COVID-19 Vaccines Don’t Contain Magnetic Ingredients; Dose Volume is Too Small To Contain Any Device Able To Hold a Magnet Through The Skin

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Around mid-May 2021, multiple videos (examples here, here, and here) claimed that COVID-19 vaccines caused magnetic reactions in vaccinated people. The videos purportedly showed that magnets attached to the arm where people received a COVID-19 vaccine, but not to the unvaccinated arm. The so-called “magnet challenge” went viral across social media platforms, including Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, receiving hundreds of thousands of interactions.
While some posts didn’t try to explain the phenomenon, others claimed that COVID-19 vaccines contained metals or microchips that attracted the magnets. None of the videos provided verification that the people appearing in them were actually vaccinated against COVID-19. Regardless of whether they received the COVID-19 vaccine or not, the claim that COVID-19 vaccines “magnetize” people is inaccurate and unsupported by scientific evidence, as we explain below.

None of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines contain magnetic ingredients

All materials react to magnetic fields in some way. However, these magnetic forces are, in general, so weak that most of these materials are effectively non-magnetic. Only a few metals, including iron, cobalt, nickel, and some steels, are considered truly magnetic and are attracted to magnets.

Lists of the ingredients in all the COVID-19 vaccines authorized for emergency use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are publicly available. The mRNA COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer and BioNTech and Moderna contain mRNA, lipids, salts, sugar, and substances that keep the pH stable. The COVID-19 vaccine from Johnson & Johnson contains an adenovirus expressing the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, amino acids, antioxidants, ethanol, an emulsifier, sugar, and salts. None of these ingredients are metals, and therefore, none of them are magnetic.

The Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine contains similar ingredients to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, but includes magnesium chloride as a preservative. Although magnesium is a metal, it is also non-magnetic, both in its elemental form and as magnesium chloride salt. In fact, higher amounts of magnesium are naturally present in the body, in many foods, and in dietary supplements, and they don’t cause magnetic reactions in people.

Finally, the volume of a COVID-19 vaccine dose is very small, ranging from 0.3 ml in the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine to 0.5 ml in the Moderna and Johnson and Johnson vaccines. According to experts, even if the vaccines contained a magnetic ingredient, the total amount would be insufficient to hold a magnet through a person’s skin. Michael Coey, a physics professor at Trinity College Dublin, explained to Reuters:

“You would need about one gram of iron metal to attract and support a permanent magnet at the injection site, something you would ‘easily feel’ if it was there […] By the way, my wife was injected with her second dose of the Pfizer vaccine today, and I had mine over two weeks ago. I have checked that magnets are not attracted to our arms!”

This Instagram video illustrates how a magnet (or any other small object) can stick to people’s skin without the need for any magnetic force.

Claims that COVID-19 vaccines contain microchips are unfounded

The claim that COVID-19 vaccines are magnetic because they contain microchips or tracking devices traces its roots to a conspiracy theory that has persisted throughout the pandemic. Despite being debunked many times, the baseless theory that COVID-19 vaccines include secret devices for tracking the population emerges from time to time in different forms.

Such claims led the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to explain on its website that COVID-19 vaccines don’t contain microchips or tracking devices:

“No, the government is not using the vaccine to track you. There may be trackers on the vaccine shipment boxes to protect them from theft, but there are no trackers in the vaccines themselves. State governments track where you got the vaccine and which kind you received using a computerized database to make sure you get all recommended doses at the right time. You will also get a card showing that you have received a COVID-19 vaccine.”

The claims that the COVID-19 vaccines contain magnetic microchips are incorrect for multiple reasons. First, any microchip contained in a COVID-19 vaccine would need to be small enough to fit through the syringe needle. Vaccination generally uses 22 to 25-gauge needles. “Gauge” indicates the size of the hole that runs down the middle of the needle.

The higher the gauge, the smaller the hole. These needles have a maximum inner diameter of 0.5 mm. Current microchips aren’t small enough to fit through the syringe needle. Second, even if a microchip of that size exists, it would be too small to hold a magnet through the skin, for the same reasons explained by Coey above.

Finally, all COVID-19 vaccines are supplied in multidose vials containing five to 15 doses, depending on the manufacturer (see dosing information from Pfizer and BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson). This would make it impossible to guarantee that all individuals receive a chip. Some people could receive several chips, while others receive none. Furthermore, many of the devices would likely remain in the vial or get stuck in the syringe.

Conclusion

Claims that COVID-19 vaccines cause magnetic reactions are unsubstantiated and implausible. COVID-19 vaccines authorized for emergency use by the FDA don’t contain metals or other magnetic ingredients that could cause a magnetic reaction in vaccinated individuals. Furthermore, no component or microchip that fits in the volume of a COVID-19 vaccine dose would be strong enough to hold a magnet through the skin.

By:

Source: COVID-19 vaccines don’t contain magnetic ingredients; dose volume is too small to contain any device able to hold a magnet through the skin – Health Feedback

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Future Careers Get A Much-Needed Shot In The Arm

Cognizant’s “Jobs of the Future Index” posts a 29% increase as tech-oriented job markets begin to return to normal, notes Robert Brown, a futurist within the company’s Center for the Future of Work. The US labor market is recovering faster than expected, as successful vaccination programs and stimulus dollars generate sweeping impacts throughout the nation.

The $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, together with the full inoculation of 51 million Americans by the close of the first quarter (and at least partial inoculation of more than 50% of the adult population by April’s end), are instilling confidence in both consumers and businesses. The accelerated use of and reliance on digital technology during the pandemic are now being accompanied by long-term investment in a digitally enabled workforce to meet the needs of tomorrow.

Cognizant’s “Jobs of the Future Index (CJoF Index)” tracks demand for 50 digitally enabled jobs of the future identified by Cognizant’s Center for the Future of Work, capturing the quarterly fluctuations in postings for these jobs. In the first quarter of 2021, the growth of the CJoF Index outpaced that of the Burning Glass jobs index by nearly 10%.

The CJoF increased 28.8% from the previous quarter (from an index figure of 1.22 to 1.57). The Burning Glass index posted a quarter-on-quarter increase of 18.9%, rising from 1.45 to 1.72. These are the greatest gains for either index in the past two years, signaling not only a strengthening labor market but also a larger shift from business survival to digital growth and expansion.

Note, however, that growth notwithstanding, digitally enabled job postings remain far below pre-pandemic levels. The CJoF Index posted a severe year-on-year decline of 22.2%, dropping from 2.02 in Q1 2020 (its highest value ever) to 1.57 in Q1 2021. Growth in digitally enabled positions, which broadly represent higher-wage earners and larger investments for employers, signals longer-term economic confidence — which has yet to be fully achieved.

In contrast, the demand for all jobs is on the verge of bouncing back; the Burning Glass index posted a negligible year-on-year decline of 2.8%. That’s because brick-and-mortar jobs have been more susceptible to business restrictions and lockdowns; they’re now seeing a rush of activity as the economy reopens.

A rising tide: Quarterly growth for all CJoF job families

In addition to total job openings, the CJoF Index monitors trends in eight job families: Algorithms, Automation and AI; Customer Experience; Environment; Fitness and Wellness; Healthcare; Legal and Financial Services; Transport; and Work Culture.

In the first quarter, all eight families registered quarter-on-quarter increases, with the most modest growth in Work Culture (14.5%) and Healthcare (18.5%). Over the quarter, Fitness and Wellness (137.8%) and Transport (38.0%) emerged as top-performing jobs families after experiencing the largest declines in Q4 2020.

Measured over the year, seven of eight families posted declines: Work Culture (-27.8%), Algorithms, Automation and AI (-24.3%), Transport (-16.9%), Customer Experience (-15.7%), Legal and Financial Services (-13.1%), Environmental (-2.8%), and Fitness and Wellness (-2.3%) all dropped. Healthcare (12.4%) was the only family in the CJoF Index to register year-on-year growth.

The Fitness and Wellness family posted the sharpest quarterly increase in job postings (+137.8%) thanks to especially strong growth in digitally enabled Caregiver/Personal Care Aide (249.5%) and Home Health Aide (156.5%) postings. These two job categories have experienced much volatility during the pandemic, running countercyclical with expectations for the progression of the virus.

During declines in the number of new COVID-19 cases in Q1 2021, patients underwent long-postponed elective and routine medical procedures, thereby increasing the demand for in-home care.

Also noteworthy was the Transport family, which realized the second-largest increase (38.0%), led by gains in job postings for Aerospace Engineer (47.6%) and Urban/Transportation Planner (42.1%). The most recent federal stimulus package provided a much-needed lifeline to the travel industry, which was hit hard by the pandemic.

Algorithms, Automation and AI, the largest family in the CJoF Index, realized a 28.3% gain over the quarter. Within this family, 15 of the 16 individual job indexes registered quarter-on-quarter growth. However, only five categories showed year-over-year expansion. Unsurprisingly, each of these also saw growth for the quarter in Q1 2021: Robotics Engineer (73.0%), Robotics Technician (50.2%), Chief Information Officer/Director of Information Technology (47.1%), Mechatronics Engineer (45.7%), and Data Scientist (+42.2%).

The pandemic dampened tech hiring despite the increased reliance on digital technologies to facilitate collaboration and interaction among remote workers. But experts predict that tech occupations will recover to their pre-pandemic strength in 2021 as organizations accelerate their adoption of cloud strategies and artificial intelligence (AI) solutions.

Quarterly ups and downs

In Q4 2020, the fastest-growing jobs in the CJoF Index were:

  • Caregiver/Personal Care Aide (+249.5%)
  • Home Health Aide (+156.5%)
  • Solar Engineer (+131.9%)
  • Sustainability Specialist (+126.1%)
  • Genetic Counselor (+123.3%)

Jobs that posted the largest declines for the quarter were:

  • Solar Installer (-22.4%)
  • Alternative Energy Manager (-20.8%)
  • Fashion Designer (-10.4%)
  • Surveillance Officer/Investigator (-4.6%)
  • Career Counselor (-2.1%)

Annual ups and downs

The fastest-growing jobs in the CJoF Index for the year ending with Q1 2021 were:

  • Solar Engineer (+263.3%)
  • Genetic Counselor (+123.3%)
  • Registered Nurse (+81.0%)
  • Solar Installer (+49.1%)
  • Sustainability Specialist (+39.0%)

Jobs that posted the largest declines during this period were:

  • Physician (-60.9%)
  • Career Counselor (-57.2%)
  • Fashion Designer (-42.3%)
  • Health Information Manager/Director (-35.4%)
  • Alternative Energy Manager (-34.5%)

We encourage you to review our overall index on a regular basis, as these COVID-19-driven shocks continue to alter the landscape of jobs of the future — and jobs of the now. Visit our Cognizant Jobs of the Future Index page to see the most up-to-date data and analysis.

Robert Hoyle Brown is a Vice President in Cognizant’s Center for the Future of Work and drives strategy and market outreach for Cognizant’s Business Process Services business unit. He is also a regular contributor to the CFoW blog. Prior to joining Cognizant, he was Managing Vice President of the Business and Applications Services team at Gartner, and as a research analyst, he was a recognized subject matter expert in BPO, cloud services/BPaaS and HR services. Robert also held roles at Hewlett-Packard and G2 Research, a boutique outsourcing research firm in Silicon Valley. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Berkeley and, prior to his graduation, attended the London School of Economics as a Hansard Scholar. He can be reached at Robert.H.Brown@cognizant.com

Source: Future Careers Get A Much-Needed Shot In The Arm

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Career Development Perspectives- Individual versus Organizational Needs

An individual’s personal initiatives that they pursue for their career development are primarily concerned with their personal values, goals, interests, and the path required to fulfill these desires. A degree of control and sense of urgency over a personal career development path can require an individual to pursue additional education or training initiatives to align with their goals.

In relation, John L. Holland’s 6 career anchors categorizes people to be investigative, realistic, artistic, social, enterprising, and conventional, in which the career path will depend on the characteristic that an individual may embody. The more aware an individual is of their personality type, the better alignment of career development and opportunities they may obtain.

The factors that influence an individual to make proper career goal decisions also relies on the environmental factors that are directly affecting them. Decisions are based on varying aspects affecting work-life balance, desires to align career options with their personal values, and the degree of stimulation or growth.

