writer Benjamin Franklin wrote about personal development long before Tony Robbins or Jim Rohn.

In his autobiography, Franklin described how he got maximum value from a regular working day.

Like our favorite Navy seal, Franklin rose about 05:00 a.m. and worked on what he valued most first thing. Typically he started each day by asking himself, “What good shall I do this day?”

In the late evening, Franklin put things back where they belonged and reviewed how his day went. He also reflected on his accomplishments or failures.

In other words, Franklin understood when he had the energy for attending difficult tasks (morning), when he was best suited to administrative tasks (afternoon) and when his mind was geared toward reflection (before and after sleeping).

By Theme

“The great opportunities and great ideas…get crowded out because you say yes to too many things.” – Tim Ferriss

A master of productivity, Tim Ferris is a believer in the power of deep work.

When in the midst of a project, such as writing a book, he sets rules for himself, whereby he goes on “no meeting diets,” or “no conference call diets” and so on and works instead on that one thing.

Thirty minutes into this podcast episode, Ferriss explains, he avoids activities unrelated to his book project while focused on that project.

Although you might not be writing a book, you could still dedicate a single day or even an entire week to an important project or theme and say no to everything else, like Ferriss.

For example, you could spend Mondays on business planning, Tuesdays on customer research, Wednesdays on marketing and so on.

Days of Week via Shutterstock

Spend Your Week Wisely

The trick to effective time management is deciding how and when you’re going to spend your time rather than letting other people decide for you.

You could create a habit you stick to each day, use self-knowledge to decide when to work on what or plan your days and weeks by project.

After all, depending on your approach, 168 hours is more and less than you possibly need.

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