5 Questions That Impress Hiring Managers

The interview has gone well. You presented your skills effectively and had a good exchange with everyone you met. You even made them laugh. Now, comes the dreaded final question.

Do you have any questions for us?

Well, sure. Were you really truthful about what it’s like to work here? Who’s the biggest office gossip? What am I going to love and/or hate about this company? But those aren’t things you can typically blurt out in an interview.

Instead, you’ll want to use this time to ask some questions that may both impress hiring managers and reveal important information. When you go for your next interview, keep these five questions in your pocket:

Do you see any major changes in the position or workplace in the coming year?

This may be a difficult question to answer in the COVID-19 era, but it may give you insight into what the company is thinking about the future, says Jon Hill, CEO and chairman of the Energists, an executive search and recruiting firm. “Many companies are in a period of transition and uncertainty as the pandemic continues, so it’s smart to get a read on how that might affect you if you’re hired. You don’t want to go in expecting long-term remote work only to find out you’ll be going into the office come summer,” he says. The question also shows you’re thinking long-term and plan to stay with the company through the changes.

What can I do to really “win” at this job?

Who wouldn’t want to hear this question from a candidate? It shows that you want to get a peek behind the curtain at what it takes to succeed at the firm. Interviewee questions such as this give interviewers a look at the candidate’s drive and potential for success, says Jennifer Morehead, CEO of Flex HR, an HR outsourcing firm. “The questions that interviewees ask are often more indicative of their success than their canned answers to questions. I really do think that interviewee questions can really set a candidate apart from the rest,” she says. To put it another way: What will “success” look like in this role?

If you were to leave this company, what would be the reason?

It’s a little bold, but when asked of a potential manager, it’s a powerful question that will reveal two key things, says Microsoft senior security program manager Teddy Phillips. First, it lets you see the interviewer’s future ambitions, and it also gives you insight into whether this person’s ambitions can be met at this company, he says.

“This allows the interviewee to dig on the ‘why’ or ‘why not’ to give them further insight on if this is an environment to grow their career. Hiring managers respect deep questions that make us think and deliver insightful answers,” he says.

What growth opportunities does the organization offer?

Immediately, this question shows the hiring manager that you’re thinking about how you can develop within the company. “Hiring is costly for organizations, so if they hire someone who is just looking for a paycheck until they jump to their next best opportunity, it costs the company time and money. Asking about the future and growth opportunities shows the employer that you are willing to invest in the organization on a longer-term basis,” says career strategist and coach Nancy Spivey. It also lets the hiring manager know that you’re success-driven and goal-oriented.

Is there anything else I can share to put me at the top of your list?

This one-two punch of a question shows that you’re interested in the job and invites the interviewee to ask any lingering questions. “Depending on how the interview is going and depending on how well you’re getting along with the interviewer, I regularly recommend to people to make it known that you love the place and what you’re hearing and would love the job,” says executive and career coach Lauren Cohen. It’s a strong question on which to end the interview.

“The best interview questions serve two functions,” Hill says. First, they give you useful insight into the position’s more demanding aspects and whether you’re qualified to meet those demands. Second, they show the interviewer that you’re already thinking practically about how you’ll perform in the position, an encouraging thing to see from a candidate. When you can ask relevant questions, you can impress the hiring manager and get the information you need to make the best decisions about your next career move.

By:  Gwen Moran

Source: 5 questions that impress hiring managers

.

References:

  • Dipboye, Robert L.; Macan, Therese; Shahani-Denning, Comila (2012). “The Selection Interview from the Interviewer and Applicant Perspectives: Can’t Have One without the Other”. In Schmitt, Neal (ed.). The Oxford Handbook of Personnel Assessment and Selection. Oxford University Press. pp. 323–352. doi:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199732579.013.0015. ISBN 978-0-19-993069-2.
  • Wiesner, Willi H.; Cronshaw, Steven F. (December 1988). “A meta-analytic investigation of the impact of interview format and degree of structure on the validity of the employment interview*”. Journal of Occupational Psychology. 61 (4): 275–290. doi:10.1111/j.2044-8325.1988.tb00467.x.
  • “The Value or Importance of a Job Interview”. Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2014-01-17.
  • “INTRODUCTION TO INTERVIEWING”. Brandeis University. Retrieved 2015-05-02.
  • Huffcutt, Allen I. (March 2011). “An Empirical Review of the Employment Interview Construct Literature: Employment Interview Constructs”. International Journal of Selection and Assessment. 19 (1): 62–81. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2389.2010.00535.x. S2CID 142542835.
  • Huffcutt, Allen I.; Conway, James M.; Roth, Philip L.; Stone, Nancy J. (2001). “Identification and meta-analytic assessment of psychological constructs measured in employment interviews”. Journal of Applied Psychology. 86 (5): 897–913. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.86.5.897. PMID 11596806.
  • Salgado, Jesus F.; Moscoso, Silvia (September 2002). “Comprehensive meta-analysis of the construct validity of the employment interview”. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology. 11 (3): 299–324. doi:10.1080/13594320244000184. S2CID 145118429.
  • Note: personal and demographic characteristics of applicants that may influence interviewer evaluations of interviewee responses in an illegal, discriminatory way
  • Pinciroli, Marco (18 December 2019). “Assessing the impact of business agility model on smart attitude of people : an empirical analysis”. hdl:10589/151793.
  • Morgeson, Frederick P.; Reider, Matthew H.; Campion, Michael A. (September 2005). “Selecting Individuals in Team Settings: The Importance of Social Skills, Personality Characteristics, and Teamwork Knowledge”. Personnel Psychology. 58 (3): 583–611. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.471.4365. doi:10.1111/j.1744-6570.2005.655.x.
  • Campbell, J. P., McCloy, R. A., Oppler, S. H., & Sager, C. E. (1993). A theory of performance. In N. Schmitt & W. C. Borman (Eds.), Personnel selection in organizations (pp. 35–70). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Schlenker, Barry R. (1980). Impression Management: The Self-concept, Social Identity, and Interpersonal Relations. Brooks/Cole Publishing Company. ISBN 978-0-8185-0398-6.[page needed]
  • Kacmar, K. Michele; Delery, John E.; Ferris, Gerald R. (August 1992). “Differential Effectiveness of Applicant Impression Management Tactics on Employment Interview Decisions1”. Journal of Applied Social Psychology. 22 (16): 1250–1272. doi:10.1111/j.1559-1816.1992.tb00949.x.
  • Ferris, Gerald R.; Witt, L. A.; Hochwarter, Wayne A. (2001). “Interaction of social skill and general mental ability on job performance and salary”. Journal of Applied Psychology. 86 (6): 1075–1082. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.86.6.1075. PMID 11768051.
  • Snyder, Mark (October 1974). “Self-monitoring of expressive behavior”. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 30 (4): 526–537. doi:10.1037/h0037039.
  • Tullar, William L. (1989). “Relational control in the employment interview”. Journal of Applied Psychology. 74 (6): 971–977. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.74.6.971.
  • “The Sound of Employability: Interviewers Judge Your Voice”. Association For Psychological Science. Retrieved 17 March 2021.
  • DeGroot, Timothy; Motowidlo, Stephan J. (1999). “Why visual and vocal interview cues can affect interviewers’ judgments and predict job performance”. Journal of Applied Psychology. 84 (6): 986–993. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.84.6.986.
  • Burnett, Jennifer R.; Motowidlo, Stephan J. (December 1998). “Relations Between Different Sources of Information in the Structured Selection Interview”. Personnel Psychology. 51 (4): 963–983. doi:10.1111/j.1744-6570.1998.tb00747.x.
  • Maurer, Todd J.; Solamon, Jerry M.; Lippstreu, Michael (April 2008). “How does coaching interviewees affect the validity of a structured interview?: PREDICTIVE VALIDITY: COACHED AND UNCOACHED INTERVIEWEES”. Journal of Organizational Behavior. 29 (3): 355–371. doi:10.1002/job.512.
  • Levashina, Julia; Campion, Michael A. (November 2007). “Measuring faking in the employment interview: Development and validation of an interview faking behavior scale”. Journal of Applied Psychology. 92 (6): 1638–1656. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.473.7399. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.92.6.1638. PMID 18020802.
  • Tay, Cheryl; Ang, Soon; Van Dyne, Linn (March 2006). “Personality, biographical characteristics, and job interview success: A longitudinal study of the mediating effects of interviewing self-efficacy and the moderating effects of internal locus of causality”. Journal of Applied Psychology. 91 (2): 446–454. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.323.7495. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.91.2.446. PMID 16551195.
  • Becton, John Bret; Feild, Hubert S.; Giles, William F.; Jones-Farmer, Allison (April 2008). “Racial differences in promotion candidate performance and reactions to selection procedures: a field study in a diverse top-management context”. Journal of Organizational Behavior. 29 (3): 265–285. doi:10.1002/job.452.
  • McCarthy, Julie M.; Van Iddekinge, Chad H.; Campion, Michael A. (June 2010). “Are Highly Structured Job Interviews Resistant to Demographic Similarity Effects?”. Personnel Psychology. 63 (2): 325–359. doi:10.1111/j.1744-6570.2010.01172.x.
  • Huffcutt, Allen I.; Roth, Philip L. (1998). “Racial group differences in employment interview evaluations”. Journal of Applied Psychology. 83 (2): 179–189. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.83.2.179.
  • McFarland, Lynn A.; Ryan, Ann Marie; Sacco, Joshua M.; Kriska, S. David (August 2004). “Examination of Structured Interview Ratings Across Time: The Effects of Applicant Race, Rater Race, and Panel Composition”. Journal of Management. 30 (4): 435–452. doi:10.1016/j.jm.2003.09.004. S2CID 145444585.
  • Wade, Kim J.; Kinicki, Angelo J. (February 1997). “Subjective Applicant Qualifications and Interpersonal Attraction as Mediators within a Process Model of Interview Selection Decisions”. Journal of Vocational Behavior. 50 (1): 23–40. doi:10.1006/jvbe.1996.1538.
  • Segrest Purkiss, Sharon L.; Perrewé, Pamela L.; Gillespie, Treena L.; Mayes, Bronston T.; Ferris, Gerald R. (November 2006). “Implicit sources of bias in employment interview judgments and decisions”. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. 101 (2): 152–167. doi:10.1016/j.obhdp.2006.06.005.
  • Roth, Philip L.; Iddekinge, Chad H.; Huffcutt, Allen I.; Eidson, Carl E.; Schmit, Mark J. (December 2005). “Personality Saturation in Structured Interviews”. International Journal of Selection and Assessment. 13 (4): 261–273. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2389.2005.00323.x.
  • Van Iddekinge, Chad H.; Raymark, Patrick H.; Roth, Philip L. (May 2005). “Assessing Personality With a Structured Employment Interview: Construct-Related Validity and Susceptibility to Response Inflation”. Journal of Applied Psychology. 90 (3): 536–552. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.90.3.536. PMID 15910148.
  • Klehe, Ute-Christine; Latham, Gary P. (June 2005). “The Predictive and Incremental Validity of the Situational and Patterned Behavior Description Interviews for Teamplaying Behavior”. International Journal of Selection and Assessment. 13 (2): 108–115. doi:10.1111/j.0965-075x.2005.00305.x. S2CID 145083955.
  • Chuang, Aichia; Sackett, Paul R. (1 January 2005). “The Perceived Importance of Person-Job Fit and Person-Organization Fit Between and within Interview Stages”. Social Behavior and Personality. 33 (3): 209–226. doi:10.2224/sbp.2005.33.3.209.
  • Kristof-Brown, Amy L. (September 2000). “Perceived Applicant Fit: Distinguishing Between Recruiters’ Perceptions of Person-Job and Person-Organization Fit”. Personnel Psychology. 53 (3): 643–671. doi:10.1111/j.1744-6570.2000.tb00217.x.
  • Kutcher, Eugene J.; Bragger, Jennifer D.; Masco, Jamie L. (September 2013). “How Interviewees Consider Content and Context Cues to Person-Organization Fit: Interviewee Person-Organization Fit”. International Journal of Selection and Assessment. 21 (3): 294–308. doi:10.1111/ijsa.12039. S2CID 143277060.
  • Higgins, Chad A.; Judge, Timothy A. (2004). “The Effect of Applicant Influence Tactics on Recruiter Perceptions of Fit and Hiring Recommendations: A Field Study”. Journal of Applied Psychology. 89 (4): 622–632. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.89.4.622. PMID 15327349.
  • Vivian Chen, Chun-Hsi; Lee, Hsu-Mei; Yvonne Yeh, Ying-Jung (September 2008). “The Antecedent and Consequence of Person-Organization Fit: Ingratiation, similarity, hiring recommendations and job offer”. International Journal of Selection and Assessment. 16 (3): 210–219. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2389.2008.00427.x. S2CID 144973573.
  • Dipboye, R. L., & Macan, T. (1988). A process view of the selection-recruitment interview. In R.Schuler, V.Huber, & S.Youngblood (Eds.), Readings in personnel and human resource management (pp. 217–232). New York: West.
  • Macan, Therese H; Dipboye, Robert L (December 1988). “The effects of interviewers’ initial impressions on information gathering”. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. 42 (3): 364–387. doi:10.1016/0749-5978(88)90006-4.
  • Macan, Therese Hoff; Dipboye, Robert L. (December 1990). “The relationship of interviewers’ pre-interview impressions to selection and recruitment outcomes”. Personnel Psychology. 43 (4): 745–768. doi:10.1111/j.1744-6570.1990.tb00681.x.

