We Tried The World’s First Folding Phone, & It Actually Works – Nick Statt

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Samsung may be just days away from taking the wraps off its very own foldable smartphone-tablet hybrid, but consumer electronics company Royole has stolen a bit of its thunder with its very own flexible display device. Called the FlexPai, the 7.8-inch hybrid device can fold 180 degrees and transform from a tablet into a phone, albeit a bulky one. At an event in San Francisco this evening, Royole brought out a working version of the FlexPai that we actually got to hold, and the folding feature works as advertised. Granted, it feels miles away in quality from a high-end modern flagship, but it is still the first real foldable device I’ve seen in person, and not just in a concept video or prototype stage…….

Read more: https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2018/11/5/18067116/royole-flexpai-flexible-display-foldable-smartphone-tablet-pricing-features-release-date

 

 

 

 

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These 5 Innovative AI Companies Are Changing The Way We Live – Rosie Brown

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It’s 2018 and the world doesn’t quite look like a scene from “The Jetsons.” However, technological innovation spurred by advancements in computing has allowed for artificial intelligence to bring significant changes to the way businesses operate, impacting our everyday lives. Here are five industries impacted by AI…….

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/nvidia/2018/11/01/these-5-innovative-ai-companies-are-changing-the-way-we-live/#2dc9a60e5a7f

 

 

 

 

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Swiss Startup Aims To Help Paralyzed People Walk – Matthew Herper

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A group of scientists associated with GTX Medical, a Swiss medical device firm, published new evidence yesterday that using electricity to stimulate the spinal cord can help paralyzed people regain some walking ability. The new results, published yesterday in Nature and its sister journal Nature Neuroscience, show that using patterns of electrical stimulation allowed three men to regain the ability to walk with training. Unlike previous studies published in Nature Medicine and The New England Journal of Medicine, which used continuous electrical signals, not pulses, two of the men maintained the ability to walk even when the stimulation device was turned off……..

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/matthewherper/2018/11/01/swiss-startup-aims-to-help-paralyzed-people-walk/#75cb0e4a7557

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This Thermometer Tells Your Temperature, Then Tells Firms Where to Advertise – Sapna Maheshwari

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Most of what we do — the websites we visit, the places we go, the TV shows we watch, the products we buy — has become fair game for advertisers. Now, thanks to internet-connected devices in the home like smart thermometers, ads we see may be determined by something even more personal: our health. This flu season, Clorox paid to license information from Kinsa, a tech start-up that sells internet-connected thermometers that are a far cry from the kind once made with mercury and glass……

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/23/business/media/fever-advertisements-medicine-clorox.html

 

 

 

 

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The Startup Postmates and Visa Use To Watch Their Language Just Raised $11.5 Million To Expand – Alex Konrad

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When the startup Qordoba first met with California venture capitalists to share its software idea, its founders faced an uphill battle for attention. Its chief executive was a female ex-banker. Its chief technology officer was Syrian and had taught himself English. And their business was based in Dubai. But Qordoba was operating in a market that resonated across geographies: translation. Initially focused on helping businesses manage local teams to translate their projects and copywriting to different languages…….

Read more : https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexkonrad/2018/10/11/the-startup-postmates-and-visa-use-to-keep-their-language-consistent-just-raised-115-million-to-expand/#3d45b10a768c

 

 

 

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How To Improve Your Digital Journey With The Right Partners – Derek Klobucher

Compared to a classic IT solution, [partnership] enables you to go much further along the way in a short period of time,” Carlo Schots, from The Netherlands-based IT service provider Ordina, stated in a video shown at SAP Leonardo Now last month. “Together they enable you to innovate digitally.” Ordina partnered with SAP to help Brussels-based telecom Proximus expand its fiberoptic network, shipping materials from a central warehouse to contractors and subcontractors spread across the country. Proximus used some of SAP Leonardo’s intelligent technologies to…….