A corporate organization can be sufficient in providing career development opportunities through the Human Resources functions of Training and Development.The primary purpose of Training and Development is to ensure that the strategic planning of the organizational goals will remain adaptable to the demands of a changing environment.

Upon recruiting and hiring employees, an organization’s Human Resource department is responsible for providing clear job descriptions regarding the job tasks at hand required for the role, along with the opportunities of job rotation, transfers, and promotions. Hiring managers are responsible for ensuring that the subordinates are aware of their job tasks, and ensure the flow of communication remains efficient.

In relation, managers are also responsible for nurturing and creating a favorable work environment to work in, to foster the long term learning, development, and talent acquisition of their subordinates. Consequently, the extent to which a manager embraces the delegation of training and developing their employees plays a key factor in the retention and turnover of employees

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References

  • Driver., and Cooper, Michael J., and Ivan T. (1988). International review of industrial and organizational psychology. Los Angeles, CA: University of South California. pp. 245–277. ISBN 0-471-91844-X.
  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp. 2-4. ISBN 9781138786127.
  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp. 16-18. ISBN 9781138786127.
  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp. 20. ISBN 9781138786127.
  • Driver., and Cooper, Michael J., and Ivan T. (1988). International review of industrial and organizational psychology. Los Angeles, CA: University of South California. pp. 245–277. ISBN 0-471-91844-X.
  • “Task management”, Wikipedia, 2020-10-20, retrieved 2020-11-26
  • Driver., and Cooper, Michael J., and Ivan T. (1988). International review of industrial and organizational psychology. Los Angeles, CA: University of South California. pp. 245–277. ISBN 0-471-91844-X.
  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp. 16-17. ISBN 9781138786127.
  • “Hollands Occupational Personality Types” (PDF). hopkinsmedicine.org. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp. 19-20. ISBN 9781138786127.
  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp. 38-44. ISBN 9781138786127.
  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp. 38-41. ISBN 9781138786127.
  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp.46. ISBN 9781138786127.
  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp. 40-46. ISBN 9781138786127.
  • Barbose de Oliveira, Lucia; Cavazotte, Flavia; Dunzer, Rodrigo Alan (2019). “The interactive effects of organizational and leadership career management support on job satisfaction and turnover intention”. The International Journal of Human Resource Management. 30., no 10 (10): 1583–1603. doi:10.1080/09585192.2017.1298650 – via Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group.
  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp. 20-21. ISBN 9781138786127.
  • Barnett, R. C. and Hyde, J. S. 2001. “Women, Men, Work, and Family.” American Psychologist 56:781-796.Pope, M. (2009). Jesse Buttrick Davis (1871-1955): Pioneer of vocational guidance in the schools. Career Development Quarterly, 57, 278-288.

 

Vaccine Management Analytics: Will It Be The Next 2021 Data Story?

As the world enters the second year of the coronavirus pandemic, actionable insights are more critical than ever. They’re even being prioritized in the new National Strategy for COVID-19 Response and Pandemic Preparedness alongside executive orders to evaluate progress, monitor outcomes, and support transparency and equity with Americans.

As the world rolls out COVID-19 vaccines, the need for accurate and timely vaccination distribution and uptake data is top-of-mind for government leaders, public health organizations, and healthcare providers everywhere. These metrics are foundational for managing vaccination programs, measuring their effectiveness, and determining our collective progress toward “a blanket of herd immunity,” as described by Dr. Anthony Fauci, director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and chief medical advisor for the Biden Administration.

This is a “wartime effort,” as we’ve heard national leaders state recently, to protect population health—particularly the most vulnerable—as well as to contain the virus as we lower case counts toward zero and to restore Americans’ trust with different discourse. By creating public performance dashboards for more transparency and accountability, and prioritizing a data-driven approach in the efforts and decisions of federal, state and local governments, vaccine management analytics is already the data story of 2021.

Vaccine Management Analytics In The Spotlight

Effective management of any vaccine distribution program requires a holistic picture of the vaccine supply chain, the populations being prioritized, the success rate in reaching those populations, and the strengths and weaknesses of the metrics used to measure progress and performance.

On the path to recovery, government leaders, the public and private sector, and healthcare providers have realized that vaccine administration and management is a complex, evolving process. Expecting we could implement it overnight with a one-size-fits-all approach was unrealistic—some may say foolish—and we must ask some of these important questions as we press forward:

  • Where is the greatest vaccine reluctance based on rate of spread and case count?
  • How do we prioritize population groups for immunization and maintain equity?
  • What level of awareness and understanding exists around vaccine safety and efficacy?
  • How does vaccine supply match demand?
  • In which direction are immunizations tracking and impacting COVID spread?
  • Are vaccine sites known and sufficiently equipped and staffed?

As we create the path to normalcy, with increased access, use and communication with data and analytics, we can elevate our national and local pandemic response and make better vaccine management decisions that have a national and global impact.

For several months, I’ve conversed with government leaders and health officials, considering their concerns and questions and discussing how data analytics can assuage them. With those engagements top-of-mind, I’d like to highlight:

  • Some effective vaccine management dashboard examples that states are leveraging for their needs and situations
  • How some states are using data and analytics to achieve positive outcomes

Using Data To Guide COVID-19 Vaccine Management

Furthermore, with increased plans to expand vaccine manufacturing and purchases, and improve national allocation, distribution, administration and tracking, there will be more data for government leaders to capture, monitor and share for a clearer sense of how localized efforts impact national goals, benchmarks and reporting.

The national vaccine effort is one of the greatest operational challenges America has faced. As we prioritize data and visual analytics in our response and resolution, our learnings can help frame how we approach future events and crises. The dashboard examples that I’ll share, containing sample data, demonstrate how data informs vaccine management, but the same analytics principles and approach could be applied to management of other national challenges.

Tracking Performance Against Vaccine Goals

Do you need to pivot local attention to track down more vaccines or other treatment supplies? Are mortality rates on the rise, unexpectedly? Is there a certain community that needs increased attention? Do we need additional marketing and public outreach to overcome vaccine reluctance and hesitancy? These questions and more are weighing on the minds and hearts of our leaders and public health officials and can be explored through solutions like a performance management dashboard, shown below.

By tracking performance in this way, it’s easier to take a snapshot of local progress to see if a state will meet, exceed or fall short of vaccine goals. It is also an effective communication tool for governors, mayors or county executives to be transparent with constituents and the public in their briefings and updates…….Read more

By:  Srinivas Kosaraju, Senior Director, Public Sector, Solution Engineers, Tableau Software

Source: Vaccine Management Analytics: Will It Be The Next 2021 Data Story?

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The mRNA Vaccines Are Looking Better and Better

 

A year ago, when the United States decided to go big on vaccines, it bet on nearly every horse, investing in a spectrum of technologies. The safest bets, in a way, repurposed the technology behind existing vaccines, such as protein-based ones for tetanus or hepatitis B. The medium bets were on vaccines made by Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca, which use adenovirus vectors, a technology that had been tested before but not deployed on a large scale. The long shots were based on the use of mRNA, the newest and most unproven technology.

The protein-based vaccines have moved too slowly to matter so far. J&J’s and AstraZeneca’s vaccines are effective at preventing COVID-19—but a small number of recipients have developed a rare type of blood clot that appears to be linked to the adenovirus technology and may ultimately limit those shots’ use.

Meanwhile, with more than 180 million doses administered in the U.S, the mRNA vaccines have proved astonishingly effective and extremely safe. The unusual blood clots have not appeared with Pfizer’s or Moderna’s mRNA technology. A year later, the risky bet definitely looks like a good one.

The U.S. has ordered enough mRNA vaccines to inoculate its entire population. In that context, the CDC and FDA’s call to pause the J&J rollout this week is a blow to the American inoculation campaign, but hardly a devastating one. (J&J’s vaccine accounts for less than 5 percent of doses administered so far, and AstraZeneca’s has not yet been authorized in the U.S.) But the rest of the world has been banking on the J&J and AstraZeneca vaccines, which are both cheaper and easier to distribute because they don’t require the same cold storage as mRNA vaccines.

If the blood-clot risk is real, the divide between the mRNA-vaccine haves and have-nots will only grow. The U.S. will be fine; the rest of the world will face difficult questions about balancing the risks and benefits of an affordable, good-but-not-best vaccine against a disease that has killed nearly 3 million people.

The blood-clot events with the AstraZeneca and J&J vaccines are so rare—appearing in one in 100,000 to one in 1 million vaccine recipients—that they would not have shown up in clinical trials, even ones conducted within more leisurely, non-pandemic timelines. (The COVID-19 vaccine trials, which generally included tens of thousands of participants each, were actually unusually large because researchers wanted data as quickly as possible.)

“It’s true with all new medications of any sort. You only find rare events when things are rolled out to very vast numbers of people,” says John Grabenstein, the associate director of scientific communication for the Immunization Action Coalition, who used to work on vaccines for the pharmaceutical giant Merck. “One-in-a-million events are just barely measurable.” That faint signal is especially difficult to see against a noisy background: Some people get blood clots for reasons unrelated to the vaccine, too.

In Europe, the strange nature of these blood clots tipped doctors off to a possible link to AstraZeneca’s vaccine. The patients with clots also had low numbers of platelets, which are tiny blood cells that help with clotting. Normally, someone with a low platelet count cannot form clots and bleeds as a result. But in these people, who had all recently gotten an AstraZeneca shot, an immune reaction may have set off uncontrolled clotting that bound up all their platelets.

Some scientists now hypothesize that the immune reaction is triggered by some part of the adenovirus-vector technology. If that’s true, these blood clots might show up as a rare side effect with other adenovirus-vector vaccines. But they clearly are very infrequent. The AstraZeneca and J&J coronavirus vaccines are the first adenovirus-vector shots to even be deployed widely enough in the U.S. and Europe for such rare events to emerge, but vaccines including Russia’s Sputnik V,  China’s CanSino, and J&J’s Ebola vaccine also use the technology.

mRNA vaccines are similarly new, but they have so far racked up a good safety record. So many doses have been administered that these unusual blood clots—or any serious one-in-a-million event—would very likely have shown up by now. Back in December, experts quickly noticed and warned the public about a handful of severe allergic reactions to the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, which is why vaccination sites now monitor recipients for 15 to 30 minutes after the jab.

In addition, doctors have picked up on a possible one-in-a-million risk of a bleeding disorder called immune thrombocytopenia, which happens when the immune system attacks platelets after vaccination. (It’s a rare but documented side effect of some other vaccines, such as the one against measles.) These patients do have low platelet counts, but they do not have the accompanying blood clots that seem unique to adenovirus-vector vaccines.

Immune thrombocytopenia is easily diagnosed and treated, James Bussel, a pediatrics professor at Weill Cornell Medicine who studies the condition, told me in an email. But the unusual combination of blood clots and low platelets is trickier. For example, one standard treatment for clots is a blood thinner called heparin, but the drug can, in very rare cases, cause the exact combination of low platelets and blood clots that doctors are concerned about. Experts now fear that heparin might make the potential vaccine reaction even worse. This combined condition also seems to be more dangerous than immune thrombocytopenia, but the prognosis may improve as more doctors learn how to treat it.

U.S. officials expect the J&J pause to last no more than a few days, as experts review the safety data and potentially revise recommendations. After a similar pause and review of the AstraZeneca data in Europe, several countries restricted that vaccine to older residents. (Most of the 86 blood-clot cases observed with the AstraZeneca vaccine in Europe were in women under 60, as were all six cases observed with the J&J vaccine in the U.S.) The U.K. now recommends that people younger than 30 be offered a different vaccine if possible.

The recommendations take into account individual risk: For older people at high risk of severe COVID-19 complications, the benefits of the vaccine clearly outweigh the risks of a blood clot. But for young people at lower risk from the coronavirus, the benefits are not so clear. For regulators, that balance also depends on whether a country has any other vaccines available and the severity of its local COVID-19 outbreak. The European Union and the U.K. do not have as many mRNA vaccines as the U.S., and less wealthy nations have even less supply. Ultimately, every country will have to do its own benefit-risk calculation.

The U.S.’s recommendations may end up diverging from other countries’, but they may also influence them. Sean O’Leary, a pediatrician at the University of Colorado and a liaison to the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, notes two historical examples. Although the United States has discontinued use of the oral polio vaccine—which is more effective and easier to administer than the shot, but also carries a one in 2.5 million risk of paralysis after infection with the live virus in the oral vaccine—the World Health Organization continues to recommend it in countries where polio is endemic.