Dipboye, Robert L. (October 1982). “Self-Fulfilling Prophecies in the Selection-Recruitment Interview”. The Academy of Management Review. 7 (4): 579–586. doi:10.2307/257224. JSTOR 257224.

5 Essential Questions to Ask Before You Accept Any Job Offer

artistic image of two men shaking hands in an office space

You polished your résumé, dazzled them in interviews, and landed the job you’ve been chasing. You’ve finally received that coveted offer letter. But don’t get too excited yet.

“It’s sad to say that there are so many things you need to be aware of and careful of in something that should be very exciting for you,” says Kylie Cimmino, a consultant with HR consulting firm Red Clover HR. “But it’s about making sure that you’re covering yourself and you’re prepared for all of the minutiae that is included in that offer.”

So, before you answer your would-be employer with a resounding “Yes!” ask these five questions first:

Is this really the right position for you?

Paraphrasing actor Sally Fields’s iconic Oscar speech, it’s not uncommon to get caught up in the feeling of “They like me! They really like me!” and not think through whether this is truly the best job or offer for you. “Sometimes a job offer doesn’t fit, even though you applied for the role hoping it would. Take a moment and determine if this is really the job you are looking for,” says Paul Wolfe, senior vice president of human resources for Indeed.com.

Think about the role and how it fits into your career plans. And, if you haven’t already, look into the company and its culture to see if this is a place where you really want to work. Sites like Glassdoor, Indeed, and others have reviews by employees that give a glimpse into the strengths and weaknesses of the company. Use your personal and professional networks to get a sense of what it’s really like to work for the company. If you don’t know anyone personally, it’s likely you’re just a contact or two away from someone who can give you more insight, Wolfe says.

Are there contingencies or conditions?

Some offers are contingent on a variety of factors, including background or drug tests, reference checks, or willingness to sign a noncompete or other agreement. Review these contingencies carefully and consider whether any of them may surface issues from your past or may not be something to which you’re willing to agree, says Colleen Drennen Pfaller, founder of HR consulting firm A Slice of HR.

Sometimes, the contingencies are assumed and may not be in the offer letter, she says. “[If] it’s spelled out, great. But if it’s not, you want to follow up and ask,” she says. Certainly, have that conversation before you give notice at your current employer. For example, if there is a signing bonus, do you need to remain at the job a certain period of time to keep it or do you need to pay it back? These are all factors that you should understand before accepting the job offer.

If you suspect that something like a background check will reveal a potential issue, it may be a good idea to broach the topic first, or at least have an explanation ready if it comes up, Cimmino adds. For example, if you take a prescription medication that may show up in a drug test, be prepared to address the issue, she says.

Is everything you want in the offer?

Read the offer carefully to ensure that anything you negotiated is in it, Wolfe says. Or, if there are additional concessions or add-ons—for example, additional paid time off, moving allowance, subsidized parking, etc.—that you’re seeking, set up a time to talk with your prospective employer. “Negotiating terms of the offer is a standard practice. You want to ensure that everything you were promised or expected is in that letter before signing on the dotted line,” he adds. Once you’ve accepted the offer, it can be difficult to go back and claim that you’re due something that was previously discussed, but not formalized in the offer.

What is the timing?

In addition, be sure you understand details that will affect your transition from job to job, including timing, Cimmino says. If you’re not starting your new job for a few weeks or if there will be a gap between when you leave your old job and start the new one, think about how you will bridge any health insurance or payroll gap. Be sure you understand when you are eligible for benefits such as health insurance, 401(k), and time off at the new company.

What impact will this job have on my family?

If your new role will require changes in your lifestyle, salary, hours, or other factors that may affect your family members, include them in the discussion too. For example, if you’re taking a pay cut or if the job requires more travel or a move, such changes will affect your spouse and children. It’s a good idea to be sure everyone’s on board, Wolfe says.

“While ultimately, the decision whether to take a job is the candidate’s, in many cases, their decision impacts others around them,” he adds. “Take time to consider and talk with your family about how this new position impacts everyone.”


