3 Things To Ask Your Doctor About Breast Cancer Treatment

As far as illnesses go, breast cancer is a relatively common one: 13 percent of women in the United States will develop breast cancer over their lifetime, according to the National Cancer Institute. That works out to one in eight women, so if you know more than eight women, odds are you probably know someone who has had or will be diagnosed with breast cancer in the future.

And if you’re trying to understand your risk of developing breast cancer or if you or a loved one are facing a diagnosis, that means one thing: You probably have questions for a doctor.

To help you assemble your list, we asked Virginia Kaklamani, MD, leader of the Breast Cancer Program at UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, for her advice on what to ask. According to Dr. Kaklamani, there are a few important things to keep in mind as you’re crafting your questions, such as your family history, lifestyle risk factors, and available treatment options.

On the treatment front, Dr. Kaklamani says one of the misconceptions she hears most often is that breast cancer treatment always involves chemotherapy and is very toxic. In response, she reminds people how far treatment options—and the tools we have to determine which treatment may work best for each individual person—have come in the past 20 years.

Case in point: Just last year, a landmark study published in The New England Journal of Medicine showed that, thanks to a genomic test called the Oncotype DX Breast Recurrence Score® test, even more patients with a common type of early-stage breast cancer may be spared chemotherapy than previously thought, including those who are traditionally considered higher-risk due to their cancer spreading to at least one lymph node.

That means more treatment plans tailored to each individual patient, and less of a chance of overprescribing chemo to those who may not benefit from it.

Learning something already? With education in mind, we asked Dr. Kaklamani to share her insights on questions you should ask your doctor about breast cancer—whether you’re trying to stay on top of your health, or you’re exploring your breast cancer treatment options.

What role does race play in breast cancer?

There are many factors that contribute to breast cancer risk, including age, family history, alcohol consumption, obesity, and race. White women are most likely to develop breast cancer, Dr. Kaklamani says, though Black women are more likely to die from it (40 percent more likely, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

Studies have shown that Black women have a higher risk of being diagnosed with later stages of disease,” Dr. Kaklamani says. “So instead of coming in with stage one or stage two, they might come in with stage two or three or even stage four breast cancer. It’s been very hard to understand why.

Most of the data suggests that it’s related both to the type of breast cancer that they get (because they get more triple negative breast cancer—that’s more aggressive, so we tend to find it later), but also to socioeconomic factors.”

By asking your doctor to discuss the connections between race and breast cancer with you, you’ll be able to more openly advocate for yourself and properly assess your personal risk factors.

What types of tests are available to provide insight about a breast cancer treatment plan?

If you have breast cancer, you should definitely ask your doctor for a thorough rundown on your treatment options, Dr. Kaklamani says, starting with the types of tests available to help craft your individual treatment plan.

Genomic tests—like the Oncotype DX® test—look at the specific genes in a tumor to see whether they are over- or under-active. For people diagnosed with early-stage invasive breast cancer (HR-positive and HER2-negative with or without involvement of the lymph nodes), the Oncotype DX Breast Recurrence Score® result tells patients and their doctors not only how aggressive their cancer is and the risk of it returning, but more importantly, whether chemotherapy might be a beneficial treatment option or if it can be safely omitted, Dr. Kaklamani says.

“The good thing about the [result that you get from the Oncotype® test] is that it’s specific to the woman that we are testing,” she says. “All of these clinical trials that we’ve done have included thousands and thousands of women, [but] none of those women are present in my office when I talk to that specific person about their breast cancer. [Each test result] represents that woman’s breast cancer.”

Personalized is obviously better when it comes to something as delicate as cancer treatment (you wouldn’t take someone else’s prescription medicine, would you?), so asking your doctor about genomic testing can help ensure you’re getting a treatment plan that’s properly tailored to your needs.

Should I be doing a self breast exam?

In 2015, the American Cancer Society stopped recommending that people perform their own breast exams, but that doesn’t mean you’re off the hook for keeping tabs on your breast health, Dr. Kaklamani says.

“The guidelines are very clear that there has to be what they call ‘breast self awareness,'” she says. “This is extremely important to be aware of what your breasts look like, and if you do notice something that has changed, that you see your physician immediately.”

Dr. Kaklmani notes that one study showed that nurses who were taught how to properly perform self breast exams were able to accurately detect their breast cancer—demonstrating that if people are properly trained, self breast exams can be effective. That training should fall on gynecologists and primary care physicians, she says, so ask yours for instructions during your next visit.