But when the U.S. in 1999 stopped using a vaccine against rotavirus because of rare reports of intestinal blockage, the rest of the world fell in line, despite the fact that the virus was killing about half a million kids worldwide each year. “The decision was made, essentially, if it’s not good enough for you, it’s not good enough for us,” O’Leary says. Eventually, two newer rotavirus vaccines with a lower risk of complications were developed. They are now used in the U.S. and around the world.

With rotavirus, the vaccine conundrum became moot as new alternatives became available. With COVID-19, those alternatives already exist in the form of mRNA vaccines. There was no guarantee that the mRNA shots would be ready so quickly, or turn out to be so good and so safe. That they did is a great stroke of luck. But in the near future, the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines’ limited supply, high price, and distribution challenges will make them functionally unavailable to much of the world. The U.S. can afford, literally, to vaccinate most of its population with Pfizer’s and Moderna’s vaccines. Most other countries cannot.

 

By: Sarah Zhang

Source: Johnson & Johnson Blood Clots Make mRNA Vaccines Look Great – The Atlantic

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[…] While studies have not yet been done, based on how mRNA vaccines work experts believe they are unlikely to pose a risk for people who are pregnant. mRNA vaccines do not contain the live virus that causes COVID-19 and therefore cannot give someone COVID-19 […] There are no data on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in lactating women or on the effects of mRNA vaccines on the breastfed infant or on milk production/excretion. mRNA vaccines are not thought to be a risk to the breastfeeding infant […]
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[…] additionally introduced final week it will present A$50 million to arrange native manufacturing of mRNA vaccines in Australia. It is possible provide chain points may additionally affect native manufacturing of mRNA vaccines. So what are the lacking provides for making mRNA vaccines? The shortages slowing mRNA vaccine manufacturing 1. mRNA manufacturing and capping Manufacturing mRNA vaccines is sort of like making a automotive, with an meeting line and lots of steps […]
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[…] More dirty and deadly mRNA vaccines are on the way for the sheeple of the world Expect the coronavirus vaccines to keep getting worse […]
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[…] that evidence does not support claims that auto-immune illnesses or lung damage are triggered by mRNA vaccines […] ” Scientists have widely rejected the unsubstantiated claim that mRNA vaccines can modify human DNA, and AFP Fact Check has debunked other social media posts sharing the fals […] at the IMBECU-CCT-CONICET Immunology and Vaccine Development Laboratory in Argentina, said that the mRNA vaccines cannot penetrate a person’s genes […]
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[…] mRNA vaccines include the already approved Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines […]   How do the new mRNA vaccines work? What messenger RNA vaccines do is introduce into our cells a gene sequence that codes fo […] In this sense, some cases of anaphylaxis have been reported, particularly with he mRNA vaccines (Pfizer or Moderna), but they are fortunately very rare: 66 cases after 18 million dose […]
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[…] with shortages of vital components is leading to bottlenecks in the supply chain of this and other mRNA vaccines, delaying vaccine supplies […] government also announced last week it would provide A$50 million to set up local manufacturing of mRNA vaccines in Australia. It’s feasible supply chain issues could also impact local manufacturing of mRNA vaccines. So what are the missing supplies for making mRNA vaccines? Read more: What is mRNA? The messenger molecule that’s been in every living cell for billions o […]
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Can the Covid Vaccine Protect Me Against Virus Variants?

Vaccines do a good job of protecting us from coronavirus, but fear and confusion about the rise of variants have muddled the message. Here are answers to common questions.

The news about coronavirus variants can sound like a horror movie, with references to a “double-mutant” virus, “vaccine-evading” variants and even an “Eek” mutation. One headline warned ominously: “The devil is already here.”

While it’s true that the virus variants are a significant public health concern, the unrelenting focus on each new variant has created undue alarm and a false impression that vaccines don’t protect us against the various variants that continue to emerge.

“I use the term ‘scariants,’” said Dr. Eric Topol, professor of molecular medicine at Scripps Research in La Jolla, Calif., referring to much of the media coverage of the variants. “Even my wife was saying, ‘What about this double mutant?’ It drives me nuts. People are scared unnecessarily. If you’re fully vaccinated, two weeks post dose, you shouldn’t have to worry about variants at all.”

Viruses are constantly changing, and new variants have been emerging and circulating around the world throughout the pandemic. Some mutations don’t matter, but others can make things much worse by creating a variant that spreads faster or makes people sicker. While the rise of more infectious variants has caused cases of Covid-19 to surge around the world, the risk is primarily to the unvaccinated, for whom there is great concern. While vaccination efforts are well underway in the United States and many other developed countries, huge swaths of the world’s population remain vulnerable, with some countries yet to report having administered a single dose.

But for the vaccinated, the outlook is much more hopeful. While it’s true that the vaccines have different success rates against different variants, the perception that they don’t work against variants at all is incorrect. In fact, the available vaccines have worked remarkably well so far, not just at preventing infection but, most important, at preventing serious illness and hospitalization, even as new variants circulate around the globe.

The variants are “all the more reason to get vaccinated,” said Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease specialist. “The bottom line is the vaccines we are using very well protect against the most dominant variant we have right now, and to varying degrees protect against serious disease among several of the other variants.”

Part of the confusion stems from what vaccine efficacy really means and the use of terms like “vaccine evasion,” which sounds a lot scarier than it is. In addition, the fact that two vaccines have achieved about 95 percent efficacy has created unrealistic expectations about what it takes for a vaccine to perform well.

Here are answers to common questions about the variants and the vaccines being used to stop Covid-19.

The variant called B.1.1.7, which was first identified in Britain, is now the most common source of new infections in the United States. This highly contagious variant is also fueling the spread of the virus in Europe and has been found in 114 countries. A mutation allows this version of the virus to more effectively attach to cells. Carriers may also shed much higher levels of virus and stay infectious longer.

The main concern about B.1.1.7 is that it is highly infectious and spreads quickly among the unvaccinated, potentially overwhelming hospitals in areas where cases are surging.

All of the major vaccines in use — Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson, AstraZeneca, Sputnik and Novavax — have been shown to be effective against B.1.1.7. We know this from a variety of studies and indicators. First, scientists have used the blood of vaccinated patients to study how well vaccine antibodies bind to a variant in a test tube. The vaccines have all performed relatively well against B.1.1.7.

There’s also clinical trial data, particularly from Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca (which is the most widely used vaccine around the world), that shows they are highly effective against both preventing infection and serious illness in areas where B.1.1.7 is circulating. And in Israel, for instance, where 80 percent of the eligible population is vaccinated (all with the Pfizer shot), case counts are plummeting, even as schools, restaurants and workplaces open up, suggesting that vaccines are tamping down new infections, including those caused by variants.

No vaccine is foolproof, and even though the Covid vaccines are highly protective, sometimes vaccinated people still get infected. But breakthrough cases of vaccinated people are very rare, even as variants are fueling a surge in case counts. And the vaccines prevent severe illness and hospitalization in the vast majority of the vaccinated patients who do get infected.

So what’s the risk of getting infected after vaccination? Nobody knows for sure, but we have some clues. During the Moderna trial, for instance, only 11 patients out of 15,210 who were vaccinated got infected. Both Pfizer and Moderna now are doing more detailed studies of breakthrough cases among vaccinated trial participants, and should be releasing that data soon.

Two real-world studies of vaccinated health care workers, who have a much higher risk of virus exposure than the rest of us, offer hopeful signs. One study found that just four out of 8,121 fully vaccinated employees at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas became infected. The other found that only seven out of 14,990 workers at UC San Diego Health and the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, tested positive two or more weeks after receiving a second dose of either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines.

Both reports were published in the New England Journal of Medicine, and are a sign that even as cases were surging in the United States, breakthrough cases were uncommon, even among individuals who were often exposed to sick patients. Most important, patients who were infected after vaccination had mild symptoms. Some people had no symptoms at all, and were discovered only through testing in studies or as part of their unrelated medical care.

A recent C.D.C. report found that after 75 million people had been fully vaccinated, there were 5,814 documented cases of breakthrough infections, including 74 deaths. More details about those patients weren’t available, although at least nine of them died of causes other than Covid-19.

Researchers are still studying whether the variants eventually might increase the number of breakthrough cases or if vaccine antibodies begin to wane over time. So far, data from Moderna show the vaccine still remains 90 percent effective after at least six months. Pfizer has reported similar results.

For now, the variants don’t appear to be increasing the rate of infection in vaccinated people, but that could change as more data are collected. Read more about breakthrough cases here.

The C.D.C. is tracking more than a dozen variants, but only a few qualify as “variants of concern,” which is a public health designation to identify variants that could be more transmissible or have other qualities that make them more of a risk. The main additional variants everyone is talking about right now are the B.1.351, which was first detected in South Africa, and the P.1, which was first identified in Brazil.

While there are other variants (including two “California” variants, B.1.427 and B.1.429, and a New York variant, B.1.526), for now, it seems that the South Africa and Brazil variants (which as of late March together accounted for about 2 percent of cases in the United States) are causing the most concern. While a new variant can emerge at any time, existing variants also compete with each other for dominance. One interesting new development: In countries like the United States where B.1.1.7 is dominant, some of the other variants seem to be getting crowded out, making them less of a worry.

There is a concern that the B.1.351 and the P.1 are better at dodging vaccine antibodies than other variants. But that doesn’t mean the vaccines don’t work at all. It just means the level of protection you get from the vaccines against these variants could be lower than when the shots were studied against early forms of the virus. Among the variants, the B.1.351 may pose the biggest challenge so far. It has a key mutation — called E484K, and often shortened to “Eek” — that can help the virus evade some, but probably not all, antibodies.

A recent study of 149 people in Israel who became infected after vaccination with the Pfizer vaccine suggested that B.1.351 (the variant first identified in South Africa) was more likely to cause breakthrough infections. However, those eight infections occurred between days seven and 13 following the second dose.

“We didn’t see any South Africa variant 14 days after the second dose,” said Adi Stern, the study’s senior author, a professor at the Shmunis School of Biomedicine and Cancer Research, Tel Aviv University. “It was a small sample size, but it’s very possible that two weeks after the second dose, maybe the protection level goes up and that blocks the South Africa variant completely. It gives us more room for optimism.”

Remember that there’s a lot of “cushion” provided by this current crop of vaccines, so even if a vaccine is less effective against a variant, it appears that it’s still going to do a good job of protecting you from serious illness.

We don’t yet have precise estimates of vaccine effectiveness against B.1.351, which may be the most challenging variant so far. But studies show that the various vaccines still lower overall risk for infection and help prevent severe disease. A large study of Johnson & Johnson’s one-dose vaccine in South Africa found it was about 85 percent effective at preventing severe disease, and lowered risk for mild to moderate disease by 64 percent.

(Distribution of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine has been paused as health officials investigate safety concerns.) The AstraZeneca vaccine did not do much to protect against mild illness caused by B.1.351, but scientists said they believed the vaccine might protect against more severe cases, based on the immune responses detected in blood samples from people who were given it.

There’s less definitive research for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines against the variant, but it’s believed that these two-dose vaccines could reduce risk of infection against the variant by about 60 percent to 70 percent and still are highly effective at preventing severe disease and hospitalization.“From everything we know today, there is still protection from the vaccines against the South Africa variant,” said Dr. Stern.

Part of the problem is that we misinterpret what efficacy really means. When someone hears the term “70 percent efficacy,” for instance, they might wrongly conclude that it means 30 percent of vaccinated people would get sick. That’s not the case. Even if a vaccine loses some ground to a variant, a large portion of people are still protected, and only a fraction of vaccinated people will get infected. Here’s why.

To understand efficacy, consider the data from the Pfizer clinical trials. In the unvaccinated group of 21,728, a total of 162 people got infected. But in the vaccinated group of 21,720, only eight people became infected. That’s what is referred to as 95 percent efficacy. It doesn’t mean that 5 percent of the participants (or 1,086 of them) got sick. It means 95 percent fewer vaccinated people had confirmed infections compared to the unvaccinated group.