Gwen Moran is a writer, editor, and creator of Bloom Anywhere, a website for people who want to move up or move on. She writes about business, leadership, money, and assorted other topics for leading publications and websites. She’s been honored by the U.S. Small Business Administration, Small Business Influencer Awards, and a few others. Find her on Twitter @gwenmoran and on Instagram @bloom.anywhere.

Source: 5 Essential Questions to Ask Before You Accept Any Job Offer

.

Critics:

Job analysis is crucial for first, helping individuals develop their careers, and also for helping organizations develop their employees in order to maximize talent. The outcomes of job analysis are key influences in designing learning, developing performance interventions, and improving processes.The application of job analysis techniques makes the implicit assumption that information about a job as it presently exists may be used to develop programs to recruit, select, train, and appraise people for the job as it will exist in the future.[5]

Job analysts are typically industrial-organizational (I-O) psychologists or human resource officers who have been trained by, and are acting under the supervision of an I-O psychologist. One of the first I-O psychologists to introduce job analysis was Morris Viteles. In 1922, he used job analysis in order to select employees for a trolley car company. Viteles’ techniques could then be applied to any other area of employment using the same process.

Job analysis was also conceptualized by two of the founders of I-O psychology, Frederick Winslow Taylor and Lillian Moller Gilbreth in the early 20th century. Since then, experts have presented many different systems to accomplish job analysis that have become increasingly detailed over the decades. However, evidence shows that the root purpose of job analysis, understanding the behavioral requirements of work, has not changed in over 85 years.

.

References

Rogelberg, S.G. (2007). Encyclopedia of industrial and organizational psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

The Future Of Jobs And Education

The world of work has been changing for some time, with an end to the idea of jobs for life and the onset of the gig economy. But just as in every other field where digital transformation is ongoing, the events of 2020 have accelerated the pace of this change dramatically.

The International Labor Organization has estimated that almost 300 million jobs are at risk due to the coronavirus pandemic. Of those that are lost, almost 40% will not come back. According to research by the University of Chicago, they will be replaced by automation to get work done more safely and efficiently.

Particularly at risk are so-called “frontline” jobs – customer service, cashiers, retail assistant, and public transport being just a few examples. But no occupation or profession is entirely future proof. Thanks to artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), even tasks previously reserved for highly trained doctors and lawyers – diagnosing illness from medical images, or reviewing legal case history, for example – can now be carried out by machines.

At the same time, the World Economic Forum, in its 2020 Future of Jobs report, finds that 94% of companies in the UK will accelerate the digitization of their operations as a result of the pandemic, and 91% are saying they will provide more flexibility around home or remote working.

PROMOTED

If you’re in education or training now, this creates a dilemma. Forget the old-fashioned concept of a “job for life,” which we all know is dead – but will the skills you’re learning now even still be relevant by the time you graduate?

One thing that’s sure is that we’re moving into an era where education is life-long. With today’s speed of change, there are fewer and fewer careers where you can expect the knowledge you pick up in school or university to see you through to retirement. MORE FOR YOUThese Are The World’s Best Employers 2020The Value Of Resilient LeadershipEmployers Must Act Now To Mitigate The Impacts Of The Pandemic On Women’s Careers

All of this has created a perfect environment for online learning to boom. Rather than moving to a new city and dedicating several years to studying for a degree, it’s becoming increasingly common to simply log in from home and fit education around existing work and family responsibilities.

This fits with the vision of Jeff Maggioncalda, CEO of online learning platform Coursera. Coursera was launched in 2012 by a group of Stanford professors interested in using the internet to widen access to world-class educational content. Today, 76 million learners have taken 4,500 different courses from 150 universities, and the company is at the forefront of the wave of transformation spreading through education.

 “The point I focus on,” he told me during our recent conversation, “is that the people who have the jobs that are going to be automated do not currently have the skills to get the new jobs that are going to be created.”

Without intervention, this could lead to an “everyone loses” scenario, where high levels of unemployment coincide with large numbers of vacancies going unfilled because businesses can’t find people with the necessary skills.

TURN 500$ INTO 2500$ IN ONE WEEK COMPLTELEY LEGITIMATE

The answer here is a rethink of education from the ground up, Maggioncalda says, and it’s an opinion that is widely shared. Another WEF statistic tells us 66% of employers say they are accelerating programs for upskilling employees to work with new technology and data.Models of education will change, too, as the needs of industry change. Coursera is preparing for this by creating new classes of qualification such as its Entry-Level Professional Certificates. Often provided directly by big employers, including Google and Facebook, these impart a grounding in the fundamentals needed to take on an entry-level position in a technical career, with the expectation that the student would go on to continue their education to degree level while working, through online courses, or accelerated on-campus semesters.

“The future of education is going to be much more flexible, modular, and online. Because people will not quit their job to go back to campus for two or three years to get a degree, they can’t afford to be out of the workplace that long and move their families. There’s going to be much more flexible, bite-sized modular certificate programs that add up to degrees, and it’s something people will experience over the course of their working careers,” says Maggioncalda.

All of this ties nicely with the growing requirements that industry has for workers that are able to continuously reskill and upskill to keep pace with technological change. It could lead to an end of the traditional model where our status as students expires as we pass into adulthood and employment.

Rather than simply graduating and waving goodbye to their colleges as they throw their mortarboards skywards, students could end up with life-long relationships with their preferred providers of education, paying a subscription to remain enrolled and able to continue their learning indefinitely.

“Because why wouldn’t the university want to be your lifelong learning partner?” Maggioncalda says.

“As the world changes, you have a community that you’re familiar with, and you can continue to go back and learn – and your degree is kind of never really done – you’re getting micro-credentials and rounding out your portfolio. This creates a great opportunity for higher education.”

Personally, I feel that this all points to an exciting future where barriers to education are broken down, and people are no longer blocked from studying by the fact they also need to hold down a job, or simply because they can’t afford to move away to start a university course.

With remote working increasingly common, factors such as where we happen to grow up, or where we want to settle and raise families, will no longer limit our aspirations for careers and education. This could lead to a “democratization of education,” with lower costs to the learner as employers willingly pick up the tab for those who show they can continually improve their skillsets.

As the world changes, education changes too. Austere school rooms and ivory-tower academia are relics of the last century. While formal qualifications and degrees aren’t likely to vanish any time soon, the way they are delivered in ten years’ time is likely to be vastly different than today, and ideas such as modular, lifelong learning, and entry-level certificates are a good indication of the direction things are heading.

You can watch my conversation with Jeff Maggioncalda in full, where among other topics, we also cover the impact of Covid-19 on building corporate cultures and the implications of the increasingly globalized, remote workforce. Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

Bernard Marr

 Bernard Marr

Bernard Marr is an internationally best-selling author, popular keynote speaker, futurist, and a strategic business & technology advisor to governments and companies. He helps organisations improve their business performance, use data more intelligently, and understand the implications of new technologies such as artificial intelligence, big data, blockchains, and the Internet of Things. Why don’t you connect with Bernard on Twitter (@bernardmarr), LinkedIn (https://uk.linkedin.com/in/bernardmarr) or instagram (bernard.marr)?

.

.

World Economic Forum

The Future of Jobs report maps the jobs and skills of the future, tracking the pace of change. It aims to shed light on the pandemic-related disruptions in 2020, contextualized within a longer history of economic cycles and the expected outlook for technology adoption, jobs and skills in the next five years. Learn more and read the report: wef.ch/futureofjobs2020 The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change. World Economic Forum Website ► http://www.weforum.org/ Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/worldeconomi… YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/wef Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/worldeconom… Twitter ► https://twitter.com/wef LinkedIn ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/worl… TikTok ► https://www.tiktok.com/@worldeconomic… Flipboard ► https://flipboard.com/@WEF#WorldEconomicForum

License

Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed)

An Expert on Getting Fired Shares How to Suck It up and Push Forward

1

Sometimes I get asked about hard decisions I’ve had to make in my career and how I’ve dealt with it. The hardest decisions in my career were the ones that were made for me. Namely, being terminated from a job.

As the effects of COVID-19 continue to unfurl, many promising careers are coming to an abrupt end. Headlines from all over the world are about companies large and small being forced to let employees go. It’s been a jolt to the senses.

I’ve had the “luxury” of getting let go (fired) from the last four companies that employed me. That’s right. I’ve been sacked four times in the last four and a half years. Before you pass judgement, I should note that I’ve over delivered and shattered every goal and benchmark I set from the start. Four years ago I moved from Washington, D.C., and entered the startup scene here in Copenhagen, Denmark. I brought my American work ethic and culture with me.

Regardless of the reasons I was fired—I don’t believe it was ever due to my processes, skills, or results—purpose of this article is to share with you how I’ve managed to spring back faster and stronger from being cut out of my job, time after time. … And how you can, too.