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/sap/2018/09/21/how-to-improve-your-digital-journey-with-the-right-partners-video/#1cd590056567

 

 

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Despite What Anti-Vaxxers Say, Vitamin K Shots Are Safe For Newborns – Lauren Strapagiel

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Babies are born with a deficiency in vitamin K, an important factor for proper blood clotting. So most newborns are given a shot of vitamin K soon after birth to prevent potentially life-threatening hemorrhages in the brain or intestines. It’s been standard practice since the early 1960s, but the rise in anti-vaccination rhetoric has also created a distrust around the vitamin K shot. And it’s all too easy to find risky or just plain false information. Search “vitamin K shot” on Google and some of the top results caution against them…..

Read more: https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/laurenstrapagiel/vitamin-k-shot-helps-protect-newborns

 

 

 

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Why You Shouldn’t Share Your Goals – Aytekin Tank

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The race to get the world’s first plane in the sky was a hard fought battle between The Wright Brothers and a lesser-known gentleman by the name of Samuel Pierpont Langley.

You will discover why you’ve never heard of the latter here shortly.

As you probably read somewhere inside that history textbook you were forced to lug around through elementary — The Wright Brothers were responsible for creating the first successful airplane. You remember how the story goes

“… it was a cold windy day on December 17th, 1903 in the Kill Devil Hills of North Carolina… Orville watched nervously as his brother Wilbur climbed inside the plane they had spent years perfecting… miraculously it flew for 59 seconds for a distance of 852 feet…”

While today “The Wright Brothers” is the first name that comes to anyone’s mind when they hear the word fly, once upon a time the pair were major underdogs.

In fact, during the race to the sky, most of America had its money on the man I mentioned earlier, Langley.

He was an extremely outspoken astronomer, physicist and aviation pioneer who was on a mission to make history. Langley’s high stature as the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution gave him both the credibility and hype he needed to get America on his side.

Not to mention, he was extremely well-backed by the War Department who contributed $50,000 to help him be the first to get a bird in the sky.

Long story short, despite all the hype, Langley’s flying machine ended up crashing and burning while The Wright Brother’s plane ended up soaring.

One party had the entire world, vast resources and plenty of moolah on his side, while the other just had a small bike shop and a passion to fly.

So, let me ask you this… can you guess why The Wright Brothers achieved their goal to take flight while Langley failed?

Early praise feels like you’ve already won.

The Wright Brothers victory over Langley came down to passion, intrinsic motivation (Langley was very status driven) and perhaps praise.

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While Langley was sharing his ambitions with the world and being heavily praised for feats he had not yet achieved, The Wright Brothers were receiving little to no attention whatsoever.

Some experts argue that early praise can leave the individual receiving the praise feeling like he or she has already won… in turn causing them to be less likely to follow through with their goals.

For example, in Peter Gollwitzer’s research article, When Intentions Go Public, he raises this very question:

Are scientists more likely to write papers if they tell colleagues about their intentions or if they keep their intentions to themselves?

Gollwitzer and his team of researchers carried out a handful of studies, here is a brief excerpt from their findings:

“Other people’s taking notice of one’s identity-relevant intentions apparently engenders a premature sense of completeness regarding the identity goal.”

In English, what Gollwitzer found was that when individuals set a goal that is closely tied to their identity and then share their intentions with others, they are less likely to achieve the goal.

For example, if your goal is to start drinking more water and you tell your friends and family that you’re going to start drinking more water, this would probably have little to no impact on whether or not you actually drink more water.

Why? Because drinking more water isn’t something you hold close to your identity.

On the other hand, if your goal is to lose 40 lbs and drop 2–3 waist sizes, it might not be the best idea to post about it all over Facebook. Your appearance is something you very much so identify with. So, if you tell people you plan to lose weight and everyone tells you how awesome you are and how great you’re going to look, you might be less likely to lose the weight.

This finding is a bit counterintuitive, considering we were told by our teachers and coaches growing up to set our goals, share our goals, hold ourselves accountable.