Now imagine a hypothetical scenario with a vaccine that is 70 percent effective against a more challenging variant. Under the same conditions of the clinical trial, vaccination would still protect 21,672 people in the group, and just 48 vaccinated people — less than one percent — would become infected, compared to 162 in the unvaccinated group. Even though overall efficacy was lower, only a fraction of vaccinated people in this scenario would get sick, most likely with only mild illness.

While far more research is needed to fully understand how variants might dodge some (but not all) vaccine antibodies, public health experts note that an estimate of 50 percent to 70 percent efficacy against a challenging variant would still be considered an adequate level of protection.

“Seventy percent is extremely high,” said Dr. Stern. “Basically what this means is that it’s even more important to get vaccinated. If you have 95 percent efficacy, you can create some form of herd immunity with less people. With 70 percent efficacy, it’s even more important to get vaccinated to protect others.”

Vaccine makers already are working on developing booster shots that will target the variants, but it’s not clear how soon they might be needed. “In time, you’re going to see a recommendation for a booster,” said Dr. Peter J. Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. “That booster will elevate everybody’s antibodies and increase durability. The booster will probably be configured to target the South African and Brazil variants.”

Even amid the rise of variants, vaccines will significantly lower your risk for infection and will protect you from serious illness and hospitalization. People who are vaccinated can socialize, unmasked, with other vaccinated people. While vaccinated people still need to follow local health guidelines about wearing a mask and gathering in groups to protect the unvaccinated, vaccinated people can travel, get their hair and nails done, or go to work without worrying. And vaccinated grandparents can hug their unvaccinated grandchildren. Because there are still some outstanding questions about the risk of vaccinated people carrying the virus, a vaccinated person is still advised to wear a mask in public to protect the unvaccinated — although those guidelines may be updated soon.

“The vaccines protect you, so go get vaccinated — that’s the message,” said Dr. Fauci. “If you’re around other vaccinated people, you shouldn’t worry about it at all. Zero.”

Tara Parker-Pope

 

By: Tara Parker-Pope

 

Source: Can the Covid Vaccine Protect Me Against Virus Variants?

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COVID-19: Does The Indian Variant Make Vaccines Less Effective & How Concerned Should We Be?

A new double mutation COVID-19 variant is thought to be behind a sudden surge in cases in India that has overwhelmed hospitals. The variant was only confirmed on 25 March by the Indian government so the data are still not 100% clear on its effects when compared to existing forms of the virus.

However, scientists and doctors are concerned this particular variant could be more transmissible and may even make vaccines less effective. A total of 182 cases have been detected in the UK, 162 in the five weeks up to 16 April, forcing Boris Johnson to postpone his trip to India and the government to add it to its travel “red list”. Sky News looks at what we know about the new variant.

What is the new variant?

Its official name is B.1.617, but is being called the Indian variant.Viruses regularly mutate but most are insignificant, however, some mutations can make the virus more infectious, deadly or resistant to vaccines. The Indian virus is one of those – especially because two mutations have come together to help infect cells and evade the immune system.

It has evolved independently but has the same mutation as the Californian variant and nearly the same as the South African and Brazil/Manaus ones. In lab tests, the South African variant (B.1.351) and Brazil variant (P.1) both have a key mutation, E484K, which can help the virus evade antibodies produced by vaccines or by having had COVID-19. It is also more transmissible.

The Californian variant (B.1.429), discovered in December, carries the L452R mutation that makes it about 20% more infectious. The Indian variant has the E484Q mutation, which is very similar to the one found in the South African and Brazil variants, and also has the L452R mutation found in the Californian one.

What is happening in India?

Cases in India have risen rapidly since mid-March after weeks of steady decline. There were more than 280,000 new infections on Sunday, nearly triple the previous high seen in September. Deaths have also been rising to more than 1,000 every day since 13 April. Hospitals are becoming overrun and they are running out of ventilators, with New Delhi placed under a week’s strict lockdown from 19 April.

There is a worry India’s second wave is even worse than appears, as scientists are concerned about figures being under-reported. India also does not have as comprehensive a genome sequencing programme as the UK so cases of the Indian variant there are likely to be higher than reported.

“The exponential rise is quite staggering,” Dr Deepti Gurdasani, clinical epidemiologist and senior lecturer in machine learning at Queen Mary University of London, told Sky News. “We first saw the rise in Maharashtra state, then other states are seeing a rise. “What seems quite clear is there’s a rise and the new variant has become dominant in India.”

Is the Indian variant more transmissible and will vaccines still work against it?

Dr Gurdasani, who trained as a doctor and worked in India for 10 years, said it is “very likely it’s more transmissible”. She said: “There are two mutations here. The first is similar to the Manaus variant and we know that is affecting vaccine effectiveness. “The second is the same as the Californian, which has been associated in labs with escaping immunity – both of antibodies and T-cells – and also increased transmissibility.”

She continued: “This is quite worrying, it builds a really concerning picture as it ticks all the boxes for rising cases and outcompeting the vaccine. “We don’t have definitive data but we can see from the other variants there’s more than enough to be concerned about.”

Dr Gurdasani added that the Indian variant shares the same mutation as both the South African and Manaus variants, which has been associated with a reduction of effectiveness in the Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson and Johnson and Novavax vaccines.

A variant of Covid-19 in India had led to a surge in cases in the country, prompting the UK to add the country to its red list of travel destinations. It means Brits who have been to India in the last 10 days need to quarantine in a hotel for 10 days after arriving in the UK. Non-UK residents who have recently been to India are barred from entering the country. Natalia Jorquera explains. • Subscribe to ITV News on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2lOHmNj • Get breaking news and more stories at http://www.itv.com/news Follow ITV News on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/itvnews/ Follow ITV News on Twitter: https://twitter.com/itvnews Follow ITV News on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/itvnews/
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Should people in the UK be concerned?

Boris Johnson has postponed his trip to India due to the surge in cases and shortly after, India was added to the UK’s “red list”, where arrivals from certain countries have to go into hotel quarantine. Several scientists have called for India to be on the red list, including Dr Gurdasani, although she added that the system “doesn’t work because by the time a variant is here, it’s too late”.

“Because we are so far into our vaccination programme and if this variant means a lower vaccine effectiveness, if this becomes dominant in the UK it will be catastrophic,” she added. “India did not take pre-emptive action and the situation is really dire – we need to start acting before it gets as bad as India.”

Professor Christina Pagel, a member of the Independent Sage committee and director of clinical operational research at University College London, had also called for India to be on the red list. She said if the UK’s vaccination programme goes to plan it will still be the end of July before every adult has one dose, as she added that since UK schools opened, the Indian variant is the fastest growing.

It is doubling every week, as did the Kent variant when it was detected in September, but is doing so under “much tighter restrictions and more vaxxed people”, she said. The British government has said the Indian variant is a “variant under investigation”, not a “variant of concern”, due to a lack of evidence, so surge testing or forensic contact tracing are not taking place.

Prof Pagel said: “Because we are very good at sequencing, we might be the first country to provide such definitive evidence. But by the time we do, B.1.617 is likely to be quite widespread and it might be too late to contain it.”She predicts that with the current growth rate, the Indian variant could be dominant by the end of June.

By: 

Source: COVID-19: Does the Indian variant make vaccines less effective and how concerned should we be? | UK News | Sky News

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How The COVID Vaccine and Regular Exercise May Increase Effectiveness

And while we’re still waiting for similar studies with COVID-19 vaccines, there’s good reason to believe the same effects would apply, says University of Sydney associate professor of exercise science Kate Edwards, who has extensively researched the links between vaccines and exercise.

Exercise and your immune system

First, it’s important to understand the profound effects of exercise on the immune system. One, Edwards says, is that it puts more immune cells – which kill infected cells and produce antibodies to destroy viral and bacterial antigens – on patrol in the body’s blood circulation. Also, when you work out, your muscles release signalling molecules, called myokines, that help put our body’s defences on high alert. Over the long-term, regular exercise means having a stronger, more responsive immune system.

And this has had repercussions during the pandemic. A US study, published this week in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, examined almost 50,000 patients and concluded that aside from old age or a past organ transplant, physical inactivity was the biggest risk factor for severe symptoms. People who didn’t exercise were more than twice as likely to be hospitalised compared to those who clocked up at least 150 minutes of activity every week. They were also 2.5 times more likely to die of the infection.

The effects of exercise on vaccines

Given all this, it’s perhaps unsurprising that exercise has been shown to improve the efficacy of vaccines. “We see that regular exercise over the course of weeks or months makes vaccine responses stronger and that likely then means you are more protected from the disease,” Edwards says.

A study published last year found that elite athletes had significantly more anti-influenza immune cells after a flu shot compared to other healthy adults. This echoed a 2019 study finding that older adults who trained regularly had a much higher antibody response to healthy adults who didn’t exercise. Consistent exercise after a vaccine is also thought to prolong enhanced protection.

“Vaccination does cause an immune response but because we have more of these immune cells [when we exercise], it’s a much more powerful response,” says Rob Newton, professor of exercise medicine at Edith Cowan University.

Interestingly, exercising on the day of a vaccine has also shown benefits. There’s less evidence for this, Edwards says, but her research suggests it may lead to a stronger immune response, particularly from doing arm movements in the hours before injection.

“You are likely to get more immune cells moving to pick up the vaccine … but also by exercising the muscles where you’ll get the vaccine means you release those immune signals and so it may draw the cells to that location as well.”

“The key is that exercise has no downsides. It gives benefits regardless and the evidence is so strong in a range of other vaccines.”

Professor Rob Newton

What’s even more startling is that being active close to the time of a vaccination – such as flu or HPV – has been found to reduce the risk of suffering from adverse reactions to the jab. Edwards says the effects were observed simply with 15 minutes of moderate resistance band exercise, probably because the immune system was primed and ready for a challenge.

“I would expect exercise in the hour before vaccination and the short period after would have the same effect,” Edwards says. This may be particularly valuable for people who are compromised through age or illness, Newton says.

Preparing for your COVID-19 vaccine

Of course, while this is all compelling evidence, Newton says we can’t be sure the same will apply to COVID-19 vaccines, particularly those that use new mRNA technology, such as Pfizer. “But those pathways still require the involvement of the immune system and the activation of immune cells,” Newton says. “[And] exercise distributes immune factors through the body.”

Newton is frank when he explains how he’ll approach his own COVID-19 vaccine: “I’m already exercising regularly and when it’s my turn to get a vaccination I can tell you I’ll be exercising before I head off to the medical clinic.” He suggests people follow his lead: “The key is that exercise has no downsides. It gives benefits regardless and the evidence is so strong in a range of other vaccines.”

“If you’re particularly worried about a vaccine working well, then exercise is a really good thing to do, but remember it’s important for … all sorts of things.”

Associate Professor Kate Edwards

Edwards agrees: “Certainly what we’ve never seen is exercise making anything worse: immune response or side-effects.” Edwards says because researchers are still exploring why some people are experiencing COVID-19 vaccine side-effects, she recommends not drastically changing your exercise routine on the day of your shot. But if you typically go for a run or do yoga, go for it.

She says it may help to do some light arm exercises close to the time of injection – for example a few sets of wall push-ups, shoulder presses and bicep curls. “Then you might want to consider having a rest day the day after the vaccination because reactions are sometimes being seen 24-48 hours after.”

And while you wait for the rollout to reach you, it’s worth ensuring you have a training routine in place. Australia’s physical activity guidelines for adults aged 18-64 are to have at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week, and two resistance training sessions – the latter of which Edwards particularly recommends for promoting immune function.

The bottom line, though, is working out is good for everybody, for myriad reasons. “If you’re particularly worried about a vaccine working well, then exercise is a really good thing to do, but remember it’s important for chronic disease, mental health, socialisation, all sorts of things,” Edwards says.

Newton says people shouldn’t worry that vigorous exercise will stress their bodies. “Unless you’re an elite athlete it’s very difficult to exercise to excess and compromise your immune system.” He recommends older Australians or people with chronic illness set up an exercise program with the guidance of an accredited exercise physiologist.