By: Dr. Kaklamani Paid consultant for Exact Sciences Corporation.

Source: 3 Things To Ask Your Doctor About Breast Cancer Treatment | Well+Good

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How To Talk to Men About Menopause

“It’s remarkable how little men know about menopause,” says Dee Murray. “And that’s strange — because it’s likely to have a far-reaching effect on them, and not just for their romantic relationships, but their relationships with their daughters and colleagues. It’s crucial.”

That’s why Murray, the France-based founder of campaign organization Menopause Experts Group, has created the first training program designed specifically to make men more aware of a still somewhat mysterious and stigmatized  biological phenomena which almost every woman will go through. 

And, lo, it turns out menopause — put simply, the end of a 12-month-long spell during which a woman has had no period, and won’t have again, marking the end of her child-bearing years — is not all about hot flashes, that butt of many a poor joke. It’s not even the most relevant stage of the whole process: that would be what’s called peri-menopause, or the prior, symptomatic phase that may last up to a decade, typically starting around the age of 50 but which can start while a woman is still well within her forties. 

These often misdiagnosed symptoms — running the gamut from itchy skin to a reduction in night vision, from joint pain to tingling extremities, from brain fog and memory loss to depression, a loss of libido, vaginal atrophy and, yes, hot flashes — are all hormonal, connected to a loss of estrogen.

“For a long time women’s health has generally been spoken about only within women’s circles, and I think while women tend to be nurturers, and so know about men’s health, the reverse has not been the case. Men tend to be fixers and get frustrated when there’s no clear solution,” reckons Murray, who suggests that the same furtiveness that long surrounded the topic of menstruation, and before that even pregnancy, still blights open conversation about menopause. 

“We can’t blame men for not understanding menopause. It’s surprising how many women I speak to don’t either, how many younger women are unsympathetic towards those in middle age. It’s one of those messy bits of female biology that society prefers to hide away, and especially from men,” she adds.

Indeed, that menopause is still taboo is a product, she argues, not only of ageism, but in part also of vanity: women in a lookist society often refuse to admit they’re peri-menopausal, a particularly challenging thing to accept for some, it’s argued, when their daughters are often simultaneously at the most vital stage in a human lifespan. The impact of this on couples getting along day to day, on their parenting, on their sex life, can be huge. A shared understanding of what’s going on, and the options for response, could save a marriage.

“Men need to understand just how complex, physically but also psychologically, peri-menopause can be for women, and the more info there is about it, targeted at them, the easier it is for them to offer support, to help take away the pressure, to not misunderstand their partner’s mood or behavior,” says Murray, who has also provided menopause training to the diverse likes of the Finastra financial services giant and London’s Metropolitan Police force. “The situation is improving. I’ve been at board meetings with a table of men and when you tell them you’re a menopause educator you suddenly find you’re holding court — because they all know that they need to know.”

There’s a broader pressure to know, too. And it merits a response. Figures internationally are hard to find, but in the U.K. at least, employment tribunals citing menopause have quadrupled since 2018 — a catalogue of bosses having made light of the symptoms, of said symptoms effectively disabling employees. In most countries the law lags far behind a growing awareness of menopause’s potential impact. 

“The fact is that the understanding of menopause has an impact on society at large,” argues Dr. Helena McKeown, a menopause specialist and ex-chief officer of the British Medical Association. “It has a big impact on productivity and staff retention. It’s a massive reason for women to leave the workforce, for example. Women don’t often experience all of the symptoms of peri-menopause, but sometimes just enough to stop them working efficiently, which leads to self-doubt, Imposter Syndrome, and so on, and yet employers don’t typically talk about this or address it. That’s no surprise when there’s this unconscious bias against it, and that’s not just among the half of the population that won’t experience it.”

Certainly, McKeown adds, look at the big picture and the discourse around menopause is political, as well. It’s one of a number of women’s health issues not well researched because there are so many variables in different women’s experience of it. “When many of us now live well into our 80s, menopause is something that’s going to happen to a lot of women a little more than half way through their life,” she says. “In terms of its relevance then to our working and home lives, that makes the menopause a societal issue as well, not just a women’s issue.”