Get a reason.

In most cases, this type of abrupt change has given me a chance to reflect and re-frame my energy toward constructive growth. Self-reflection after being let go from a job is incredibly important. Even if you weren’t a fan of your previous boss or supervisor, there’s almost always a nugget of truth in their reasoning. It’s beneficial for you to consider it from his or her point of view.

I’ve always asked for a meeting a day or two after I sign the termination paperwork so I can gather my thoughts. I try to schedule an hour with my supervisor. And unless you’ve really messed something up, they’re likely to give you time. Why meet again after the initial firing?

Get some certainty: In many cases, you will replay the moments of that final conversation over and over in your head. Take notes on “the why” that led to the decision.

Get the story straight: Make sure that if you’re going to use your recent ex-employer as a reference, they have the right story and agree to give the positive side to your abilities.

Expectations of the future: Maybe you can ask about getting access to documents or files. Maybe there were some email connections you made. It never hurts to ask. The worst they can say is no.

Here are some additional considerations during your post-firing meeting:

Objectivity: Taking the objective route of working your way through thinking about the firing from their perspective can be cathartic.

Humanize it: Think of the person who fired you as a flawed human just like the rest of us and assume he or she made a decision out of something that was based in reason or fairness.

Beyond control: If the firing was only due to economic reasons, then rest assured that this happened through no fault of your own.

Angles: Consider the circumstances from all angles before moving forward. Would colleagues agree with the decision? Would a perfect stranger? Would it matter?

Post firing exercise.

In order to move on fast while growing as an individual and professional, I advise giving the following topics some thought. Write a few bullet points out:

  • Top 3 reasons given for being let go: X, Y, Z
  • Top 3 things I could have done to avoid this: A, B, C
  • Top 3 things I can learn to overcome A, B, C and avoid X, Y, Z are 1, 2, 3

If you couldn’t have changed anything, you’re nearly ready to move on. If you could improve something; save that. This should be the cornerstone of your road map moving forward.

changelly5Also important is to give yourself a reasonable period of time with a specific end date/time in mind where you are no longer going to allow yourself to feel bad about being fired. The last time I was terminated, I gave myself a total of an hour to feel sorry for myself. The first time I got fired I gave myself three days to throw myself a pity party. It’s OK to embrace all of the non-productive “woe is me” thoughts during this time. But once the time limit I set in advance was up, I set my mind into a state of focus on the next steps. Fight the urge to bring up or dwell on negative thoughts. They won’t serve you and won’t change anything.

Create your to-do list.

Step one to moving forward is starting something … anything. Often, the less time you put between your last day and getting back on your journey makes bouncing back much easier.

Focus on completing your to-do list. Put yourself into something that is cathartic but also measurable. Blend it with the three things you need to learn from the earlier bullet point exercise (Remember: X, Y, Z, / A, B, C, and 1, 2, 3). Even if you don’t believe in the reasons for your untimely exit, these points are still somewhat valid. Set a schedule that reflects working hours and begin working through your “to do list.”

Depending on your circumstances, you may feel that some self-improvement is necessary. Go for it. Find out what courses or books might help provide you with the insights and skills you need to take you to the next level. Perhaps even consider meditation if you don’t practice it already. A clear mind is ready for new challenges.

From there, of course, you’ll want to think about creating income. In other words, finding a new job. Spend time updating your resume, portfolio, and LinkedIn profile. While you’re on LinkedIn, consider reaching out to your connections. Someone you know in your industry might already be hiring for your next dream job. Never forget to ask for the job at the end of a meeting for just help in general. I always try to remember to ask people how I can help them for good measure, as well. Create a list of job prospects and keep it updated as your conversations progress.

Be proactive about staying positive.

Finding a new job might happen fast, or it might take some time. What should you do if the negative thoughts persist? Repurpose them into something constructive. Gamify it.

  • I’m not good enough = Work through a tutorial on YouTube and learn a new skill
  • Nobody will hire me = Make three new connections on LinkedIn or apply for three jobs
  • Nobody likes me = Read a chapter of a self-improvement book of your choice
  • I don’t have a network = Go to one event per week (virtual!) and meet three people

What came of my job losses?

I used all of my negative experiences as momentum and pure energy to drive forward. I went all-in on working toward setting meetings and interviews.

And you can do that, too.

After my last firing, I came to terms with my desire to run my own companies again rather than defer to others. Public speaking came first. I landed a ton of talks at meetups, keynotes, and guest lectures. When talking about what I was working on, I had a sense of humor about my job loss and used the opportunity to also mention I was looking for new clients and investment.

Ultimately, I went full in on my digital marketing/growth-hacking agency and proptech startup for architects.

Losing your job is not your identity, so don’t make it into one. Unemployment is temporary.

Remember things always get better when you’re being constructive. Building a to-do list and sticking with it should be your goal for now.

And whatever you do, don’t feed negative thoughts. They grow every time you give them a chance. Use any negative inclinations that spring up as momentum to get more done.

Never be afraid of asking for help. Put yourself out there. I’ve certainly done it here.

By: Taylor Ryan CEO Klint Marketing

bevtraders-2

Over 30 Million Americans Are Jobless

In less than two months, we have gone from an unemployment rate of 3.5%, a 50-year low to probably over 20%, the worst level since the Great Depression. Today’s Unemployment Insurance filings were 3.2 million, higher than economists’ consensus expectations. The number of jobs created since the Great Recession that ended in 2009 have been wiped out.

In the seven weeks, since states instituted stay-at-home requirements due to the COVID-19 pandemic over 33 million Americans have filed for unemployment benefits. As I have written in the last few weeks, those numbers understate the severity of the crisis, because there are still millions of Americans who have not been able to file for unemployment benefits, due to overwhelmed resources at departments of labor around the country.

I expect unemployment to continue rising in the energy sector where the default rate is significantly above the average for all companies in America. As I wrote in mid-April, high yield energy bonds are now at a record $217 billion of outstanding volume. This sector was already being adversely affected even before the 2019 crisis. According to Eric Rosenthal Senior Director – Leveraged Finance at Fitch Ratings, the “energy default rate stands at 9.9% following Whiting Petroleum Corp. WLL ’s bankruptcy.

Fitch projects the 2020 sector default rate to reach 17% by year end, closing in on the record 19.7% mark set in January 2017.” He went on to state that “Several names on our Top Bonds of Concern could be imminent defaults including Ultra Resources Corp., Vine Oil and Gas LP and Jonah Energy Inc. along with Chesapeake Energy Corp. CHK , California Resources Corp., Denbury Resources Inc. DNR , Unit Corp., Bruin E&P Partners LP and Chaparral Energy Inc.” These default rates are much higher than for the average default rate for all junk bonds. And until industry and travel start up again, it is hard to envision when the energy sector will recover. Energy companies are the majority of new companies added to Fitch’s April list of bonds of concern.

After energy, the next sectors that are the most vulnerable to a rise in default and hence laying off workers are retail and leisure and entertainment.

More unemployment will be coming not only from the private sector, but also from municipalities as their financial stress increases. In a report released this week by Moody’s Investors Service, ‘Outlook changes to negative as coronavirus intensifies severity and length of recession’ analyst Natalie Claes, wrote that Moody’s “outlook for US local governments is changing to negative from stable as our expectation of the duration and intensity of the coronavirus impact on the economic downturn grows in severity. The slow recovery will impair revenue and pressure operating reserves.

The sector will face challenges for the remainder of 2020 and continuing into 2021 as the economy recovers, because trends in local governments’ primary revenue source, property taxes, lag changes in economic activity.” Additionally, she pointed out that “Sales and income tax revenue, a significant source of revenue for some local governments, is already declining sharply given a rise in unemployment, reduced consumer spending, and income tax filing extensions. Property tax revenue will not take as great a hit until 2021 because assessments are set before the collection year, but a rise in delinquencies will start to weigh on revenue this year.” Unfortunately, this means that the next tsunami of unemployment will be amongst municipal employees such as police, firefighters, and teachers.

Even if we are lucky enough to start an economic recovery this year, it is very unlikely that all workers will be able to regain their jobs. Many employers are likely to be very cautious about ramping up their businesses, especially if there is uncertainty about COVID-19 returning again later in the year. Unfortunately, we have many more weeks of millions continue to file for unemployment benefits.