Sophie Aubrey

 

By: Sophie Aubrey

Source: How the COVID vaccine and regular exercise may increase effectiveness

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Related Links:

Common Ground: a pandemic influenza simulation exercise for the European Union, 23-24 November 2005

R Kaiser, M Ciotti, G Thinus… – Weekly releases (1997 …, 2005 – eurosurveillance.org
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More exercises at European and national levels will help to apply lessons learned … communication
mechanisms to aid preparations for an emergency such as an influenza pandemic …

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AJ Pinto, DW Dunstan, N Owen, E Bonfá… – Nature Reviews …, 2020 – nature.com
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for patients with rheumatic diseases without causing any important adverse events 2,3 …

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sleep hygiene, low-intensity physical activity (including pelvic exercises, yoga), dietary …

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RC Helmich, BR Bloem – Journal of Parkinson’s disease, 2020 – ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
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reduced physical exercise may contribute to increased psychological stress, thereby further …
Promoting home-based and adequately dosed exercises, such as cycling on a stationary …

Loneliness and social isolation in older adults during the Covid-19 pandemic: Implications for gerontological social work

M Berg-Weger, JE Morley – 2020 – Springer
… Having had to quickly respond during the pandemic necessitated the use of technology … delivery
option, traditional interventions can similarly be offered (eg, exercise, dementia care … eg, interactive
photo sharing, support and learning assistants, online-based websites for pairing …

General practice and pandemic influenza: a framework for planning and comparison of plans in five countries

MS Patel, CB Phillips, C Pearce, M Kljakovic… – PloS one, 2008 – journals.plos.org
… Tools [54], [55] and desktop simulation exercises [19] are available to help GPs plan … This aspect
of preparedness was enhanced after the Exercise Winter Willow simulation in … or impede effective
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Pandemic influenza preparedness and health systems challenges in Asia: results from rapid analyses in 6 Asian countries

P Hanvoravongchai, W Adisasmito… – BMC public …, 2010 – bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com
… Open Access; Published: 08 June 2010. Pandemic influenza preparedness and health
systems challenges in Asia: results from rapid analyses in 6 Asian countries … PDR in
2006. Pandemic preparedness programme. All countries in …

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Table 1), to ensure that patients keep themselves healthy during the pandemic and do … With
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… opportunities for the inclusion of all stakeholders in decision making, mock community‐wide
exercises and drills … communications, Assess readiness to meet communications needs in
preparation for an influenza pandemic, including regular review, exercise, and update …

The Strange Story Of Remdesivir, A Covid Drug That Doesn’t Work

Remdesivir in a syringe.

While clinical trials suggest remdesivir isn’t very effective in treating Covid-19, recent studies have shown that it does block Coronavirus activity. That apparent contradiction makes the antiviral drug even more controversial.

Remdesivir is an experimental drug developed by biotech company Gilead Sciences (under the brand name Veklury) in collaboration with the US Centers for Disease Control and Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases.

It’s one of many drug candidates that were originally designed in response to the threat from emerging diseases caused by RNA viruses — germs like the one behind the 2002 SARS outbreak — that have potential to cause global pandemics.

Such ‘broad-spectrum’ drugs target features shared by a wide range of disease-causing germs. In remdesivir’s case, that’s the virus’ genetic material, RNA. The drug proved ineffective against the Ebola virus, however, yet was still subsequently repurposed for SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus.

Remdesivir is not effective for Covid

News media prematurely reported that patients were responding to treatment. But the published data lated showed that “remdesivir was not associated with statistically significant clinical benefits [and] the numerical reduction in time to clinical improvement in those treated earlier requires confirmation in larger studies.”

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As our special series On the Front Lines continues, NBC’s Joe Fryer profiles one of the country’s first COVID-19 patients, Raymond Sismaet, who spent nearly a month in a hospital before recovering. His story spotlights the antiviral drug remdesivir as a possible coronavirus treatment. » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day.
If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY’s Website: http://on.today.com/ReadTODAY Find TODAY on Facebook: http://on.today.com/LikeTODAY Follow TODAY on Twitter: http://on.today.com/FollowTODAY Follow TODAY on Instagram: http://on.today.com/InstaTODAY Follow TODAY on Pinterest: http://on.today.com/PinTODAY #Coronavirus #Remdesivir #TodayShow

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The controversy surrounding remdesivir therefore revolves around whether the drug is actually an effective treatment. Early studies produced conflicting evidence on remdesivir’s effectiveness. Some found that Covid patients who received the drug recovered faster and fewer people died, but other studies showed that it didn’t reduce the length of hospitalization or death rate.

What’s weird about remdesivir is that it hasn’t been held to the same standards as other drug candidates. Covid-19 vaccines have been developed 10 times faster than traditional drugs, but they’ve passed the phase-3 clinical trials that test whether a potential medicine is both safe and effective in thousands of people.

Normally, a drug is only approved for use by a regulatory body like the US Food and Drug Administration if it meets the two criteria for safety and efficacy. Nonetheless, in October 2020, remdesivir was granted approval by FDA based on promising data from relatively small trials with about 1000 participants.

A large-scale analysis by the World Health Organization’s Solidarity trial consortium has cleared-up the confusion. Based on interim results from studying more than 5000 participants, the international study concluded that remdesivir “had little or no effect on hospitalized patients with Covid-19, as indicated by overall mortality, initiation of ventilation, and duration of hospital stay.”

As a consequence of being mostly ineffective, WHO recommends against the use of remdesivir in Covid-19 patients.

Remdesivir is an expensive drug

The drug is administered over 5 or 10 days. A five-day course of treatment costs around $2600 per person. So for a hospital with hundreds of Covid patients, that would amount to millions of dollars for one antiviral.

That price could be cost-effective if remdesivir saved lives and its use was limited to moderate or severe disease, but it’s also being made available for milder cases and WHO found that it isn’t a lifesaving drug.

What next for remdesivir? Following WHO’s finding, an article in the British Medical Journal highlighted another antiviral as a cautionary tale: oseltamivir or ‘Tamiflu’ — a drug that aims to block the influenza virus.

During the early 2000s, governments started stockpiling Tamiflu, paying billions to its manufacturer, pharmaceutical firm Roche. Then in 2013, independent researchers gained access to Roche’s unpublished data, revealing that the drug caused many side effects and only shortened the duration of flu symptoms by a few hours.

Tamiflu only cost $75 per treatment and yet was still a massive waste of money. The BMJ article implies that the story of remdesivir is another scandal waiting to happen.

Given that remdesivir is expensive and doesn’t seem to save lives, does it have any value? Maybe — but not as a medicine itself. Recent research suggests scientists should at least keep studying how it works in order to develop better drugs.

Remdesivir does block Coronavirus

Remdesivir doesn’t prevent people from being infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Whereas a vaccine is designed prompt your immune system to recognize the spike protein that allows Coronavirus to invade cells — and protect people from infection — antivirals such as remdesivir aim to disrupt the virus’ ability to replicate, to slow its spread and give your body extra time to develop immunity.

Coronaviruses use RNA for their genetic material — not the DNA used by cells — which means that they need a special molecular machine to copy their genes when producing new virus particles. That machine, ‘RNA polymerase’, is what’s targeted by remdesivir.

Two studies have now revealed how remdesivir blocks SARS-CoV-2 at the molecular level.

First, chemical engineers at the University of Chicago found that remdesivir is better at reducing virus replication than two similar antivirals, ribavirin and favilavir. Their computer models suggest that remdesivir beats the other drugs because it’s the best at binding and destabilizing the RNA polymerase.

In the second new study, researchers at the University of Texas at Austin used ‘cryogenic-electron microscopy’ (cryo-EM) to take snapshots of the structure of the molecules involved in replication as they would interact in a Covid patient.

After adding remdesivir to RNA polymerase, cryo-EM images showed that the drug acts like a blockage in a photocopier, getting stuck in the RNA polymerase. When four molecules of remdesivir get between the gears of the polymerase machine, its copies of RNA ‘paper’ can no longer pass through, stalling the virus-copying process.

That leads us to why it’s worth studying remdesivir. As structural biologist David Taylor explains, “We were able to identify the point where that paper jam happens […] If we want to make the blockage even worse, we could do so.”

One of remdesivir’s flaws is its (possibly toxic) high dosage over a short timeframe, which contributes to adverse side effects. By tweaking the drug molecule’s structure, scientists may be able to make it block the RNA polymerase machine with fewer molecules, which would then allow the drug to be delivered in a smaller dose.

In fact, Gilead Sciences has already isolated a compound similar to remdesivir, GS-441524, which costs less and is easier to manufacture. It’s also simpler to administer: while remdesivir must be injected, GS-441524 could be ingested in pill form. More of the molecule reaches the lungs — the main site of infection — too, which led researchers to state that “GS-441524 is superior to remdesivir for Covid-19 treatment.”

As SARS-CoV-2’s genetic material mutates to create new strains of the virus — and variants of Covid-19 — we may need antivirals to buy us time if those new strains end-up evading our current vaccines.

So despite being expensive and ineffective at treating Covid, remdesivir’s true value could be to help researchers create more effective medicines.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website or some of my other work here.

I’m a science communicator specialising in public engagement and outreach through entertainment, focusing on popular culture. I have a PhD in evolutionary biology and spent several years at BBC Science Focus magazine, running the features section and writing about everything from gay genes and internet memes to the science of death and origin of life. I’ve also contributed to Scientific American and Men’s Health. My latest book is ’50 Biology Ideas You Really Need to Know’

