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Top 10 Persuasive Writing Techniques

Admit it. You write because you want to convince your readers to do something or agree with your point of view. Or maybe you want them to be inspired by your words, to apply your teachings and principles, to act on your ideas.

Don’t want to admit it? Okay. This is not an interrogation. I’ll move on then.

Persuasion is the ability to present a certain situation as being beneficial to both parties. You make someone an offer they can’t refuse. Not in a Godfather sense of the way though.

Yes, you need to work at making the other understand that a good deal is being offered.

Weird, right?

And, yes, there are techniques that can help you create a more compelling case.

Here are the ten best persuasive writing techniques.

Prepare for… WORLD DOMINATION!

1. Repetition

Because no one is listening the first time you say something. They’re just not paying attention. So you must say it a second time. And you think to yourself, now they got it. Odds are, no, they didn’t.

The third time you say it, that’s when they ask a question about what you just said, because they really didn’t hear you the first times.

The fourth time you say it, they think to themselves: “Well, this must be important, because it’s the second time he’s told me about it.”

Or so the legend goes.

The truth is that repetition is crucial. The trick is to deliver your point in several different ways, such as directly, using an example, by telling them a story, or utilizing a quote from someone famous.

2. Use the power of because

“Why?” you ask.

“Because I said so.”

Because is such a powerful word that people are more likely to comply with a request if you just give them a reason why… even if that reason makes no sense at all to them.

The idea is that we don’t like to be told to do things without an explanation.

We’re all rebels here, so when you need people to be receptive to your line of thinking, always give reasons why.

Why?

Because I said so.

3. Consistency

Consistency (also known as congruency) is an important trait to have. It is associated with integrity and rational behavior.

We want to be consistent, so we don’t like to have conflicting ideas or opinions.

When it comes to writing this translates to making your reader agree with something that cannot be denied, then add all sorts of evidence to support your case. Tie it all back to the opening idea that has already been accepted in order to make your readers agree with everything you wrote.

4. Social Proof

This is a concept I talk about when making my case against posting too often, especially on a young blog.

We’re constantly looking for guidance from others, but at the same time we want to make sure that the people we associate ourselves with have been “verified by others.”

Yeah, that’s the best term that I could come up with.

It’s why testimonials are so effective, or why a person who’s seen having a lot of friends makes others want to be friends with them too.

How do you use social proof in your writing?

Quote from a bunch of famous people, use studies, and so on. If others agree with what you’re writing, then odds are that your readers will too.

5. Comparisons

Metaphors, similes and analogies are the persuasive writer’s best friends. When your scenario relates to something that the reader already accepts as true, you stand a better chance at making them see things your way.

6. Fix a problem

Don’t we all have problems? Don’t we all want them fixed?

You just need to identify the problem, play a bit with your readers emotions, then offer them the solution to their problem.

This sounds like something straight out of a plan for world domination, but it’s not about being cruel, it’s more about empathy. You want your readers to understand that you feel them, you get what they’re going through because you’ve also dealt with this issue.

Your solution is only as good as your ability to show the reader that you can feel his pain and struggle.

7. Become a modern-day Nostradamus

No, I’m not kidding you. This is an actual persuasion technique. The idea is to provide your readers with a convincing glimpse of the future.

Take into account current events and then tell folks how it’s going to be.

If this sounds foolish to you, it’s not. The only issue is that if you have no idea what you’re talking about, then you will appear to be foolish to your readers.

Your prediction needs to make sense, to be convincing enough. You need to demonstrate that you know what you’re about, that you’ve given this some serious thought.

8. Unify … Selectively

Do you know when people best work together? When they have to fight against another group.

We function primarily in a mode of “us vs. them.” There has to be an outside group we are aware of to form an identity as a group.

Exclusive memberships work like that. As a matter of fact, I believe the word exclusive means that you’re apart of a special group. The best group.

You can study pretty much every successful leader in the way they chose their words as to create a group, and especially the words they used to define everyone else outside that group.