Follow me on LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I have been dedicated to providing clients high quality financial consulting, research, and training services on Basel III, risk management, risk-based supervision, capital markets, financial derivatives and Dodd-Frank for over 25 years. I have extensive global expertise and have led projects in the financial and energy sectors in over 30 countries in English, Russian, and Spanish

Source: Over 30 Million Americans Are Jobless

Please follow my Instagram: http://instagram.com/arminhamidian67

More Americans file for unemployment as coronavirus continues to ravage U.S. economy. Subscribe to Fox Business! https://bit.ly/2D9Cdse Watch more Fox Business Video: https://video.foxbusiness.com Watch Fox Business Network Live: http://www.foxnewsgo.com/ FOX Business Network (FBN) is a financial news channel delivering real-time information across all platforms that impact both Main Street and Wall Street. Headquartered in New York — the business capital of the world — FBN launched in October 2007 and is one of the leading business networks on television, having topped CNBC in Business Day viewers for the second consecutive year in 2018. The network is available in nearly 80 million homes in all markets across the United States. Owned by FOX Corporation, FBN is a unit of FOX News Media and has bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C. Watch full episodes of FBN Primetime shows Lou Dobbs Tonight: https://video.foxbusiness.com/playlis… Kennedy: https://video.foxbusiness.com/playlis… Follow Fox Business on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoxBusiness Follow Fox Business on Twitter: https://twitter.com/foxbusiness Follow Fox Business on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/foxbusiness

Career Strategies: The 5 Deadly Phrases To Avoid In The Job Interview Process

When it comes to the job interview process, whoever tells the best story wins. But certain phrases and ideas can short-circuit your career plans. Are you really able to have the kind of leadership conversation your job search deserves? When it comes to creating the career conversation that leads to consideration, avoid these five show-stoppers in the interview.

If you argue for your limitations, they are yours.

Richard Bach, Jonathan Livingston Seagull
  1. When Is Honesty NOT the Best Policy? – do you ever find yourself saying a version of this phrase: “If I’m being honest…”? TBH, that phrase is honestly hurting your chances in the interview process. Here’s why: if I need to call out the fact that I’m being honest right now, doesn’t it make you wonder if I’ve been honest with you up until this point? Why did I wait until now to get real and spill the T? Actually, in the interview, honesty is the only policy that works. Highlighting the fact that you are getting to the truth, but only just right now, can arouse suspicion and make people wonder why you aren’t full-on honest all the time. If you are a person of integrity, honesty is your default setting. Don’t create unnecessary suspicion. “To be honest…” is a filler phrase – like “umm” “Uh…” and “like”. None of those fillers are very satisfying in the job interview. So be really honest with yourself, and leave out the words that don’t serve you.
  2. The Fault Line – don’t cross it. “It was her fault” is the kind of blamestorming that can take you out of the running. Why? Because companies hire people who can overcome limiting circumstances. People are imperfect, nobody has a team of 100% superstars and circumstances often create difficulties in the office (that’s why it’s called work). How did you get past the obstacles and limitations – even if one of those obstacles was Jessica in Accounting? Phrases that blame people and situations point out your own limitations – what you couldn’t tolerate, tackle or transform. Focus on the story of how you overcame challenges, how you helped others to be better, or how you picked up the ball when somebody else dropped it. Remember, other people don’t need to be bad in order for you to be good. Concentrate on how you solve real problems – including personnel problems – by taking responsibility instead of laying blame.
  3. What You Don’t Know Won’t Hurt You – do you know how to answer an interview question where the answer is, “I don’t know” or “No, I don’t have that skill”? The fact is, no one can know everything. And not everything can be googled. Saying “I don’t know” isn’t a phrase that can NEVER hurt you – because it’s an honest and real response! The phrase that’s really dangerous? Trying to fake it until you make it! Don’t create a fiction around your skill set, ever. Any phrase that feels like fiction is one you’ve got to avoid.
  4. Disconnection is Deadly – Considering questions about skills or experiences you don’t have: are you able to connect your interviewer to a relatable topic – something that you do know, that might be supportive or helpful? For example, if the CIO says, “Do you have Salesforce Administrator Certification?” and you don’t, what do you do? Do you just say, “Nope!” blink twice and wait for your next mistake? Find a phrase that pays by connecting to what you do have: skills, talents and desire for the role! Point out the other experience or to action you can take to get what’s needed. “I don’t have the Admin certification but I went to Dreamforce [the company’s major annual conference] the last two years in a row. I’m very familiar with the software – let me share with you the experience I have and my training so far. If that certification is important, I can put together a plan to gain that credential in short order. Do you think that plan would be a requirement if I were to get this role?” Always connect your answers back to your interviewer, the company’s goals and your ability to work hard in the job – those things are always part of your story.
  5. Ultimatums – an ultimatum is a statement of what you won’t tolerate, usually phrased as a demand. Ultimatums reflect terms that you will or won’t accept, period. By definition, ultimatums point to your lack of flexibility and adaptability (two characteristics that might be useful for a new hire, wouldn’t you agree? Why would you demonstrate that you lack these two key qualities?) Now some ultimatums are important: “I won’t tolerate racism on my team”, for example, points to your beliefs and values. But “I won’t work on weekends” or “I need every Thursday afternoon off, or I can’t work here” is really pointing out your limitations. Look for phrases like “I can’t accept _______”, “I won’t allow that” or “That just won’t work for me.” Because if it won’t work for you, maybe you won’t work for this company. Every job interview is a negotiation. Once you get to “yes” you can decide if you want to take the job or not. You’re in the interview to explore your options – why start cutting yourself off from possibilities? Does it help your career to present demands and requirements, or are there other ways of looking at the situation? Is your ultimatum a personal preference that you’re clinging to, like a security blanket, or a statement of your integrity, values and work ethic? It’s better to keep your options open if you really want the job. Know the difference between uncompromising values and limiting statements that knock you out of the running. Keep your options open. Find out what’s really on offer and make a business decision to see if it fits for you. Ultimately, what you will and won’t accept is your decision, but arriving at that place without ultimatums is a smart way to frame the conversation.

The best interview is the most authentic, where you speak from your heart about the solution you can provide. By creating a dialogue with your interviewer, you build the conversation that matters most in your career. Don’t short-circuit your skills with ultimatums, filler phrases or fear of the unknown. The interview process is a journey of discovery. Your story – and the way you tell it – will guide you towards your next destination.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I write about the changing nature of the leadership conversation, and how communication creates the connections that matter. Recognized as the U.S. National Elevator Pit…

Source: Career Strategies: The 5 Deadly Phrases To Avoid In The Job Interview Process

34.5K subscribers
“Tell me about a difficult situation or challenge you faced in a workplace” By asking this question, employers are trying to see how you (A) take charge in handling a challenging situation, or (B) collaborate with your coworkers as a team to solve a conflict. They want to know if you have critical thinking and problem solving skill, how you approach the problem and the level of responsibility you take in challenging situations. It is very important to make sure that you use an example that demonstrates your ability to handle difficult situation. So do not mention about when you elevated the responsibility. Rather, talk about times when you stepped up and took a leadership position by collaborating with your coworkers. In order to construct effective story, use PAR model and follow the 3 steps. 1 Problem: Identify the problem. What was the issue? 2 Action: How did you and your coworkers analyzed the problem and took actions to solve the issue? 3 Result: What was the positive outcome in result of the action? By following PAR model, you can frame your story well. Watch the video to see example answer and start constructing your answer. Jobspeaker is a FREE service to help job seekers find better jobs. Login today!

Inside the Shady New World of Fake Resumes, Professional Interviewees, and Other Job-Seeker Scams

A few years ago, Daniel Zubairi caught a job applicant in a flagrant lie. The woman’s résumé said she worked at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. That didn’t sound right. Zubairi’s Bethesda, Maryland-based cybersecurity company, SydanTech, worked closely with NOAA–and Zubairi had never heard of her.

As it happened, Zubairi was at the agency’s offices during the woman’s phone interview. He asked to meet her in person. “Sir,” she said, “I’d like to end the interview now.” Click. Zubairi ran a background check. She was a home nursing assistant.

Job seekers have been fudging their accomplishments forever. But founders across the country say they’ve lately seen a surge of incidents that take job-applicant fakery to new–and shadier–levels. Totally false résumés featuring fictional employers. Professional interviewees. Covert coaching of candidates with no experience.

The stories have spread virally among business leaders. A CEO has a suspicious experience. She talks to another CEO, who says he’s heard similar stories. At a meetup of 50 CEOs this past summer, Zubairi shared his story. “Everyone agreed that they’ve seen something to that effect,” says Ahmed R. Ali, founder of the Rockville, Maryland-based Tista Science and Technology Corporation, who was in the room.

Hirer Beware
Tips for weeding out fraudulent job applicants
1. Request references from every applicant.
2. Contact hiring managers at previous employers.
3. Do background checks–expensive but worth it.
4. Ask granular questions about skills and former jobs.
5. Give everyone a skills test.

Zubairi and his peers have identified a growing problem, one that’s been largely unreported. It starts with low unemployment–now at its lowest since 1969. A tight labor market can be especially tricky for fast-growing startups. (SydanTech, No. 78 on this year’s Inc. 5000, certainly qualifies.) An imbalance of available talent and a company’s needs can send a dangerous message: These guys are desperate to fill seats.