Source: The Strange Story Of Remdesivir, A Covid Drug That Doesn’t Work

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India bans exports of Remdesivir drug as new COVID-19 cases hit another record
thefinancialexpress.com.bd – Today
India on Sunday banned the export of anti-viral drug Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients as demand rocketed due to a record surge in COVID-1 […] In addition to the Remdesivir ban “till the situation improves”, the health ministry said in a statement that manufacturers ha […] media posts on Sunday showed large queues of people in the western state of Gujarat waiting to buy Remdesivir injections for COVID-19 patients. “Every day the central government is providing 50,000 Remdesivir injections but all of them are getting consumed,” Rajesh Tope, health minister of India’ […]
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Centre bans exports of anti-viral drug Remdesivir
[…] The Centre on Sunday prohibited exports of injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the Covid-19 situation in the country improves […] In light of the above, Government of India has prohibited the exports of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the situation improves,” the statement said […] The government has taken the following steps to ensure easy access of hospital and patients to Remdesivir: 1. All domestic manufactures of Remdesivir have been advised to display on their website, details of their stockists/distributors t […]
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SPL7013 COVID-19 nasal spray virucidal against SARS-CoV-2
starpharma.com – Today
[…] very favourably with the selectivity index against SARS-CoV-2 reported in the literature of 279 for remdesivir and 55 for hydroxychloroquine […]
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India bans Remdesivir exports as coronavirus rages on; rallies continue | MarketScreener
[…] sixth record rise in seven days, harried relatives of patients made a kilometre-long queue to buy Remdesivir outside a big hospital in the western state of Gujarat, witnesses said […] In addition to the Remdesivir ban “till the situation improves”, the health ministry said that manufacturers had been asked t […] The World Health Organization in November issued a conditional recommendation against the use of Remdesivir in hospitalised patients, saying there was no evidence that the drug improved survival and othe […]
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India bans Remdesivir exports as coronavirus rages on; rallies continue | Health
India on Sunday banned the export of anti-viral drug Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients as demand rocketed due to a record surge in COVID-1 […] sixth record rise in seven days, harried relatives of patients made a kilometre-long queue to buy Remdesivir outside a big hospital in the western state of Gujarat, witnesses said […] In addition to the Remdesivir ban “till the situation improves”, the health ministry said that manufacturers had been asked t […] The World Health Organization in November issued a conditional recommendation against the use of Remdesivir in hospitalised patients, saying there was no evidence that the drug improved survival and othe […]
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Maharashtra: Decision on Covid lockdown after 14 April, says health minister Tope
The Maharashtra CM discussed several issues including availability of beds, use of Remdesivir and imposition of restrictions in today’s meeting The worst-hit Covid-19 state has administered over 1 crore vaccine doses state so far
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India bans export of anti-viral drug Remdesivir amid surge in Covid cases
inquest.org.in – Today
[…] In the order, the government said it has banned the export of Remdesivir injection and Remdesivir active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) till the pandemic situation in the country stabilises […] To ensure more people can get Remdesivir, the government said manufacturers of Remdesivir have been asked to show on their website the details of their stockists and distributors […] of Pharmaceuticals has been in contact with the domestic manufacturers to ramp up the production of Remdesivir,” the government said. The National Clinical Management Protocol for COVID-19 lists Remdesivir as an investigational therapy, where informed and shared decision making is essential […]
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India bans exports of antiviral drug Remdesivir as COVID-19 cases surge
NEW DELHI: India on Sunday (Apr 11) banned the export of antiviral drug Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients as demand rocketed due to a record surge in COVID-1 […] In addition to the Remdesivir ban “till the situation improves”, the health ministry said in a statement that manufacturers ha […] media posts on Sunday showed large queues of people in the western state of Gujarat waiting to buy Remdesivir injections for COVID-19 patients. “Every day the central government is providing 50,000 Remdesivir injections but all of them are getting consumed,” Rajesh Tope, health minister of India’ […]
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Coronavirus Lockdown India News Live Updates: Covid-19 Cases, Lockdown, Night Curfew Guidelines in Delhi, UP, Maharashtra, MP Today Latest News
indianexpress.com – Today
[…] As Covid-19 cases continued to surge, Centre on Sunday banned the export of anti-viral drug remdesivir in view of increased demand, news agency PTI reported […] easy access of the drug, which is used in treatment of coronavirus, all domestic manufacturers of remdesivir have been requested to display details of their stockists and distributors on their website, th […] 13:52 (IST) 11 APR 2021 Two including nurse arrested for illegal Remdesivir sale The Crime Branch of Pune City police has arrested two persons, including a nurse from […]
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Covid-appropriate behaviour not being followed in three states: Govt | Business Standard News
[…] Shortage of Remdesivir and low molecular weight Heparin needs urgent attention in Korba, the ministry said […]
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Govt bans export of Remdesivir: Know all about the drug
[…] What is Remdesivir? Remdesivir is an investigational antiviral drug to fight Sars-cov 2, the virus that causes Covid-19 […] How did Remdesivir come into use? FDA had to issue an emergency use authorisation of Remdesivir to give doctors access to the medication outside of an investigational (clinical trial) setting […]
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COVID appropriate behaviour not being followed in 50 most-affected districts in 3 states: Govt | Health
[…] Shortage of Remdesivir and low molecular weight Heparin needs urgent attention in Korba, the ministry said […]
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Govt prohibits exports of remdesivir till COVID situation improves in India | India News,
indianexpress.com – Today
In view of increased demand for remdesivir due to a surge in COVID-19 cases, the Centre on Sunday said the export of the antiviral injectio […] which is used in treatment of coronavirus, to hospitals and patients, all domestic manufacturers of remdesivir have been advised to display on their website details of their stockists and distributors, th […] This has led to a sudden spike in demand for remdesivir injection used in treatment of COVID patients,” the ministry said […] “In light of the above, Government of India has prohibited the exports of remdesivir injection and remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the situation improves,” it said […]
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Mathura’s Banke Bihari temple issues new guidelines amid surge in COVID-19 cases | India News • eeKPe News
news.eekpe.com – Today
[…] As India experiences a second wave of novel coronavirus infections, the demand for anti-viral drug Remdesivir has surged too. The Centre on… Read more India Bans Export Of Anti-Viral Drug Remdesivir Amid Surge In… INDIA eekpe – April 11, 2021 0 <!– –>7 Indian corporations are producing Remdesivir beneath voluntary licensing settlement with Gilead Sciences (File)New Delhi: India has banne […]
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Doctors continue debate over ivermectin for COVID-19
[…] that only 16 deaths have been reported involving ivermectin, compared to much higher totals for remdesivir, which is used to treat COVID-19 symptoms, as well as COVID-19 vaccines […]
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Can natural antioxidants help fight new GI symptoms in Covid patients?
yespunjab.com – Today
[…] (Agency) Covid Spike: India Prohibits Export Of Remdesivir – Advertisement – ShareFacebook Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Linkedin Telegram Yes Punjab – TO […]
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Covid spike: India prohibits export of remdesivir
[…] trend, the Ministry said: “There is a potential of further increase in demand of injection remdesivir and remdesivir active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in the coming days […] of the above increasing Covid cases, Government of India has prohibited the exports of injection remdesivir and remdesivir active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) till the situation improves […] ” Govt of India prohibited exports of injection remdesivir and active pharmaceutical ingredients Seven Indian companies are producing injection remdesivir under voluntary licensing agreement with Gilead Sciences, US […]
0
India bans exports of anti-viral drug Remdesivir as Covid-19 cases surge
kathmandupost.com – Today
India said on Sunday it had banned the export of anti-viral drug Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients after a record spike in Covid-19 cases sent deman […] “In light of the above, Government of India has prohibited the exports of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the situation improves,” the health ministry said in a […]
0
India bans exports of Remdesivir drug as new Covid-19 cases hit another record, South Asia News & Top Stories
NEW DELHI (REUTERS) – India on Sunday (April 11) banned the export of anti-viral drug Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients as demand rocketed due to a record surge in Covid-1 […] media posts on Sunday showed large queues of people in the western state of Gujarat waiting to buy Remdesivir injections for Covid-19 patients. “Every day the central government is providing 50,000 Remdesivir injections but all of them are getting consumed,”Mr Rajesh Tope, health minister of India’ […]
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India bans exports of Remdesivir drug as new Covid-19 cases hit another record
NEW DELHI (REUTERS) – India on Sunday (April 11) banned the export of anti-viral drug Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients as demand rocketed due to a record surge in Covid-1 […] media posts on Sunday showed large queues of people in the western state of Gujarat waiting to buy Remdesivir injections for Covid-19 patients. “Every day the central government is providing 50,000 Remdesivir injections but all of them are getting consumed,”Mr Rajesh Tope, health minister of India’ […]
1
Centre prohibits export of Injection Remdesivir in view of surge in COVID cases
[…] This has led to a sudden spike in demand for Injection Remdesivir used in the treatment of COVID patients […] In light of the above, the Government of India has prohibited the export of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the situation improves […] Government of India has taken the following steps to ensure easy access of hospital and patients to Remdesivir: All domestic manufactures of Remdesivir have been advised to display on their website, details of their stockists/distributors t […]
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Vaccine universalisation, vaccine nationalism need of the hour: AAP leader Chadha writes to PM | Politics
[…] for all and taking steps like prohibiting COVID medicine export as it has today banned export of remdesivir injections,” he said […]
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India bans export of Remdesivir amid rising Covid-19 cases
newsvibesofindia.com – Today
New Delhi (NVI): India has prohibited exports of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the COVID-19 situation improves, as the countr […] It said that there is a potential of further increase in the demand of Injection Remdesivir in the coming days. At present, seven Indian companies are producing Injection Remdesivir under voluntary licensing agreement with M/s […] In light of the above, India has prohibited the exports of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the situation improves, the Ministry said […]
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Maharashtra: Thane Covid centre patients shifted over oxygen concerns | Business Standard News
[…] as officer in charge to coordinate the purchase, storage and distribution of medical oxygen gas and Remdesivir injections, a release by civic spokesperson Sandeep Malavali said […]
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India bans exports of Remdesivir drug as new COVID-19 cases hit another record | MarketScreener
[…] In addition to the Remdesivir ban “till the situation improves”, the health ministry said in a statement that manufacturers ha […] media posts on Sunday showed large queues of people in the western state of Gujarat waiting to buy Remdesivir injections for COVID-19 patients. “Every day the central government is providing 50,000 Remdesivir injections but all of them are getting consumed,” Rajesh Tope, health minister of India’ […]
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Maha: Thane COVID centre patients shifted over oxygen concerns | Health
[…] as officer in charge to coordinate the purchase, storage and distribution of medical oxygen gas and Remdesivir injections, a release by civic spokesperson Sandeep Malavali said […]
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India Bans Exports of Antiviral Drug Remdesivir as COVID-19 Cases Surge
science.thewire.in – Today
Seven Indian companies have licensed the drug from Gilead Sciences, with an installed capacity of about 3.9 million units per month.
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India bans exports of Remdesivir drug as new COVID-19 cases hit another record | Health
India on Sunday banned the export of anti-viral drug Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients as demand rocketed due to a record surge in COVID-1 […] In addition to the Remdesivir ban “till the situation improves”, the health ministry said in a statement that manufacturers ha […] media posts on Sunday showed large queues of people in the western state of Gujarat waiting to buy Remdesivir injections for COVID-19 patients. “Every day the central government is providing 50,000 Remdesivir injections but all of them are getting consumed,” Rajesh Tope, health minister of India’ […]
0
Amidst sharp rise in COVID-19 cases, India bans export of Remdesivir; its active pharmaceutical ingredients
asianews.press – Today
[…] As a result, it has led to a sudden spike in demand for Injection Remdesivir used in the treatment of COVID patients and the potential for a further increase in this demand i […] The Government of India has prohibited the exports of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) “till the situation improves in the country […] India govt has taken the following steps to ensure easy access of hospital and patients to Remdesivir: All domestic manufactures of Remdesivir have been advised to display on their website, details of their stockists/distributors t […]
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No export of Remdesivir till COVID situation improves in India: Govt
New Delhi: In view of increased demand for Remdesivir due to a surge in COVID-19 cases, the Centre on Sunday said the export of the antiviral injectio […] which is used in treatment of coronavirus, to hospitals and patients, all domestic manufacturers of Remdesivir have been advised to display on their website details of their stockists and distributors, th […] This has led to a sudden spike in demand for Remdesivir injection used in treatment of COVID patients,” the ministry said […] “In light of the above, Government of India has prohibited the exports of remdesivir injection and remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the situation improves,” it said […]
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India halts export of key Covid drug Remdesivir as cases rise across country
theprint.in – Today
Text Size: A- A+ New Delhi: The Centre on Sunday prohibited exports of injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the Covid-19 situation in the country improves. Remdesivir is considered a key anti-viral drug in the fight against Covid-19 […] addition, the government has taken three steps to ensure easy access of hospitals and patients to Remdesivir. All domestic manufactures of Remdesivir have been advised to display on their website, details of their stockists/distributors t […]
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Enterprise Information | Inventory and Share Market Information – Information by Automobilnews.eu
automobilnews.eu – Today
“Export of injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Energetic Pharmaceutical Components (API) prohibited until the COVID-19 state of affairs within the […]
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As coronavirus cases spike, Indore’s health infrastructure gets stretched | Business Standard News
[…] uploading videos and messages on social media about shortage of beds and key medicines like Remdesivir […] He said Remdesivir consignments were coming in at present and their distribution was taking place as per guidelines […] “Doctors have been told to give Remdesivir injections only to those who absolutely need it,” Satya said […]
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India bans exports of anti-viral drug Remdesivir as COVID-19 cases surge
India on Sunday banned the export of anti-viral drug Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients as demand rocketed due to a record surge in COVID-1 […] sixth record rise in seven days, harried relatives of patients made a kilometre-long queue to buy Remdesivir outside a big hospital in the western state of Gujarat, witnesses said […] In addition to the Remdesivir ban “till the situation improves,” the health ministry said that manufacturers had been asked t […] The World Health Organization in November issued a conditional recommendation against the use of Remdesivir in hospitalized patients, saying there was no evidence that the drug improved survival and othe […]