The more difficult it is to be a part of a group, the more you want to become a member.

For instance, the group made up of all the hundred something thousand people who follow this blog is the best group ever. Honestly. Every single day they make my day, make me smile and laugh, offer incredible insight into the world of art, books, blogging, writing. Great people!

9. Address Objections

There will always be someone who disagrees with a particular statement of yours. This happens every time you make a nuanced point, so it’s best to identify those moments and address potential objections, because…

Credibility, I guess.

Yeah. That one.

It also means that you know what you’re writing about.

Storytelling

Storytelling is the wonder weapon: you can and should use it in combination with any and all of the previous nine techniques. Storytelling works so well because it allows people to persuade themselves, and that’s what it’s really all about.

Truth be told, we never convince anyone of anything — we just offer to help them decide we’re right. If you’re a great storyteller, then you can pretty much make people do whatever you want.

Including WORLD DOMINATION!

Source: Top 10 Persuasive Writing Techniques

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What’s Needed is Magic: Writing Advice from Haruki Murakami

If you can believe it, Japanese novelist, talking cat enthusiast, and weird ear chronicler Haruki Murakami turned 70 years old this weekend. 70! But I suppose we should believe it, despite the youthful gaiety and creative magic of his prose: the internationally bestselling writer has 14 novels and a handful of short stories under his belt, and it’s safe to say he’s one of the most famous contemporary writers in the world. To celebrate his birthday, and as a gift to those of you who hope to be the kind of writer Murakami is when you turn 70, I’ve collected some of his best writing advice……..

Source: What’s Needed is Magic: Writing Advice from Haruki Murakami

The A-Z of How to Write a Business Proposal

How to Write a Business Proposal

Success for small businesses is about getting new business. That’s what a business proposal is designed to do. These tips help you to organize, put your best business foot forward and close deals when you get a request for proposal (RFP).

How to Write a Business Proposal

Meet with The Client

To understand what a client is really looking for you need to meet with them before you write the proposal up. This is the best way to get some general information about the business, its management and employees.

Brainstorm

Understanding the best approach means brainstorming some options within your small business. Here you’ll need to tackle on some practical items like how much to charge the client to make it worth your while. A good rule of thumb is to multiply the costs by 1.5 to account for any unseen issues.

Your team needs to tackle questions like who will do the work, what needs to be done, how it will be accomplished and what the scheduled milestones are.

Organizing all the information you’ve gathered is easy using digital tools like Evernote.

Start Writing

Once you gone through the previous steps you’re ready to start writing your proposal. Although some of the details might vary, most of these business proposals follow a traditional template.

Create an Introduction for Your Business

Here is where you introduce your company again to the potential client. Include the name of your company, the nature of your business, and a quick industry profile.

Restate the Issue

This is a good place in any business proposal to repeat the problem or issue that prompted your prospect to ask for a proposal in the first place. It’s a good idea to keep in mind that the tone and style make a big difference. Plain language is always better than more colorful words.

Remember the old adage that you don’t need to use a five dollar word when a five cent one will do.

Be Specific About Methods and Goals

Being specific helps when you outline the goals that you hope to accomplish. This is a part of any business proposal that other businesses are listening to closely. Outline the methods you’re going to use here to but remember to be direct and to the point.

Keep in mind you don’t want to leave anything out . It’s very important to go through each and every step in your methods.

Be Clear about Costs and Time to Completion

There’s more meat and potatoes stuff. Transparency is one of the biggest ingredients to landing any deal with a good business proposal. That means you’ll need to be clear about how much time each and every step will take and what it will cost.

Explain Why You’re Qualified

Here’s the part of your business proposal where you sell your company. Again, you want to keep away from flowery language and stick to the facts. Don’t forget to stick with plain English. Keep in mind here that if this is your first business proposal, writing in journalistic simple style might be a challenge.

Hiring a proposal writer can grease the wheels of the whole process so you close the deal quicker. If you’re planning on using graphs and charts, you might want to hire a freelance designer too.

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