Zubairi says he’s now caught multiple applicants in similar lies, and even identified a SydanTech employee who successfully faked his interview and worked at the company for nine months–before being caught and fired. Cybersecurity firms are especially vulnerable: The industry’s unemployment rate has been near zero since 2016. And many of Zubairi’s available jobs pay a minimum of $120,000 per year.

Cybersecurity is far from the only field affected. About the same time as Zubairi’s first encounter, Biju Kurian was in Oklahoma City, running Objectstream, an aviation IT company. (“We make flying safe,” he says.) Objectstream is also growing quickly–No. 2,992 on this year’s Inc. 5000–in a lucrative field with a talent gap. Kurian’s problem:

A woman who’d impressed over the phone had a different voice when she arrived for her first day, and seemed unfamiliar with the conversation they’d had. Eventually, he confronted her. She broke down, confessed, apologized, and quit on the spot.

On the surface, these appear to be candidates taking desperate measures. But the candidates themselves may not be the only ones at fault. As recruitment has migrated online and become automated, says Ben Zhao, a University of Chicago professor who studies online market­places, opportunities for scammers have arisen.

Profes­sional recruiters, who get placement fees when they land candidates in jobs, have a clear incentive to game the system, Zhao says. They are “middlemen who can make significant profit by misrepresenting clients.”

They might hire professional interviewees to do phone interviews, or feed answers to inexperienced candidates in real time. Or they might fake client résumés to make them look better to hiring algorithms–sometimes without telling those clients.

Michael Mathews, founder of Toledo, Ohio-based automotive recruiting firm Moxee, estimates that as many as 20 percent of recruiters are at least dabbling in such tactics. “It doesn’t surprise me anymore,” he says.

Zubairi thinks he’s found a way to screen some fakes. After his CEO meetup, he downloaded résumés submitted to SydanTech through the job site Indeed–and found dozens of near-identical documents. They bore the same formatting, titles, and job descriptions, down to the word. The only differences: the names of the applicants and the companies they claimed to have worked for. (Indeed declined to comment, but Inc. reviewed a selection of these documents.)

One common name on many of the dubious résumés: the Nigbel Group, whose bare-bones website describes it as an IT company in Houston. Zubairi says he’s called its phone number and nobody has ever picked up. Nigbel did not respond to multiple Inc. requests for comment, nor is it listed in the Texas Secretary of State’s database of taxable entities. To Mathews, the company sounds strikingly similar to fictional businesses he’s seen created by other recruiters to help punch up fake résumés.

In an age of digitally driven misinformation, perhaps it’s not surprising that fake job applicants would surge. As with other online-marketplace scams–say, counterfeit goods on Amazon–startups are more vulnerable than larger companies, simply because they have less money for prevention. “Smaller companies that don’t have resources will continue to be defrauded by these attackers,” predicts Zhao. And tech platforms will continue to play catchup with their hijackers.

By: Cameron Albert-Deitch Reporter, Inc. @c_albertdeitch

Source: Inside the Shady New World of Fake Resumes, Professional Interviewees, and Other Job-Seeker Scams

1.54K subscribers
An unfortunate reality is that of scam artists or con artists, and they can appear when we least expect them. We see con artists depicted in Hollywood movies and TV. We hear of various scams on the news. One type of scam that is becoming more common is the Job Scam. So, how can you identify if a job is legitimate or a scam? Here are my top 8 tips: 1. Immediate Offer – if you are given an offer without as much as an interview. 2. Interview via IM – employers typically conduct interviews, but legitimate employers do not use Instant Messenger to interview. 3. Poor Spelling & Grammar in Job Ad – this refers to obvious spelling and grammar mistakes. 4. E-mail Address – the email address should be professional and include the company name (not Gmail, yahoo, live, etc.). 5. Asks You to Pay – legitimate employers will never ask you to transfer money to them for any reason. 6. Personal Info – this is a tricky one. Although you will need to send your personal details eventually to an employer as per their background check process, be wary of any websites to which you need to upload your personal information. It should be an https address (the “s” stands for secure). 7. Bank Details – again, legitimate employers will need your banking details in order to pay you. Be wary if a prospective employer asks for additional banking information, such as the answers to your security questions or for your PIN number. 8. Intuition – trust your intuition. If you believe a job might be a scam, be sure to proceed with extra caution and do your research! What to do if you Suspect a Job is a Scam? For every role, it is highly recommended that you conduct thorough research on the organization and on the people with whom you will be meeting. That said, some of the savvier scam artists have “borrowed” LinkedIn profiles of legitimate people. Be sure to take note of the LinkedIn profile to see how many connections a person has (i.e. do they have any connections? Is the profile complete?). If you do suspect that you have been contacted by a job scammer, be sure to report it to the local police, or in Canada to the RCMP’s fraud unit. Finally, be sure to share your experience with others and share this video. The more we are aware of these types of scams and are able to help others identify them, all ships will float higher. If you would like personalized advice, you can find me on http://www.jobhuntsolutions.com or if you have any questions, you can leave a comment below, or contact me here: Email: nicole@jobhuntsolutions.com Website: http://www.jobhuntsolutions.com Twitter: @ recruitmentcoach LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/job-… Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jobhuntsolut… Until next time, happy hunting!

The Real Reasons Why Job Seekers Are Not Given Feedback

A common complaint and cause of frustration and irritation for interviewees is the absence of feedback after their interviews. It wasn’t always like this. In the past, it was standard protocol to provide feedback and constructive criticism to candidates. The hiring manager or human resources professional would diplomatically let the applicants know what they did well and the areas in which they need to improve upon.

The feedback was freely given with the best of intentions. The advice would consist of some positive aspects and, when justified, helpful critiques of the candidate—with respect to their skills, relevancy of their background and performance within the interview sessions. This would prove extremely helpful and productive if the person was invited back to partake in additional interviews. Even if the job seeker was turned down, they’d be provided with guidance so that they could perform better when they interview again somewhere else. The candidates could advantageously implement this vital information and constructive criticism.

This information relayed to candidates is important for them to conduct a self-assessment to ensure that they are presenting themselves in the best possible light. It’s similar to a batting coach in baseball who helps you improve upon your swing. His advice may not always be positive, but the goal is to make you a better baseball player.

Unfortunately, time’s have changed and this no longer applies to the present. In the current job market, feedback is offered sparingly—if at all. There is little-to-no feedback or constructive criticism offered. If you’re not accepted to proceed in the interview process, it’s rare to get a rejection letter or receive any input and advice from the company as to why you were unceremoniously passed over.

All the niceties and politeness are gone. You will now only hear from human resources if they want to move forward with you; otherwise, you get the silent treatment.

Here is why this happens.

Too Much Data

There has been a rapid proliferation of job boards, job aggregation sites (like Indeed and Glassdoor), Google for Jobs and corporate career pages. In addition to the ubiquity of jobs posted everywhere, everyone has a smartphone with them at all times. This combination makes it easy to search for jobs and easily apply. Many job seekers take the not-recommended approach of submitting their résumés for dozens of jobs—a large portion of which they’re not suited for, but want to give it a shot nonetheless.

Corporate talent acquisition and human resources professionals are deluged with résumés. Even with the applicant tracking systems that corporations have, it’s too much to handle. It becomes virtually impossible for the company to get back to everyone who submits their résumé. You may get a canned email response to your résumé or applications, but that’s about it. Don’t expect any meaningful color on whether or not you’re deemed a good fit for the job or company.

Fear Of Lawsuits

In today’s litigious society, companies are concerned about saying anything at all to candidates that could possibly be misconstrued. They are especially scared to give negative feedback to candidates out of fear that it might be misinterpreted as discrimination.

Something relatively innocuous said by an interviewer could be interpreted as sexist, ageist, racist or any other form of prejudice. Corporate executives are deathly afraid of costly, time-consuming lawsuits ensuing.

There is also the concern over a social media backlash because of something an employee said to a candidate. All you need is one disgruntled, denied job seeker to post his or her outrage on Twitter and it could go viral—irreparably damaging the company’s reputation. Not offering any feedback is a safer legal and public relations strategy for the company.

Stalling For Time

There is a belief by corporate executives that there is an abundance of qualified candidates. They erroneously believe that if the HR department waits longer, they will eventually find the perfect person suited for the role for a cheaper price.

They’ll keep you hanging on in suspense. The company doesn’t furnish you with an answer about your candidacy or offer a critique because you’re technically still in the running while they’re secretly holding out for a better candidate. They don’t want to say anything to make you bail out of the running—since they want to string you along and may ultimately want you if nobody better comes along. This is also a big reason why some interview processes tend to take so long.

Downsized HR Departments

The financial crisis wreaked havoc on all corporate departments, especially non-revenue-producing ones like human resources. Senior-level—higher salaried—HR people were downsized and replaced by more junior personnel.