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Covid-19: India bans export of Remdesivir injection, API
India today prohibited the export of Remdesivir injection, which is used to treat Covid patients, and also Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API), amidst a surge in coronavirus cases in the country […] “This has led to a sudden spike in the demand for injection Remdesivir used in treatment of Covid patients […] Seven Indian companies are producing the Remdesivir injection under voluntary licensing agreement with M/S Gilead Sciences of the USA […]
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Maharashtra likely to announce 15-day lockdown after weekend curbs, marginal drop in Covid-19 cases after night curfew
[…] Other suggestions by Fadnavis like the early report of tests, availability of Remdesivir and oxygen for treatment will also be considered […]
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“For God’s Sake, Get Vaccine, Drugs”: Top Mumbai Doctor’s Desperate Appeal
[…] The hospital was not only short of vaccines but also life-saving drugs like Remdesivir, said Dr Jalil Parkar, a pulmonary consultant with the hospital […] There is a shortage of Remdesivir, there is shortage of Tosilizubam […] “My earnest request for god’s sake please see to it that Remdesivir, Tosilizubam, vaccination — they are available […]
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COVID-19: Centre bans exports of anti-viral drug Remdesivir till situation in India improves
COVID-19: Centre bans exports of anti-viral drug Remdesivir till situation in India improves India’s sudden spike in COVID-19 cases has led to an increase i […] Zee Media Updated: Apr 11, 2021, 06:29 PM IST The Centre on Sunday prohibited exports of injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the Covid-19 situation in the country improves […] data on deaths In light of the above, Government of India has prohibited the exports of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the situation improves,” the statement said […]
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8k Remdesivir vials have arrived: Madhya Pradesh official as cases surge
[…] (Representational image: IE) Amid a surge in coronavirus cases and a clamour for Remdesivir, a drug considered useful in the treatment of the infection, a senior Madhya Pradesh official o […]
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India bans Remdesivir exports till COVID surge abates
Seven Indian companies producing Remdesivir injections under voluntary licensing agreement with US-based Gilead Sciences have an installed capacity of about 38.80 lakh units per month
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Government Halts Export Of Remdesivir Till COVID-19 Situation Improves
[…] The Government of India said: “Export of injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) prohibited till the COVID-19 situation in the countr […] of Pharmaceuticals has been in contact with the domestic manufacturers to ramp up the production of Remdesivir in India. Notably, there are seven Indian companies that are currently producing injection Remdesivir under voluntary licensing agreement with M/s Gilead Sciences, USA […]
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Export of anti-viral drug remdesivir prohibited in view of increased demand due to surge in COVID-19 cases: Centre. | Newsalert
Export of anti-viral drug remdesivir prohibited in view of increased demand due to surge in COVID-19 cases: Centre. PTI | New Delhi | Updated: 11-04-2021 18:11 IST | Created: 11-04-2021 18:11 IST Export of anti-viral drug remdesivir prohibited in view of increased demand due to surge in COVID-19 cases: Centre. (This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.) POST / READ COMMENTS Country India Share
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Clinical Research Forum Presents Moderna and Pfizer with Award for Extraordinary Impact on Health | NEWS-Line for Healthcare Professionals
[…] Hospital; Margaret Lippincott, MD, Instructor in Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital · Remdesivir in COVID 19 – John Beigel, MD, Associate Director for Clinical Research, National Institute o […]
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Centre bans export of Remdesivir amid crunch, eases access of Covid patients to anti-viral drug – Coronavirus Outbreak News
[…] being used in the treatment of Covid-19 patients, the Centre has prohibited the export of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) […] In a press note on Sunday, the Centre prohibited exports of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API). A number of companies in India produce Injection Remdesivir under a voluntary licensing agreement with US pharma giant Gilead Sciences […]
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For God’s Sake, Get Vaccine, Drugs: Top Mumbai Doctor’s Desperate Appeal
[…] The hospital was not only short of vaccines but also life-saving drugs like Remdesivir, said Dr Jalil Parkar, a pulmonary consultant with the hospital […] There is a shortage of Remdesivir, there is shortage of Tosilizubam […] “My earnest request for god’s sake please see to it that Remdesivir, Tosilizubam, vaccination — they are available […]
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Government bans export of Remdesivir till Covid-19 situation improves
economictimes.indiatimes.com – Today
[…] In an order, the government said it has banned export of Remdesivir injection and Remdesivir active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) till the pandemic situation in the country stabilises […] the government has also taken a few steps to ensure easy access of hospital and patients to Remdesivir. These steps are: – All domestic manufactures of Remdesivir have been advised to display on their website, details of their stockists/distributors t […]
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COVID-19: India bans export of Remdesivir drug, injection as coronavirus cases surge | India News
zeenews.india.com – Today
CORONAVIRUS COVID-19: India bans export of Remdesivir drug, injection as coronavirus cases surge The Centre banned the export of Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients as the demand for anti-viral drug Remdesivir has surged […] As India experiences a second wave of novel coronavirus infections, the demand for anti-viral drug Remdesivir has surged too. The Centre on Sunday (April 11, 2021) banned the export of Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients […]
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India bans export of Remdesivir, its ingredients till COVID situation improves | Coronavirus News | Inshorts
inshorts.com – Today
india has banned the export of injection remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients api till the coronavirus situation in the country improves the centre said on sunday theres potential for further increase in demand for remdesivir in the coming days the government said adding that the …
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Centre Bans Export of Remdesivir and Its Active Ingredients till Covid Crisis Eases in India
The Centre on Sunday prohibited the export of Remdesivir injection and its active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) till the pandemic situation arising ou […] The decision has been taken to ensure easy access of Remdesivir to infected patients and hospitals providing treating against the virus […] Several hospitals have complained of shortage of Remdesivir, considered a key anti-viral drug in the fight against COVID-19, especially in adult patients wit […] other steps to bring the situation under control, including advising all domestic manufactures of Remdesivir to display on their website, details of their stockists and distributors to facilitate access t […]
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India bans export of Remdesivir injection amid surge in Covid cases | India News – Times of India
NEW DELHI: India on Sunday banned the export of Remdesivir injection till the Covid-19 situation improves in the country […] The government in a statement said that all domestic manufactures of Remdesivir have been advised to display on their website, details of their stockists/distributors t […] of Pharmaceuticals has been in contact with the domestic manufacturers to ramp up the production of Remdesivir […] The alarming spike in Covid cases in the country has led to a sudden increase in demand for the Remdesivir injection used in treating Covid patients […]
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India bans exports of anti-viral drug Remdesivir as COVID-19 cases surge
NEW DELHI: India said on Sunday it had banned the export of anti-viral drug Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients after a record spike in COVID-19 cases sent deman […] “In light of the above, Government of India has prohibited the exports of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the situation improves,” the health ministry said in a […]
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India bans exports of anti-viral drug Remdesivir as COVID-19 cases surge | Reuters
[…] 1 MIN READ NEW DELHI (Reuters) – India said on Sunday it had banned the export of anti-viral drug Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients after a record spike in COVID-19 cases sent deman […] “In light of the above, Government of India has prohibited the exports of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the situation improves,” the health ministry said in a […]
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India bans export of Remdesivir injection amid surge in Covid cases | India News – Times of India
timesofindia.indiatimes.com – Today
India News: NEW DELHI: India on Sunday banned the export of Remdesivir injection till the Covid-19 situation improves in the country.
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No lockdown in Madhya Pradesh, only ‘corona curfew’, says CM | Business Standard News
[…] We have received 4,000 injections of Remdesivir (the key anti-viral drug) and would be getting 5,000 more today […]
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Coronavirus: Centre bans export of antiviral drug Remdesivir amid surge in cases
scroll.in – Today
The Centre on Sunday banned the export of antiviral drug Remdesivir indefinitely, in view of the rising coronavirus cases in the country, ANI reported […] The government said the ban, which covers Remdesivir injections and Remdesivir active pharmaceutical ingredients, will be lifted only after there is an improvement in th […] Remdesivir is considered a key drug in combating Covid-19, especially in adult patients with sever […]
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Gilead Sciences : India bans exports of anti-viral drug Remdesivir as COVID-19 cases surge | MarketScreener
“In light of the above, Government of India has prohibited the exports of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the situation improves,” the health ministry said in a statement. Seven Indian companies have licensed the drug from Gilead Sciences, with an installed capacity of about 3.9 million units per month. (Reporting by Krishna N. Das and Devjyot Ghoshal; Editing by Susan Fenton)
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Centre Prohibits Export of Remdesivir till COVID-19 Situation in Country Improves
Centre Prohibits Export of Remdesivir till COVID-19 Situation in Country Improves…
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India bans exports of anti-viral drug Remdesivir as COVID-19 cases surge
mumbaimirror.indiatimes.com – Today
India bans exports of anti-viral drug Remdesivir as COVID-19 cases surge Reuters / Updated: Apr 11, 2021, 17:50 IST Representational Image […] Photo: BCCL New Delhi: India said on Sunday it had banned the export of anti-viral drug Remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients after a record spike in COVID-19 cases sent deman […] “In light of the above, Government of India has prohibited the exports of Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the situation improves,” the health ministry said in a […]
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Centre prohibits export of Remdesivir & its API till COVID-19 situation improves in India
With several states complaining of shortage of Remdesivir injections – which is used in COVID-19 treatment, the Centre on Sunday, has banned the export of Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the COVID-19 situation in the country improves […] READ | Remdesivir shortage in Nagpur; Union Minister Nitin Gadkari dials Sun Pharma chief Govt bans export of Remdesivir Additionally, Centre has taken the following steps to streamline Remdesivir supply: All domestic manufactures of Remdesivir have been advised to display on their website […]
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Govt suspends export of Remdesivir till coronavirus situation improves | Business Standard News
The union government on Sunday suspended the export of Remdesivir injections and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) till the coronavirus situation improves in the country […] “The current situation has led to a sudden spike in demand for Remdesivir injection used in treatment of Covid patients […] In addition, the government has taken the steps to ensure easy access of hospital and patients to Remdesivir All domestic manufactures of Remdesivir have been advised to display on their website, details of their stock lists or distributors t […]
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India bans export of Remdesivir drug, injection till Covid situation improves
“Export of injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) prohibited till the COVID-19 situation in the countr […] This has led to a sudden spike in demand for Injection Remdesivir used in treatment of COVID patients. There is a potential of a further increase in demand for Remdesivir injection in the coming days,” the Centre said in a statement […] of Pharmaceuticals has been in contact with domestic manufacturers to ramp up the production of Remdesivir, it further stated. In its fresh order, it said that all domestic manufactures of Remdesivir advised to display on their website, details of their stockists/distributors to facilitate acces […]
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No lockdown in MP, only ‘corona curfew’: Chouhan | Health
[…] We have received 4,000 injections of Remdesivir (the key anti-viral drug) and would be getting 5,000 more today […]
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India Bans Export Of Anti-Viral Drug Remdesivir Amid Surge In Covid Cases
[…] In an order, the government said it has banned export of Remdesivir injection and Remdesivir active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) till the pandemic situation in the country stabilises […] To ensure more people can get Remdesivir, the government said manufactures of Remdesivir have been asked to show on their website the details of their stockists and distributors […] of Pharmaceuticals has been in contact with the domestic manufacturers to ramp up the production of Remdesivir,” the government said. The National Clinical Management Protocol for COVID-19 lists Remdesivir as an investigational therapy, where informed and shared decision making is essential […]
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Remdesivir injections and Favipiravir tablets vanish from UP’s Prayagraj medicine shops | Allahabad News
dlsnewsindia.com – Today
PRAYAGRAJ: The Remdesivir injection and Favipiravir tablets seem to have vanished from the city-based medicine market wit […] at Leader road dealing wholesale medicine market claimed that there was an acute shortage of Remdesivir injection and Favipiravir tablets […] UP Chemist & Druggist Federation admitted to TOI that there has been an acute shortage of Remdesivir injection and Favipiravir tablets in markets and we have been demanding from concerne […] “ I have made calls to my relatives to arrange Remdesivir injection after seeing its acute crisis in city” said Ashutosh who arrived Leader road medicin […]
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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS FROM WESTERN REGION AT 5 pm. | Law-Order
[…] BOM2 MH-REMDESIVIR-CONTROL ROOMS Maha to set up control rooms for smooth supply of Remdesivir Mumbai: The Maharashtra government has decided to set up district-level control rooms to ensur […] government has decided to set up district-level control rooms to ensure smooth supply of Remdesivir injections and prevent hoarding and black-marketing of the drug, officials said on Sunday […]
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Coronavirus update: Latest Covid-19 vaccine and world news
[…] India has banned the export of anti-viral drug remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients following a rise in coronavirus cases, a statement fro […] The ban would apply to Injection Remdesivir and Remdesivir Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) until the Covid-19 situation in the country improves, th […] ministry said, adding that this rise has led to a sudden spike in demand for the anti-viral drug remdesivir and its active pharmaceutical ingredients used in the treatment of coronavirus patients […]
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Business & Financial News, U.S & International Breaking News | Reuters
[…] Carnival-loving, eloquent Soeder wants to be Germany’s first Bavarian chancellor 2h ago India bans Remdesivir exports as coronavirus rages on; rallies continue 2h ago Pacific island devotees of Prince Phili […]
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AAP slams BJP’s ‘free Remdesivir distribution’ in Surat; Guj CM says ‘not from govt stock’
Last Updated: 11th April, 2021 16:37 IST AAP Slams BJP’s ‘free Remdesivir Distribution’ In Surat; Guj CM Says ‘not From Govt Stock’ Slamming BJP’s Gujarat unit over Remdesivir injection hoarding, AAP said that the BJP had taken PM Modi’s message of  “converting disasters o […] Currently, Gujarat’s neighbouring state Maharashtra too is facing an acute Remdesivir shortage. READ | Maharashtra to set up control rooms for smooth supply of Remdesivir amid COVID crisis “About Surat, C R Paatil has arranged for 5,000 Remdesivir injections […]
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FREE Coronavirus Awareness Training – Free E-Learning Course
[…] trials are looking at the potential use of two HIV drugs as well as another antiviral called Remdesivir that was developed to tackle haemorrhagic fevers including Ebola […]