But, the theory certainly holds some weight (pun very much intended), and is one that has been adopted by highly successful serial entrepreneurs like Derek Sivers, founder of CD Baby.

Sivers gave a TED Talk on this very topic nearly a decade back. To prove his point, he asked the audience to imagine how they felt when they shared their goals with others:

“Imagine their congratulations and their high image of you. Doesn’t it feel good to say it out loud? Don’t you feel one step closer already? Like, it’s already becoming part of your identity?

Well, bad news. You should have kept your mouth shut. That good feeling makes you less likely to do it.”

Sivers goes on to explain that it’s this “warm feeling” that keeps us from battling on to actually achieve our goals.

When we openly share our goals, we experience a feeling of success that normally only takes place upon completion of the goal.

The result? We don’t ever actually pursue the goal.

Alternatives to sharing your goals.

I’ve recently shared 3 real-life business tactics to achieve your “big hairy goals”. But now, let’s talk about what can actually work when it comes to successfully reaching your goals.

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For two counterintuitive yet effective approaches to this, we look to a philosophy called “fear-setting” and making an effort to surround yourself with competition.

Embrace fear-setting over goal-sharing.

Entrepreneur, angel investor and writer, Tim Ferriss, gave an incredible TED Talk where he discussed how fear-setting is instrumental in achieving one’s goals.

He recommends that instead of obsessively sharing your goals, you should come to terms with all the fears that are preventing you from achieving them.

For example, let’s say your goal is to start your own business. Ferriss recommends that you write down all of your fears that are associated with starting a business.

These might include… “Losing all my money”… “Getting fired from my day job”… “Getting laughed at or judged if I fail”.

Once you write down these fears, you should then write down how you would go about preventing these fears (or mitigating the likelihood) of them actually happening.

For example, for the first fear “losing all my money”, your prevention might be… “I’m only going to invest $2,500 that way I can’t lose it all.”

Finally, after you have written down your preventions, you should then write down how you will repair what you fear from happening… if it actually ends up happening.

So, to repair losing the $2,500, you might write down, “Get a part time job as a bartender in addition to my day job until I make the $2,500 back.”

By concentrating on fear-setting over goal-sharing, it allows you to remove the fear that is keeping you from actually achieving your goals.

Surround yourself with competition.

In addition to fear-setting, it might also be a good idea to surround yourself with competition.

A healthy dose of competition can be good for your business, too. At JotForm, we love to use competition to our advantage with events like hackweeks to achieve our product release goals.

A study published two years ago in the journal Preventive Medicine Reports, sheds some light on the impact that competition has on our goals.

The study put 800 undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Pennsylvania through an 11-week exercise program where each person was assigned to work out alone or in a team.

In addition, the teams were designed to be either supportive or competitive.

By the end of the study, researchers found that students involved in the competitive team programs were 90% more likely to attend their scheduled exercise sessions than any other group.

Not only is this number staggering, but it also proves that competition can create a higher level of commitment among people chasing down goals.

When you surround yourself with competition, it doesn’t mean that you have to share your goals with the competition. You don’t have to tell the other folks in the spin class, cross-fit training or pick-up basketball leagues that your goal is to lose 50 lbs.

But, by simply showing up and placing yourself in a competitive environment, you will be more likely to push harder and show up more often — two factors that can help your reach your goals.


The science behind achieving goals has always been an interesting topic.

While some entrepreneurs advocate the idea that you should never have a goal, I’ve recently explained why setting big goals can make you miserable.

Whether you decide to share your goals or not, what I’ve found out across 12 years of entrepreneurship is that you should craft your own path.

What works for others won’t always work for you. And what works for you today won’t always work tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

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Africa Renewables Fund awards $1.6m for solar home lighting to 7,000 homes in Zambia —

Kazang Solar, Azuri Technologies’ official distribution partner in Zambia, has been awarded $1.6 million from the Africa Enterprise Challenge Fund (AECF) under its Renewable Energy and Climate Adaptation Technologies (REACT) window. Azuri is a leading commercial provider of pay-as-you-go solar home systems to off-grid homes in Africa and has been working with Kazang in Zambia…

via Africa Renewables Fund awards $1.6m for solar home lighting to 7,000 homes in Zambia —

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The Robot Will See You Now: Could Computers Take Over Medicine Entirely – Tim Adams

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Like all everyday miracles of technology, the longer you watch a robot perform surgery on a human being, the more it begins to look like an inevitable natural wonder.

Earlier this month I was in an operating theatre at University College Hospital in central London watching a 59-year-old man from Potters Bar having his cancerous prostate gland removed by the four dexterous metal arms of an American-made machine, in what is likely a glimpse of the future of most surgical procedures.

The robot was being controlled by Greg Shaw, a consultant urologist and surgeon sitting in the far corner of the room with his head under the black hood of a 3D monitor, like a Victorian wedding photographer. Shaw was directing the arms of the remote surgical tool with a fluid mixture of joystick control and foot-pedal pressure and amplified instruction to his theatre team standing at the patient’s side. The surgeon, 43, has performed 500 such procedures, which are particularly useful for pelvic operations; those, he says, in which you are otherwise “looking down a deep, dark hole with a flashlight”.

The first part of the process has been to “dock the cart on to the human”. After that, three surgical tools and a video camera, each on the end of a 30cm probe, have been inserted through small incisions in the patient’s abdomen. Over the course of an hour or more Shaw then talks me through his actions.

“I’m just going to clip his vas deferens now,” he says, and I involuntarily wince a little as a tiny robot pincer hand, magnified 10 times on screens around the operating theatre, comes into view to permanently cut off sperm supply. “Now I’m trying to find that sweet spot where the bladder joins the prostate,” Shaw says, as a blunt probe gently strokes aside blood vessels and finds its way across the surface of the plump organ on the screen, with very human delicacy.

After that, a mesmerising rhythm develops of clip and cauterise and cut as the velociraptor pairing of “monopolar curved scissors” and “fenestrated bipolar forceps” is worked in tandem – the surprisingly exaggerated movements of Shaw’s hands and arms separating and sealing tiny blood vessels and crimson connective tissue deep within the patient’s pelvis 10ft away. In this fashion, slowly, the opaque walnut of the prostate emerges on screen through tiny plumes of smoke from the cauterising process.

This operation is part of a clinical trial of a procedure pioneered in German hospitals that aims to preserve the fine architecture of microscopic nerves around the prostate – and with them the patient’s sexual function. With the patient still under anaesthetic, the prostate, bagged up internally and removed, will be frozen and couriered to a lab at the main hospital site a mile away to determine if cancer exists at its edges. If it does, it may be necessary for Shaw to cut away some of these critical nerves to make sure all trace of malignancy is removed. If no cancer is found at the prostate’s margins the nerves can be saved. While the prostate is dispatched across town, Shaw uses a minuscule fish hook on a robot arm to deftly sew bladder to urethra.

 
‘The technique itself feels like driving and the 3D vision is very immersive’: Greg Shaw controls
the robot as it operates on a patient Photograph: Jude Edginton for the Observer

The Da Vinci robot that Shaw is using for this operation, made by the American firm Intuitive Surgical, is about as “cutting edge” as robotic health currently gets. The £1.5m machine enables the UCH team to do 600 prostate operations a year, a four-fold increase on previous, less precise, manual laparoscopic techniques.

Mostly, Shaw does three operations one or two days a week, but there have been times, with colleagues absent, when he has done five or six days straight. “If you tried to do that with old-fashioned pelvic surgery, craning over the patient, you would be really hurting, your shoulders and your back would seize up,” he says.

There are other collateral advantages of the technology. It lends itself to accelerated and effective training both because it retains a 3D film of all the operations conducted, and enables a virtual-reality suite to be plugged in – like learning to fly a plane using a simulator. The most important benefit however is the greater safety and fewer complications the robot delivers.

I wonder if it changes the psychological relationship between surgeon and patient, that palpable intimacy.

Shaw does not believe so. “The technique itself feels like driving,” he says. “But that 3D vision is very immersive. You are getting lots of information and very little distraction and you are seeing inside the patient from 2cm away.”

There are, he says, still diehards doing prostatectomies as open surgery, but he finds it hard to believe that their patients are fully informed about the alternatives. “Most people come in these days asking for the robot.”

If a report published this month on the future of the NHS is anything to go by, it is likely that “asking for the robot” could increasingly be the norm in hospitals. The interim findings of the Institute for Public Policy Research’s long-term inquiry into the future of health – led by Lord Darzi, the distinguished surgeon and former minister in Gordon Brown’s government – projected that many functions traditionally performed by doctors and nurses could be supplanted by technology.

“Bedside robots,” the report suggested, may soon be employed to help feed patients and move them between wards, while “rehabilitation robots” would assist with physiotherapy after surgery. The centuries-old hands-on relationship between doctor and patient would inevitably change. “Telemedicine” would monitor vital signs and chronic conditions remotely; online consultations would be routine, and someone arriving at A&E “may begin by undergoing digital triage in an automated assessment suite”.

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Even the consultant’s accumulated wisdom will be superseded. Machine-learning algorithms fed with “big data” would soon be employed to “make more accurate diagnoses of diseases such as pneumonia, breast and skin cancers, eye diseases and heart conditions”. By embracing a process to achieve “full automation” Lord Darzi’s report projects that £12.5bn a year worth of NHS staff time (£250m a week) would be saved “for them to spend interacting with patients” – a belief that sounds like it would be best written on the side of a bus.

While some of these projections may sound far more than the imagined decade away, others are already a reality. Increasingly, the data from sensors and implants measuring blood sugars and heart rhythms is collected and fed directly to remote monitors; in London, the controversial pilot scheme GP@Hand has seen more than 40,000 people take the first steps toward a “digital health interface” by signing up for online consultations accessed through an app – and in the process, de-registering from their bricks-and-mortar GP surgery. Meanwhile, at the sharpest end of healthcare – in the operating theatre – robotic systems like the one used by Greg Shaw are already proving the report’s prediction that machines will carry out surgeries with greater dexterity than humans. As a pioneer of robotic surgical techniques, Lord Darzi knows this better than most.Bedside robots will feed patients while others would assist with physio

In a way, it is surprising that it has taken so long to reach this point. Hands-off surgery was first developed by the US military at the end of the last century. In the 1990s the Pentagon wanted to explore ways in which operations at M*A*S*H-style field hospitals might be performed by robots controlled by surgeons at a safe distance from the battlefield. Their investment in Intuitive Surgical and its Da Vinci prototype has given the Californian company – valued at $62bn – a virtual monopoly, fiercely guarded, with 4,000 robots now operating around the world.

Jaime Wong MD is the consultant lead on the R&D programme at Intuitive Surgical. He is also a urologist who has been using a Da Vinci robot for more than a decade and watched it evolve from original 2D displays that involved more spatial guesswork, to the current far more manoeuvrable and all-seeing version.

Wong still enjoys seeing traditional open surgeons witnessing a robotic operation for the first time and “watching the amazement on their faces at all the things they did not quite realise are located in that area”.

In the next stage of development, he sees artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning playing a significant role in the techniques. “Surgery is becoming digitised, from imaging to movement to sensors,” he says, “and everything is translating into data. The systems have a tremendous amount of computational power and we have been looking at segmenting procedures. We believe, for example, we can use these processes to reduce or eliminate inadvertent injuries.”

Up until recently, Da Vinci, having stolen a march on any competition, has had this field virtually to itself. In the coming year, that is about to change. Google has, inevitably, developed a competitor (with Johnson & Johnson) called Verb. The digital surgery platform – which promises to “combine the power of robotics, advanced instrumentation, enhanced visualisation, connectivity and data analytics” – aims to “democratise surgery” by bringing the proportion of robot-assisted surgeries from the current 5% up to 75%. In Britain, meanwhile, a 200-strong company called CMR Surgical (formerly Cambridge Medical Robotics) is close to approval for its pioneering system, Versius, which it hopes to launch this year.

Wong says he welcomes the competition: “I tend to think it validates what we have been doing for two decades.”

The latest creators of robot surgeons see ways to move the technology into new areas. Martin Frost, CEO of the Cambridge company, tells me how the development of Versius has involved the input of hundreds of surgeons with different soft-tissue specialities, to create a portable and modular system that could operate not just in pelvic areas but in more inaccessible parts of the head, neck and chest.

“Every operating room in the world currently possesses one essential component, which is the surgeons’ arm and hand,” Frost says. “We have taken all of the advantages of that form to make something that is not only bio-mimicking but bio-enhancing.” The argument for the superiority of minimally invasive surgery is pretty much won, Frost suggests: “The robotic genie is out of the bottle.”

And what about that next stage – does Frost see a future in which AI-driven techniques are involved in the operation itself?

“We see it in small steps,” he says. “We think that it is possible, within a few years, that a robot may do part of certain procedures ‘itself’, but we are obviously a very long way from a machine doing diagnosis and cure, and there being no human involved.”A specialist mentor could be looking at different camera views, providing second opinions. It will be like ‘phone a friend’

The other holy grail of telesurgery – the possibility of remote “battlefield” operations – is closer to being a reality. In a celebrated instance, Dr Jacques Marescaux, a surgeon in Manhattan, used a protected high-speed connection and remote controls to successfully remove the gallbladder of a patient 3,800 miles away in Strasbourg in 2001. Since then there have been isolated instances of other remote operations but no regular programme.

In 2011, the US military funded a five-year research project to determine how feasible such a programme might be with existing technology. It was led by Dr Roger Smith at the Nicholson Center for advanced surgery in Florida.

Smith explained to me how his study was primarily to determine two things: first, latency – the tiny time lag of high-speed connections over large distances – and second, how that lag interfered with a surgeon’s movements. His studies found that if the lag rose above 250 milliseconds “the surgeon begins to see or sense that something is not quite right”. But also that using existing data connections, between major cities, or at least between major hospital systems, “the latency was always well below what a human surgeon could perceive”.

The problem lay in the risk of unreliability of the connection. “We all live on the internet,” Smith says. “Most of the time your internet connection is fantastic. Just occasionally your data slows to a crawl. The issue is you don’t know when that will happen. If it occurs during a surgery you are in trouble.” No surgeon – or patient – would like to see a buffering symbol on their screen.

The ways around that would involve dedicated networks – five lines of connectivity with a performance level at least two times what you would ever need, Smith says, “so that the chances of having an issue were like one in a million”.

Those kinds of connections are available, but the lack of investment is more one of regulation and liability than cost. Who would bear the risk of connection failure? The state in which the surgeon was located, or that in which the patient was anaesthetised – or the countries through which the cable passed? As a result, Smith says: “In the civilian world, there are few situations where you would say this is a must-have thing.”

He envisages three possible champions of telesurgery: the military, “If you could, say, create a connection where the surgeon could be in Italy and the patient in Iraq”; medical missionaries, “Where surgeons in the developed world worked through robots in places without advanced surgeons”; and Nasa, “At a point where you have enough people in space that you need to set up a way to do surgery.” For the time being the technology is not robust enough for any of these three.

For Jaime Wong the risks are likely to remain too great. Intuitive Surgical is pursuing the concepts of “telementoring” or “teleproctoring” rather than telesurgery. “The local surgeon would be performing the surgery, while our monitor would be remote,” he suggests, “and a specialist mentor could be looking at different camera views, providing second opinions. It will be like ‘phone a friend’.”

True telesurgery, Roger Smith suggests, also begs a further question, one which we may yet hear in the coming decade or so. “Would you have an operation without a surgeon in the room?” For the time being, the answer remains a no-brainer.

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