Technology has also displaced many HR professionals. So, now there are fewer HR employees dealing with considerably more work. They simply don’t have enough time to respond to you and provide an evaluation and assessment of your talents.

New Expectations

The current generation of HR people only know the new, no-feedback milieu and perpetuates the status quo. This is a generalization, but many younger professionals are not comfortable picking up the phone and holding conversations with candidates, especially if it is not good news. They are equally uncomfortable holding a one-on-one conversation with a job seeker telling them that they’re not getting the job.

Third-Party Outsourcing

It has become a trend for companies to outsource their recruiting functions to third-party vendors. In this HR model, recruiters employed by another organization—who are kind of like mercenaries—are placed on the premises of many different clients. These are usually short-term stints. These types of recruiters, as you can imagine, have no vested interested in providing feedback to candidates, since they’ll be somewhere else in a couple of months.

Rudeness

You probably don’t need me to tell you this, but we are living in a time period in which people are not that nice to one another. It’s become the norm to be rude and ghost candidates.

We’re in a tight job market and companies complain that they can’t find people to fill their job openings. Their laments are ironic and tone-deaf as their very own actions of denying feedback alienates, discourages and blows off potentially perfect candidates.

Follow me on LinkedIn.

I am a CEO, founder, and executive recruiter at one of the oldest and largest global search firms in my area of expertise, and have personally placed thousands of professionals with top-tier companies over the last 20-plus years. I am passionate about advocating for job seekers. In doing so, I have founded a start-up company, WeCruitr, where our mission is to make the job search more humane and enjoyable. As a proponent of career growth, I am excited to share my insider interviewing tips and career advancement secrets with you in an honest, straightforward, no-nonsense and entertaining manner. My career advice will cover everything you need to know, including helping you decide if you really should seek out a new opportunity, whether you are leaving for the wrong reasons, proven successful interviewing techniques, negotiating a salary and accepting an offer and a real-world understanding of how the hiring process actually works. My articles come from an experienced recruiter’s insider perspective.

Source: The Real Reasons Why Job Seekers Are Not Given Feedback

56.9K subscribers
Job Search Strategies and Techniques – How To MASTER Your Job Search • FREE Sample Resume Template – The 6 Second Resume: https://heatheraustin.online/free-res… Ready to take it to the next level? Get the Career Advancement Toolkit TODAY: http://careertoolkit.win/ Have you submitted your resume and cover letter countless times and you still don’t have the job offer you’ve been waiting for? Are you looking for strategies that will accelerate your job search and help you land your dream job. If so, tune in, because in this video, you’ll learn 5 job search strategies that will help you tap into your professional network and fast track your job search. Watch this video to learn how to master your job search. The 5 job search strategies you’ll learn include: 1 – Use LinkedIn to network with others in your industry. 2 – Get your career documents ready. 3 – Develop your 30-second elevator pitch. 4 – Conduct Informational interviews. 5 – Follow-up. Videos I promised to share: LinkedIn Job Search Tutorial 2018 – How To Use LinkedIn To Find A Job https://youtu.be/Ox_ohqsIMAM Elevator Pitch Example – How To Create A Personal Elevator Pitch https://youtu.be/wVYyCUwDFhE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE VIDEOS LIKE THIS: https://goo.gl/WB86Ta Share this video with a friend: https://youtu.be/h_04pmxmHQc Join other professionals just like you striving to land higher-quality career opportunities: #TheCareerClub on Facebook – a private community: http://bit.ly/TheCareerClub CONNECT WITH ME: • https://www.professoraustin.com/https://www.instagram.com/professor_a…https://www.facebook.com/ProfessorAus…https://www.linkedin.com/in/heather-a… For more videos on how to improve your #jobsearch: Job Hunting Tips – Fastest Way To Get A Job | Job Hunting Secrets | https://youtu.be/UD1ps4HU9Do Executive Job Search – 7 Steps to Land a Senior Management Job | Linda Raynier | https://youtu.be/EkP8Oc0Fl38

How To Answer The Salary Question On Online Job Applications – And Other Common Job Search Negotiation Questions Answered

Just in time for Veterans’ Day, I led a negotiation workshop for female military veterans and military spouses, organized by American Corporate Partnes. ACP is a national non-profit that offers a broad array of career support to veterans and military spouses, so it’s worth checking out! Here are five job search negotiation questions that apply to both military and non-military job applicants:

1 – How do you address online applications that require a dollar figure and avoid being screened out?

Getting the salary question so early in the hiring process is one of the reasons to avoid online applications if you can help it. It’s hard to give a desired salary when you don’t know much about the job. The desired salary should always be about the job at hand, not what you were making before, what you hope to make, even what you think you deserve.

Therefore, if possible, try to get referred to someone and get a chance to speak with people to learn more specifics about the job before suggesting a salary. However, sometimes you don’t don’t have an existing connection into the company, and you want to apply before too many others apply. First, see if you can just skip the question or write a text response (such as “commensurate with responsibilities of the job”). If not, put a nonsensical number like $1 so that you can move past the question. If you get asked about the $1 response in the first interview, then you can mention that you need to learn more about the job fist before estimating the appropriate salary.

2 – How do you avoid mentioning a salary range during your first interview?

Today In: Leadership

Related to the first question, another attendee wanted to avoid giving a salary range, not just at the application stage, but even in the first interview. While I agree that you want to have as much detail about the job as possible before quoting a desired salary, you don’t want to avoid discussing salary at all costs. Some recruiters don’t move forward with a candidate if they don’t have an idea of target salary because the candidate might be too expensive and it’s a waste of everyone’s time. Refusing to discuss salary may prevent you from moving forward.

Therefore, you don’t want to avoid mentioning a salary range at all – just avoid mentioning a salary target too soon. Too soon is when you’re not clear about the job. It’s also too soon to discuss salary if you have not researched the market and may underestimate or overestimate your value. For that reason, you should be researching salaries now, even before you get into an interview situation. You don’t want to be caught unprepared to discuss salary. Your lack of readiness is a problem for you, not the employer.

3 – When during the interview process do you start negotiating the job salary?

Ideally you don’t mention salary until you are clear about the scope of the job. That said, mentioning a salary target is not the same as negotiating that particular job’s salary. Sure, it puts a number or range of numbers out there as a starting point, but you’re not bound to it. If you learn different information during the interview process that changes your view of an appropriate salary for that job, then you can still negotiate a different salary.

But don’t start negotiating a particular job’s salary until the employer has given you an offer or confirms that an offer is being put-together. Until the point you know that an employer wants you, your salary talk is all hypothetical. The majority of your interviews should be spent on the scope and responsibilities of the job, not any part of compensation (whether that’s salary or other type of compensation, such as bonus, benefits, time off, etc). You want to demonstrate that you’re interested in the role and making a contribution to that company, not just the salary or whatever else is in it for you.

4 – How do you negotiate differently for public sector v. private sector jobs?

When you do negotiate a particular job’s compensation, your approach should always be customized to that job, in that company and in that industry. Change the job, and you change the compensation and therefore the negotiation. Similarly, go from public sector to private sector, and you change the compensation and therefore how you should approach the negotiation.

One important difference between public and private sector jobs, in particular, is how compensation may be structured differently. A private sector job may offer equity or profit-sharing potential. That type of ownership element is not possible with a public sector job. Knowing this, you may take a lower base salary at a private job that’s offering equity compared to a similar public sector job that won’t offer that. Understanding the different elements available to your potential employers enables you to negotiate on those different terms. Negotiations at different employers will be different because you need to do customized research for each opportunity, consider different compensation structures for each and possibly propose different terms. This is true, not just for public v. private sector, but also start-up v. established company or companies in different geographies. Change the job, the company, the industry or sector, and you change the compensation.

5 – How do you negotiate salary when returning to a corporate position after consulting independently for several years?

When you’re making a career change, in this case consulting to corporate (but it could also be one industry to another or one role to a different one), it should not impact the compensation you receive. Tie the compensation to the scope of the job. Your background enables you to land the job or not. Once you are the one they want, your compensation should be what makes sense for that job, even if you have an atypical background by virtue of your career change.

This requires, of course, that you know what the job should pay. When you have been consulting for several years, you may be out of the loop on what in-house compensation looks like. You need to do research on current compensation, including salary, benefits and other perks for being in-house.

Negotiating a corporate position after consulting for a while also requires that you’re willing to stand your ground and negotiate. If you are too anxious to land an in-house position and get out of consulting, you might settle for less. This is where research can help again — set an appropriate target and don’t underestimate yourself. Having multiple job leads in your pipeline will also help you stay confident in the negotiation.


Remember, you can negotiate

The exact strategy or approach to best negotiate a job offer varies based on what you want, the job at hand, where you are in the negotiation and who you are negotiating with. However, even these general tips show that there are many actions you can take during a negotiation. With some research and preparation, you do have influence on the compensation you receive.