COVID-19 Vaccination Passports Worry Public Health Experts

More and more people are getting vaccinated, and some are even traveling. Which has led to a debate over whether countries should require COVID-19 vaccination passports or IDs. The European Union is proposing a so-called Digital Green Pass so vaccinated people can move more freely.

Family vacation in Italy? Business trip to China? No problem. Just show me your COVID-19 vaccine certificate. This might be the future. “I think it would certainly speed up the recovery of those sectors that have been slowed down or shut down because of risk of exposure to COVID,” said Glenn Melnick, a health economist at the University of Southern California.

Many worry about creating an underclass of unvaccinated people who also can’t travel. Dr. Wafaa el-Sadr at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health said the U.S. still has a lot of work to do.

“I’m hopeful that if there’s a true commitment in this country to equity that we would be able to reach a point where we have been able to overcome the very real barriers that people are facing now in accessing vaccination,” she said.

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NBC News medical contributor Dr. Vin Gupta and CNBC’s senior health and science reporter Meg Tirrell join TODAY to discuss the latest news surrounding coronavirus vaccine candidates. They discuss the possibility of a vaccine passport required by businesses and events to ensure the safety of customers and employees. » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY
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And if it’s going to happen, Jennifer Nuzzo at Johns Hopkins University said, universal verification systems will be needed. “You are requiring countries to show proof of having provided something that is very hard to get, that can create incentives for perhaps not being completely transparent about what’s actually going on,” she said.

As other countries start to experiment with vaccine credentials, Americans who want to travel may have to participate.

Source: COVID-19 “vaccine passports” worry public health experts – Marketplace

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New Covid Strain: How Many Variants of Coronavirus Are There

The emergence of variants is linked to ongoing surges since infections give viruses the chance to mutate and spread.

Many variants of the coronavirus are circulating around the world, but scientists are primarily concerned about three. How many variants of the coronavirus are there?

There are many circulating around the world, but health experts are primarily concerned with the emergence of three. As a virus infects people, it can mutate as it makes copies of itself. Some mutations can be harmful to a virus, causing it to die out. Others can offer an advantage and help it spread.

“Not every mutation is created equal,” said Dr. Mary Petrone, who studies infectious diseases at Yale University. “The virus is going to get lucky now and again.”Monitoring variants is important because of the possibility that they could make vaccines and treatments less effective, or change the way they infect people.

A mutation early in the pandemic fueled the spread of the virus around the world, but there had been no notable changes since — until recently, said Ohio State University biologist Daniel Jones.

One of the three main variants experts are watching was discovered in the United Kingdom late last year and has been detected in dozens of countries since. Health officials initially said it didn’t seem to cause worse disease, but some newer information suggests it might — that remains unknown at the moment. It does appear to spread more easily, which could lead to more hospitalisations and deaths.

The variant might become dominant in the US by March, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Other variants first detected in South Africa and in Brazil also appear more contagious, experts say.

Data so far suggests current vaccines should still protect against these variants, though there’s some concern their effectiveness may be slightly diminished. There is some evidence that some antibody treatments may be less effective against certain variants.

There are ways to adjust vaccines and treatments to maintain their effectiveness, said Dr. Anthony Fauci, the top US infectious disease expert.The emergence of variants is linked to ongoing surges since infections give viruses the chance to mutate and spread. It’s another reason experts stress the importance of mask wearing and social distancing.

“The fewer humans carrying the virus, the fewer opportunities it has to mutate,” Jones said.The announcement that the coronavirus strain sweeping Britain could be more deadly as well as more transmissible has raised fresh concerns about the variant that has spread to dozens of countries.

Initially British experts said that their evidence suggested the new strain circulating in the UK — one of several to have emerged internationally in recent months — was between 50 per cent and 70 per cent more transmissible.On Friday, however, the government said the new variant could also be 30-40 percent more deadly, although it stressed the assessment relied on sparse data.

What has changed?

In mid-January, two separate studies by London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Imperial College London were presented to Britain’s New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG).They linked data from people who tested positive for the virus in the community — rather than in hospital — with death data and found a roughly 30 percent increase in the risk of death associated with the new strain.

The groups used slightly different methods, but both matched people with the new variant to those with the older variants, taking into account other variables like age and location and controlling for hospitals being under pressure.Other studies by Exeter University and Public Health England also found higher deaths and both came up with even higher figures.

Based on these analyses, NERVTAG said there was “a realistic possibility” that infection with the new variant is associated with an increased risk of death compared with previously circulating variants.The increase in transmissibility associated to the variant was already causing alarm, because the more people the virus infects the more people will suffer serious illness and the risk of death.

“Unfortunately, it looks as if this virus might be both” more infectious and potentially more deadly, John Edmunds, a professor in LSHTM’s Centre for the Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases, told a press briefing Monday”So it’s really a serious turn for the worse unfortunately,” he said.

How reliable are the findings?

Researchers said there were still uncertainties in the data and said the picture would become clearer in the next few weeks.Edmunds said the findings were “statistically significant”.But he said while the studies used information from those tested in the community, most people who die of Covid-19 go straight to hospital and are tested there.

Researchers do not yet have that hospital information.NERVTAG said this lag in data could be why the studies did not find evidence of an increase in hospitalisations of people with the new variant, which seems at odds with the findings of increased severity of disease.

It also said the mortality data used in the research only covers eight percent of the total deaths during the study period and said the results “may therefore not be representative of the total population”.

Why more deadly?

Researchers think it could be the same set of mutations that has made it more infectious — although all stress more study is needed.One mutation in particular increases the virus’ ability to latch on more strongly to human cells and NERVTAG head Peter Horby, an emerging infectious disease professor at Oxford University, said evidence suggests this means it could make it easier to become infected.

“If it’s then able to spread between cells much quicker within the lungs, that may increase the rate of disease and the rate of inflammation, which may then progress quicker than your body can respond to, so it could explain both characteristics of the virus,” he said.Bjorn Meyer, virologist at France’s Institut Pasteur, told AFP that the issue could be viral load.

“The virus might not have evolved to be more deadly as such, but it might have evolved to grow more or better, which could cause more damage in a patient overall,” he said.

Does this affect treatments?

Horby, who also leads the Recovery trial — which identified the steroid dexamethasone as effective for severely ill hospital patients — said there was “no evidence” that treatments would work less well. Anti inflammatories such as dexamethasone “should work equally as well because it’s not related to the virus, it is related to the host response”, he said.

Horby said overall improvements in therapies and treatments — including things like better strategies for hospital respiratory support — have brought down case fatality rates since the first wave and could even “offset any difference with this new variant”.

As for the vaccines, a preliminary study this month from Britain and the Netherlands found the variant would not be able to evade the protective effect of current vaccines. Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna have also released early research suggesting their vaccines would still be effective against the strain.

Don’t viruses weaken as they spread?

Scientists have sought to challenge the belief that the virus will become get less virulent as it evolves to become more infectious. The virus that causes Covid-19 is already “very good at its job of getting transmitted” said Emma Hocroft, an epidemiologist at the University of Bern.

“So I don’t think that we can make this assumption that it wants to be less severe. I don’t want to downplay that it is severe for many people, but for the majority of people, it’s not severe,” she told AFP. She said the ability to transmit before it kills was “a really low bar”, citing diseases like measles and HIV that have remained as dangerous.

Graham Medley, a professor of Infectious Disease Modelling at the LSHTM, told the Monday press briefing that despite uncertainties in the new studies on the new variant in the UK, they should dispel the idea that it would become less virulent. “It’s certainly not the case that this is a more benign virus,” he said.

By: https://www.khaleejtimes.com/

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Professor Shane Crotty, Ph.D. explains recent coronavirus mutations and how they might impact COVID 19 vaccines and transmission. COVID-19 research of Prof. Crotty and his team was published Jan. 6, 2021, in the prestigious Journal Science: https://science.sciencemag.org/conten… Prof. Shane Crotty is a Professor at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology, Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research, Crotty Lab. Prof. Crotty also has an academic appointment with the University of California San Diago. See his full bio here: https://www.lji.org/labs/crotty/#over… Prof. Crotty on Twitter: https://twitter.com/profshanecrotty Interviewer: Kyle Allred, Physician Assistant, Producer and Co-Founder of MedCram.com TOPICS DISCUSSED IN THIS VIDEO INCLUDE: 0:00 Intro 0:08 SARS-CoV-2 / COVID 19 mutations (UK variant etc.) and implications for COVID-19 vaccines 10:58 How to test if coronavirus variants can escape immunity 12:28 How have mutations made this virus more transmissible? 17:44 Could mutations make vaccines less than 50% effective? 24:15 Possible changes to vaccine schedules (one dose, half dose)? 35:34 Could alternate COVID-19 vaccine schedule make mutations more likely? 38:29 What is next for Prof. Crotty and his team? (This video was recorded on January 5, 2021) PREVIOUS DISCUSSION WITH PROF. CROTTY (Dec 16, 2020): https://youtu.be/eK0C5tFHze8 REFERENCES: Viral mutations may cause another ‘very, very bad’ COVID-19 wave, scientists warn (Science) | https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/… Vaccine Tracker (Bloomberg) | https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/co… FDA Statement on Following the Auth. Dosing Schedules for COVID-19 Vaccines | https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press… S-variant SARS-CoV-2 is assoc. with sig. higher viral loads in samples tested by ThermoFisher TaqPath RT-QPCR (MedRxiv) | https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.11… Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) System | https://www.merckmanuals.com/professi… UK reports new variant, termed VUI 202012/01 (GISAID) https://www.gisaid.org/references/gis… Covid-19 in South Africa: Scientists seek to understand new variant (BBC) | https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa… Mutation Allows Coronavirus to Infect More Cells. Scientists Urge Caution (NY Times) | https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/12/sc… The UK is delaying second vaccine shots and it’s proving controversial (CNBC) https://www.cnbc.com/2021/01/05/the-u… The receptor binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 (News Medical Life Sciences) | https://www.news-medical.net/news/202… NY Times article highlighting Prof. Shane Crotty’s research: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/17/he… THE MEDCRAM WEBSITE: Visit us for videos on over 60 medical topics and CME / CEs for medical professionals: https://www.medcram.com SUBSCRIBE TO THE MEDCRAM YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/user/MEDCRAMv… Get notified of new videos by hitting the bell icon! PREVIOUS / RECENT MEDCRAM COVID-19 INTERVIEWS: Vitamin D and COVID 19: The Evidence for Prevention and Treatment of Coronavirus (SARS CoV 2) with Professor Roger Seheult, MD https://youtu.be/ha2mLz-Xdpg At Home COVID 19 Antigen Testing and Vaccine Update with Professor Michael Mina, MD https://youtu.be/CjphzlV5DYo All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com ad-free (including more videos on RNA vaccines, BioNTech vaccine, vaccine side effects, AstraZeneca Oxford coronavirus vaccine, new strain of coronavirus, and more): https://www.medcram.com/courses/coron… We offer over 60 medical topics (ECG Interpretation, DKA, influenza, measles, mechanical ventilation, etc.) on our website and CME for clinicians. MEDCRAM WORKS WITH MEDICAL PROGRAMS AND HOSPITALS: MedCram offers group discounts for students and a variety of medical programs, hospitals, and other institutions. Contact us at customers@medcram.com if you are interested. MEDIA CONTACT: Media Contact: customers@medcram.com Media contact info: https://www.medcram.com/pages/media-c… Video Produced by Kyle Allred FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: https://www.facebook.com/MedCramhttps://twitter.com/MedCramVideoshttps://www.instagram.com/medcram DISCLAIMER: MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor. #COVID19#SARSCoV2#Coronavaccine

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