It’s only in recent years that men have been encouraged to become much more involved in pregnancy, through the likes of attending antenatal classes and, in some countries at least, winning a right to paid paternity leave. So there’s catch-up to do with men’s understanding of and regard for the effects of menopause. What may shift the balance is, perhaps, a more comprehensive visibility for the changes of middle age, beyond the cliché of the mid-life crisis. As McKeown notes, “talk to some men about menopause and their first reaction is still ‘Well, men experience this too…””

In other words, maybe men would be more appreciative of the impact of menopause if it was framed in the context of their own experience: the typically far less extreme, less commonplace, but even less well-understood andropause, when a drop in testosterone levels can bring similar adverse effects to the male mind and body. But lesson one of understanding menopause is, well, that it’s not all about you. 

By Josh Sims

Source: https://www.insidehook.com/

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One Major Side Effect of Eating Boiled Eggs, Experts Say

A hard-boiled egg can be a good source of protein that takes the edge off hunger, but the new “boiled egg diet” takes things a little too far. That’s what two dietitians believe, as a restrictive new weight-loss trend is said to be gaining momentum on social media. What exactly is the boiled egg diet? Here’s important insight you should know.

Keep reading to learn a major side effect of going on the boiled egg diet, and sign up for the Eat This, Not That! newsletter for the nutrition news you need. Also, don’t miss This Gone-Viral Way to Cook Eggs Is Dangerous, Say Experts.

Women’s Health has reported on the boiled egg diet, which apparently is stirring buzz online. This diet isn’t exactly what it sounds like (fortunately). While it is composed of boiled eggs, that’s not all that’s on the menu. According to WH, the boiled egg diet also includes a list of lean proteins (fish, pork, poultry minus skin), non-starchy vegetables (think leafy greens, broccoli, bell peppers, asparagus, and carrots), a very select handful of fruits (berries, lemons, grapefruit and watermelon), and minimal fats (butter, mayonnaise, and coconut oil).

RELATED: One Major Effect of Eating Fruit Every Day, Says New Study

The boiled egg component of the diet generally comes in as the diet calls for an individual to eat two eggs with fruit at breakfast, then vegetables with eggs or another lean protein at both lunch and dinner, according to registered dietitian and nutritionist Erin Palinski-Wade.

RELATED: Unhealthiest Proteins for Weight Loss, According to Experts

Anytime you subtract all the carbohydrates from your diet, it’s going to help you lose weight—but not in a healthy way. Palinski-Wade says the problem with the boiled egg diet is that it doesn’t provide your body with all the nutrition you need.

To this point, WH also cites Keri Gans, another registered dietitian and nutritionist, listing the foods that are off limits on the boiled egg diet: “[…T]he diet suggests avoiding all processed foods, and even other veggies like potatoes, corn, peas, and legumes. You’re also asked to avoid some fruits: bananas, pineapple, mango, dried fruits, and sweetened beverages.”

Just one example of why this isn’t ideal for your health comes from a brand-new study that’s stressing why eating whole grains is so important to cardiovascular health, and how whole grains can even help you lose weight.

A couple hard-boiled eggs are a good snack now and then, but several a day? It wouldn’t be sustainable for most people to diet successfully, Palinski-Wade suggests.

Also, it’s important to remember that while eggs have some super health benefits, they’re also a source of cholesterol and saturated fat. If you’re not egged-out, peek at One Major Side Effect of Eating Too Many Eggs, Says Science.

Keep reading:

Krissy Gasbarre

Source: One Major Side Effect of Eating Boiled Eggs, Experts Say | Eat This Not That

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Find These Easy Ways To Burn Weight:

Breakfast for dinner doesn’t have to mean a sad plate of scrambled eggs. Try this frittata recipe: Beat 6 eggs with black pepper, a pinch of salt and Parmesan cheese. Sauté 1/2 cup of chopped asparagus and 1/2 cup of chopped lean ham in 1 teaspoon of melted butter or coconut oil for 3 minutes in an oven-safe pan. Add the egg mixture to the pan and stir gently. Cook until the egg mixture has set on the bottom, about 4 minutes, and sprinkle with parsley. Place the pan in the oven and broil for about 3 minutes, or until the frittata is lightly browned. Serves 3.

Slipping some egg onto your sandwich is an easy way to boost your midday protein intake and ward off mid-afternoon hunger pangs. Try topping a lunch BLT with avocado slices and an egg for a slimming protein-and-healthy-fat combo. Dining at home? Cook an egg sunny side up for your sandwich. The yolk makes a sauce for the whole dish that’s worth breaking out the fork and knife.

You can make your own fried rice quickly and easily. This recipe is perfect on those rights when you need some energizing—stat! Boil 1 cup of water with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and 2 tablespoons of low-sodium soy sauce. Add 1 cup of instant rice and stir. Remove from heat, cover and let sit for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, heat 1 teaspoon of sesame oil in a wok or skillet over medium heat, before sautéing 1/2 cup each of onions, green beans and bean sprouts and 2 garlic cloves for 2 to 3 minutes. Pour in 1 beaten egg and scramble for 2 minutes before stirring in the rice and mix. Top it off with 2 finely chopped green onions and a dash of pepper. Top with stir-fried chicken breast or grilled shrimp.

A big bowl of oatmeal is your morning go-to now, right? Right? Good! Now take that big boost of energy to the next level with a cooking trick. Get a little extra protein by stirring in a whole egg while your oats are cooking. (Tip: Add some sweetness before serving by drizzling it all with vanilla extract and a sprinkle of cinnamon.) Similarly, you can thicken up broths and soups by adding a beaten egg at the end of cooking; just stir and remove from heat.

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Control of Genes Could Explain Why Females Suffer Worse Virus Infection

A university study could explain why females may suffer worse outcomes of virus infection such as Covid-19. Researchers from the University of Dundee’s School of Life Sciences found the control of genes on X chromosomes in females can cause much wider effects on cells than previously realised.

The X chromosome – of which females have two and men have only one – contains more than 1,000 genes that are vital for cell development. However, a double dose of such gene products can be lethal, meaning one of the two chromosomes in female cells shuts down in a process known as X chromosome inactivation (XCI).

The team found that issues with the XCI process in female cells can cause major changes in protein levels. Proteins are the main targets of almost every drug and differences in the levels of a cell are frequently responsible for many different types of disease, including cancer.

Alejandro Brenes, an analytics developer at the university school, said: “This study has revealed major consequences for the female cells if the XCI mechanism is defective. “By analyzing a collection of human stem cells from both healthy male and female donors, we found that a defective XCI increased the levels of thousands of proteins from all chromosomes, many of which are known markers of disease.

“The data can help to explain why some people may be more likely to develop specific types of disease, suffer worse outcomes of virus infection, such as Covid-19, or vary in how they respond to treatments and therapy. “The results could also be important for the safe development of stem cell therapies.

COVID-19, has been said to affect men and women differently, with men thought to be more likely to become severely ill and die from the disease.To find out more about sex differences in COVID-19, we spoke to Professor Sabra Klein, from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

According to data from around the world, including preliminary data from the UK, an equal number of males and females contract the disease, but do we see the same symptoms?Where we are seeing real differences, in terms of larger magnitude of a male-female difference is in severity of disease.

When the virus enters our body, it needs to enter our cells in order to replicate. Successfully making it into the cell, the virus tries to replicate itself. Estrogen in women is thought to make this harder, meaning that the virus can’t make as many copies of itself in women.

Once the immune system realizes the virus has infiltrated its cells, it launches an attack to try and clear out the infection from its cells.

Generally speaking, women tend to mount more robust immune responses that can be beneficial for initially recognizing and initiating the clearance of a virus. So that can be beneficial. Where it can be detrimental is if long-term responses are not properly regulated, so you can get excessive immune responses that can contribute to long-term inflammation and that in and of itself can cause some tissue damage.

In addition to these sex differences in physiology, there are also important behavioral differences. Men are less likely to go to hospital until later in their disease. However, as healthcare workers are often women, we may still see a shift away from the male bias of the disease as the pandemic progresses.

“It also highlights the importance of sex-specific studies, as there are still many uncharacterized differences between females and males that need to be better understood in order to advance precision medicine.” The study, Erosion of human X chromosome inactivation causes major remodeling of the iPSC proteome, is published in Cell Reports and can be found online.

By: Douglas Barrie

Source: Control of genes could explain why females suffer worse virus infection – study

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The Menstrual Month: How To Exercise Effectively At Every Stage Of Your Cycle

The physiological changes that take place around a woman’s period can affect her training. Experts assess when to take it easy – and when you should go hard

When Evgenia Koroleva started learning about her menstrual cycle and the effect it was having on her, week to week, she says: “It blew my mind. Why did I know so little about my body?” A gym owner, Koroleva has since created a training programme based around an individual’s cycle, which she says will optimise results.

Hers is not the first to take the menstrual cycle into consideration when it comes to exercise. Interest has grown hugely in recent years, with elite athletes tracking physiological changes and coaches educating themselves about the effects. For the rest of us, there are apps and cycle trackers, but the area is still woefully under-researched (blame male-dominated medicine and sport).Advertisement

There are also a lot of conflicting results, while almost half of the existing studies are low quality, says Kelly Lee McNulty, a PhD student at Northumbria University, who is investigating the effects of the menstrual cycle on performance, adaptation and recovery. “While performance and training based on the menstrual cycle is such an interesting concept, and very popular at the moment, there’s not enough published high-quality evidence,” she says.

(There is even less on the impact of hormonal contraception on exercise performance, so where we refer here to the menstrual cycle, it is for women who are not on the pill or using an implant.) However, there are generalities that could be helpful for some women. Here is how your cycle may be affecting your workout.

Get to know your cycle

The 28-day cycle is split into two halves – follicular and luteal, either side of ovulation. Very broadly, taking a 28-day cycle as the textbook example, McNulty defines the most-relevant phases as early follicular (days one to five), with low oestrogen and progesterone; late follicular (days six to 12), with high oestrogen and low progesterone; and mid-luteal (days 20 to 23), with high oestrogen and progesterone. “Women are so different; we experience our menstrual cycles differently and a blanket approach is not going to work for everyone,” she says.

Collect your own data, she advises – there are numerous apps, but a notebook is fine – “and then look for patterns”. If one week you can blitz a high-intensity workout and the next you can barely make it through, it doesn’t mean your fitness has gone backwards. If your motivation is suffering, it doesn’t mean you are a failure. It could all simply be hormonal. “Then you’ve got hormone fluctuations daily, so it all becomes more complex,” McNulty says.

Try exercising through the symptoms

“There are more than 150 symptoms, like breast pain, headaches and nausea … potentially, that’s a time to decrease training if you’re not feeling it,” says McNulty. “But then it’s also been shown that moderate-intensity exercise, like yoga, is beneficial for premenstrual symptoms.” Around days three to five of your period, oestrogen starts to increase, “so you might be starting to feel better and up for exercise around that time”. Koroleva says: “Training on your period is a good way to offset your symptoms.”

Push yourself up to week three …

In the late follicular and the mid-luteal phases, oestrogen is higher. McNulty says one of its many effects is to help build muscle mass. “This is when we can really push female bodies,” says Koroleva. “For the first three weeks, we push you in terms of strength training and add cardio to it. Our bodies don’t have a huge amount of testosterone, but it rises during ovulation and this makes it an ideal time to really push, because of the energy levels.”

This is the time when you might set your personal bests and “sail through high-intensity training”, she says. However, it is not a given. “In that mid-luteal phase, progesterone rises; that has its own physiological effects, so you might not notice that difference,” she says. “It’s just being aware of what might work for you.”

… but be wary of injury around ovulation time

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There is some evidence that, when oestrogen is high, around the late follicular phase, there is an increased risk of injury, because the hormone makes ligaments and tendons more lax. For instance, an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (in the knee) may be more likely. “It’s something to be aware of, but I would never say not to train,” says McNulty. “But if you know this phase might have certain increased injury risks, you could warm up better.”

Take advantage of oestrogen

While it might make you more prone to injury, oestrogen also provides benefits. It is thought to have a positive effect on mood, “so this might increase your motivation to train,” says McNulty. “It has neuromuscular effects as well, so it can signal to increase your ability to activate your muscles. There is evidence to suggest that our ability to recover from training is improved, as oestrogen is thought to have a protective function against muscle damage.” It also reduces the inflammatory response, so it could reduce muscle soreness. “This might mean that we recover more quickly and therefore adapt to training more readily.”

Burn fat

Oestrogen is also thought to reduce the amount of carbohydrate the body uses as the fuel for exercise, instead burning fat. “In theory, it might be that, when oestrogen is high, your body might use more fats for energy – but, again, there are conflicting research findings,” says McNulty. There is some evidence that the metabolism speeds up towards the end of the cycle (and this may be why you get cravings for carbs). “On any weight-loss programme, the point is to put the body into a calorie deficit,” says Koroleva.

However, if you go too far, it can be counterproductive. “If you’re trying to lose weight and you’re in the second phase of your cycle, if you’re doing high-intensity training and you don’t add carbohydrates and increase your calories, your body can actually start to hold on to the weight. It’s almost counterintuitive, but, because of the hormonal changes, the calories need to increase.”

Don’t overheat in week four

In the mid-luteal phase, progesterone rises along with oestrogen. This may limit some of the effects of oestrogen, but it has its own consequences, says McNulty. “It increases your basal body temperature, so, if you’re doing an endurance sport, you might be struggling in a hot environment a little bit more in that mid-luteal phase and you might have to adopt cooling strategies.” Progesterone is also a “calming hormone”, she says. It may increase sleep, but also can affect the way the brain picks up new skills. Trying to perfect a dance routine, or change your golf technique, may be more difficult during this phase.

Take it easy

“After the third week, taper down and do more restorative exercise, such as yoga or pilates,” says Koroleva. “It’s not the time to try to beat any records or do much strength training. If you’re trying to lose weight, it’s a really good time to do long walks and low-intensity training. In a world where we’re surrounded by these super high-intensity workouts and we beat our bodies into the ground, working with your cycle is a much kinder way to look after your body.”

Emine Saner

By: Emine Saner@eminesaner Tue 2 Feb 2021 11.30 GMT

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Joanna Soh Official

SUBSCRIBE for new videos every week! https://www.youtube.com/user/joannaso…​ Ladies, WE ARE NOT MEN! Our body does not function like a MAN, we go through our monthly menstrual cycle, hence our hormones go up and down almost every week. Don’t expect to TRAIN LIKE A MAN! Don’t feel bad when you can’t push as hard on certain days but that also doesn’t mean you should just sit back and do nothing. WATCH this video through to understand the Menstrual Cycle and how we women CAN adjust our exercise routine and also food intake to match our body’s internal rhythms and even help with weight loss. Joanna Soh is a certified Personal Trainer (ACE), Women’s Fitness Specialist (NASM) and Nutrition Coach (VN), with over 8 years experience. Link to 28-Day Workout Plan According to

Menstrual Cycle: http://joannasoh.com/fitness/fitness-…​ Period & Exercising: Everything You Need to Know https://youtu.be/ie9uB2iU97I​ Healthy Ways to Overcome Period Cravings https://youtu.be/nB7cCrik6hM​ __________ Stay Connected & Follow us! Joanna Soh: http://joannasoh.com/https://www.instagram.com/joannasohof…https://www.facebook.com/joannasohoff…https://www.youtube.com/user/joannaso…https://twitter.com/Joanna_Soh​ HER Network: https://www.hernetwork.tvhttps://www.facebook.com/hernetwork.tvhttps://www.instagram.com/hernetwork.tv​ __________ In general, the menstrual cycle occurs in two phases. On average, it’s a 28-day cycle. 1) FOLLICULAR Phase – Day 1 to Day 14 – Go hard! Do high intensity workouts, lift heavy and perform total body strength training. – Your body is more tolerant to pain and muscles recover quicker. – Your body uses Carbs as its main source of fuel. –

You can increase your carb intake slightly especially after an intense workout. 2) LUTEAL Phase – Day 14 to Day 28 – I like to call this phase the “roller coaster” phase. – this is when all the PMS symptoms start to hit: you might crave for sugar or high fat food, you have bigger appetite, you feel sluggish, you have trouble sleeping, your body retains more water, you feel bloated and you might suffer from mild cramps too. – Your body turns to FAT AS FUEL instead of carbs. – Good news, your body is now burning FAT rather than carbs or glycogen. Focus on steady pace cardio to get the most out of your workout. – This is also when the muscle breakdown increases, hence it takes longer for you to recover from your workout. So choose moderation workout that’s less intense. – You might lose your motivation BUT power through your workout, as much as possible, eat well and you WILL feel better.

We are all very different and it takes time to really understand your body. If you have this knowledge, you’re able to take advantage of the hormonal benefits and overcome the challenges by adjusting and changing your workout routine and also food intake. Again, remember this is a guideline as there is very limited research in regards to training with your menstrual cycle. Give it a try, make changes and see what works for you. __________ MUSIC Daily Beetle by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/…​) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-…​ Artist: http://incompetech.com/

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