During the ACP workshop, we covered even more questions. In the next post, I’ll answer five more negotiation questions, this time about career management:

  • How to negotiate for flexibility
  • How to renegotiate when you accepted a lower salary years ago
  • How to keep your salary competitive after years in the same job
  • How to negotiate for fairness when your boss plays favorites
  • How negotiation changes when you go from employee to business owner

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website or some of my other work here.

As a longtime recruiter and now career coach, I share career tips from the employer’s perspective. My specialty is career change — fitting since I am a multiple-time career changer myself. My latest career adventures include running SixFigureStart, Costa Rica FIRE and FBC Films.

I am the author of Jump Ship: 10 Steps To Starting A New Career and have coached professionals from Amazon, Goldman Sachs, Google, McKinsey, Tesla, and other leading firms. I teach at Columbia University and created the online courses, “Behind The Scenes In The Hiring Process” and “Making FIRE Possible“.

I have appeared as a guest career expert on CNN, CNBC, CBS, FOX Business and other media outlets. In addition to Forbes, I formerly wrote for Money, CNBC and Portfolio.

Source: How To Answer The Salary Question On Online Job Applications – And Other Common Job Search Negotiation Questions Answered

 

475 subscribers
HOW TO ANSWER THE SALARY QUESTION ON A JOB APPLICATION // Do you come across a job you really want to apply to, only frozen by the question ‘What is your salary expectation?’ You’ve probably heard the first person to give a number loses – and you’re absolutely right! On top of that, your last salary or desired salary is none of their business until both parties agreed they are equally excited about one another. So how do you politely deflect this question? Watch this video for the answer! [RESOURCES & LINKS] FREE RESOURCE: Free worksheets, guides, and cheat sheets for your job search https://cultivitae.lpages.co/newslett… FREE STRATEGY SESSION: If you are interested in learning about career coaching (seeking a career transition or career advancement) book a free strategy session http://www.cultivitae.com/call FREE WORKSHOP: How to Snag Your Dream Job or Promotion THIS Quarter https://cultivitae.lpages.co/newslett… FREE COMMUNITY: Join our community, “Ultimate Career Support for Ambitious Corporate Professionals” Facebook Group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/culti… Say hi on social: Twitter: https://twitter.com/CultiVitae Instagram: http://instagram.com/cultivitae Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/cultivitae Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/emilycliou Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/cultivitae CultiVitae’s homepage: http://www.cultivitae.com Blog URL: http://cultivitae.com/2018/06/28/sala… YouTube URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eKbv…

I’ve Interviewed 300+ Successful Women. Here’s What I’ve Learned About Creating a Career You Love

Over the past few years, I’ve interviewed hundreds of successful women. They have every type of journey you could dream of: There are women who have reached the C-suite in Fortune 500 companies and well-funded startups, women who have started and run their own ventures, and women who have made dramatic career turnarounds.

They’re all extraordinarily unique, of course, but there’s one thing they have in common: They’ve charted the path to work that they love.

That doesn’t just mean big jobs with important tiles and sizable paychecks (though in some cases, that’s true). Instead, these women have thoughtfully built careers around their innate strengths, their personal passions, and the type of work that brings them meaning and purpose.

Yes, creating a career like this may seem like a lofty goal. But if there’s anything I’ve learned from these interviews over the years, it’s this: Every single one of us has the power to find work we love. It’s just a matter of confidently taking steps to get there. As Katie Fogarty, founder of The Reboot Group, shared on my Facebook Watch show, Work It: “Do not wait for people to give you permission. Seize your permission. Seize control of your career.”

Ready to get started? Straight from some of the most successful women in the world, here are five crucial lessons about taking the reins and crafting the professional life of your dreams.

Today In: Leadership

1. Expand Your Idea Of A Dream Job

Often, we have a pretty narrow view of our ultimate goals. We envision achieving a specific job title or working for a particular company. But what happens when we achieve that singular goal, and it doesn’t live up to expectations? That’s all too common—and so the most successful women I’ve interviewed have made it clear that it’s key to widen your perspective.

For example, Kristin Lemkau, Chief Marketing Officer of JPMorgan Chase & Co., emphasizes that it’s critical to be flexible when thinking about your dream job. If you’re only focused on getting your current boss’ job, for example, you may miss other options—inside or outside of your company. “By staying flexible and open,” she explains, “you might encounter an opportunity that you had never before considered.”

Lindsey Knowles, VP of Marketing at Winc Wines, echoes this sentiment. “Be open. And try different things. There’s so much you can’t know until you do it,” she shares. “Until you’ve been in a few different types of workplaces, you can’t know what your preferred working style is or the types of problems you like to solve.”

2. Pursue What Matters To You—Not To Anyone Else

Similarly, we’re conditioned to believe that the traditional markers of success, like money or a C-level title, will make us happy, too. But for most people, that’s not the full story. Instead, it’s key to dig deep and understand the very personal factors that drive meaning for you—whether that’s constantly learning new skills or being involved in radical social change—and pursue jobs that incorporate those elements.

According to Aditi Javeri Gokhale, Chief Marketing and Communications Officer at Northwestern Mutual, a good place to start is thinking about the people you want to work with and the issues you’re passionate about. “I have always identified with jobs where I have a good connection with my leaders, with the mission of the company, and with the team that surrounds me.” When you have that connection, it’s easier to excel at—and enjoy—a job, no matter what your title is.

3. Be Intentional About What You Say Yes To

Cathleen Trigg-Jones, journalist and founder of CatScape Productions, once explained to me her strategy for evaluating opportunities. She would yes to the things that would move her closer to her dreams, and she would say no to the things that didn’t serve her. (Even if they looked like good opportunities on paper!)

This simple rule can move you toward a career you love in two important ways. First, it pretty much guarantees that you get to do more of the work you’re excited about. Second, you get to incrementally step further away from the tasks you don’t enjoy and that don’t help you get where you want to go—even if there are certain aspects of them that may be tempting. Keep following this formula, and you will organically move in the right direction.

4. Don’t Be Afraid To Take Risks

If you want a meaningful professional life, you have to be willing to take risks. Why? “If you don’t do things because you’re scared to fail, you’re not really getting the best out of yourself,” Sabrina Macias, Senior Director of Global Communications at DraftKings, once told me. “Risk is healthy; it makes you more creative.”

A risky move, of course, doesn’t necessarily spending your life savings to start a company—maybe it’s accepting a position you’re not sure you’re qualified for, asking for more responsibility, or volunteering to head a bigger project than anything you’ve ever tackled.

Maybe it’s simply giving yourself permission to try something wildly different. Cindy Gallop, founder and CEO of MakeLoveNotPorn, explains the concept this way: “Stop and ask yourself what would make you happy, and design that.” That might be advocating for a new offering at your company or working on that creative side project you’ve been thinking about. “Just start doing it,” she said. “You’ll be amazed at how many people will be drawn to somebody who is doing things differently—and enabling other people to do things differently.” But that’s the key: You have to first be willing to do things differently.

5. Know That Change Is Inevitable

Finally, know this about career paths: What you want and what works for you is likely going to change over time. As Carol Lovell, founder and CEO of STOW put it: “The meaning of success for me has altered throughout my life. What you think it means at 25 is very different to what you know it means at 50.” The lesson? Don’t be afraid to adjust course when you realize that you’ve changed.

On a smaller scale, even if you have a specific goal you’re working toward, you’ll undoubtedly encounter new information, opportunities, and roadblocks that make you rethink your course. And that’s OK. “It’s not a matter of creating this rigid plan of like, do this step, do this step, no matter what,” explains former CEO and board director Shellye Archambeau. “And things will happen! There will be roadblocks, things will happen that’ll cause you to change and that’s okay. You have to be open to that.”

The road to a career you love isn’t easy. It requires saying no, taking risks, and sticking to your guns. But as a result, you’ll be doing the work you’re passionate about and building a life that works for you. Take it from hundreds of women: It’s worth it.

Carrie Kerpen is CEO and co-founder of Likeable Media, an award-winning digital agency that achieved Crain’s 6th “Best Place To Work in NYC.” She is the author of WORK IT: Secrets For Success From The Boldest Women In Business and the host of the popular podcast All the Social Ladies. Follow her on Twitter @carriekerpen or visit her at carriekerpen.com.

Source: I’ve Interviewed 300+ Successful Women. Here’s What I’ve Learned About Creating a Career You Love.

34.3K subscribers
After running through what to wear for a job interview with a friend, I thought it might be fun to run through some options depending on the kind of workplace you’re interviewing for. If you’ve got your own tips on what to wear to a job interview or if you have a go-to piece, I’d love to see it or know what it is! Hope you’re wonderful! X Jodie
%d bloggers like this: