Your Brain Can Only Take So Much Focus

The ability to focus is an important driver of excellence. Focused techniques such as to-do lists, timetables, and calendar reminders all help people to stay on task. Few would argue with that, and even if they did, there is evidence to support the idea that resisting distraction and staying present have benefits: practicing mindfulness for 10 minutes a day, for example, can enhance leadership effectiveness by helping you become more able to regulate your emotions and make sense of past experiences. Yet as helpful as focus can be, there’s also a downside to focus as it is commonly viewed.

The problem is that excessive focus exhausts the focus circuits in your brain. It can drain your energy and make you lose self-control. This energy drain can also make you more impulsive and less helpful. As a result, decisions are poorly thought-out, and you become less collaborative.

So what do we do then? Focus or unfocus?

In keeping with recent research, both focus and unfocus are vital. The brain operates optimally when it toggles between focus and unfocus, allowing you to develop resilience, enhance creativity, and make better decisions too.

When you unfocus, you engage a brain circuit called the “default mode network.” Abbreviated as the DMN, we used to think of this circuit as the Do Mostly Nothing circuit because it only came on when you stopped focusing effortfully. Yet, when “at rest”, this circuit uses 20% of the body’s energy (compared to the comparatively small 5% that any effort will require).

The DMN needs this energy because it is doing anything but resting. Under the brain’s conscious radar, it activates old memories, goes back and forth between the past, present, and future, and recombines different ideas. Using this new and previously inaccessible data, you develop enhanced self-awareness and a sense of personal relevance. And you can imagine creative solutions or predict the future, thereby leading to better decision-making too. The DMN also helps you tune into other people’s thinking, thereby improving team understanding and cohesion.

There are many simple and effective ways to activate this circuit in the course of a day.

Using positive constructive daydreaming (PCD): PCD is a type of mind-wandering different from slipping into a daydream or guiltily rehashing worries. When you build it into your day deliberately, it can boost your creativity, strengthen your leadership ability, and also-re-energize the brain. To start PCD, you choose a low-key activity such as knitting, gardening or casual reading, then wander into the recesses of your mind.

But unlike slipping into a daydream or guilty-dysphoric daydreaming, you might first imagine something playful and wishful—like running through the woods, or lying on a yacht. Then you swivel your attention from the external world to the internal space of your mind with this image in mind while still doing the low-key activity.

Studied for decades by Jerome Singer, PCD activates the DMN and metaphorically changes the silverware that your brain uses to find information. While focused attention is like a fork—picking up obvious conscious thoughts that you have, PCD commissions a different set of silverware—a spoon for scooping up the delicious mélange of flavors of your identity (the scent of your grandmother, the feeling of satisfaction with the first bite of apple-pie on a crisp fall day), chopsticks for connecting ideas across your brain (to enhance innovation), and a marrow spoon for getting into the nooks and crannies of your brain to pick up long-lost memories that are a vital part of your identity.

In this state, your sense of “self” is enhanced—which, according to Warren Bennis, is the essence of leadership. I call this the psychological center of gravity, a grounding mechanism (part of your mental “six-pack”) that helps you enhance your agility and manage change more effectively too.

Taking a nap: In addition to building in time for PCD, leaders can also consider authorized napping. Not all naps are the same. When your brain is in a slump, your clarity and creativity are compromised. After a 10-minute nap, studies show that you become much clearer and more alert. But if it’s a creative task you have in front of you, you will likely need a full 90 minutes for more complete brain refreshing. Your brain requires this longer time to make more associations, and dredge up ideas that are in the nooks and crannies of your memory network.

Pretending to be someone else: When you’re stuck in a creative process, unfocus may also come to the rescue when you embody and live out an entirely different personality. In 2016, educational psychologists, Denis Dumas and Kevin Dunbar found that people who try to solve creative problems are more successful if they behave like an eccentric poet than a rigid librarian. Given a test in which they have to come up with as many uses as possible for any object (e.g. a brick) those who behave like eccentric poets have superior creative performance. This finding holds even if the same person takes on a different identity.

When in a creative deadlock, try this exercise of embodying a different identity. It will likely get you out of your own head, and allow you to think from another person’s perspective. I call this psychological halloweenism.

For years, focus has been the venerated ability amongst all abilities. Since we spend 46.9% of our days with our minds wandering away from a task at hand, we crave the ability to keep it fixed and on task. Yet, if we built PCD, 10- and 90- minute naps, and psychological halloweenism into our days, we would likely preserve focus for when we need it, and use it much more efficiently too. More importantly, unfocus will allow us to update information in the brain, giving us access to deeper parts of ourselves and enhancing our agility, creativity and decision-making too.

By: Srini Pillay

Srini Pillay, M.D. is an executive coach and CEO of NeuroBusiness Group. He is also a technology innovator and entrepreneur in the health and leadership development sectors, and an award-winning author. His latest book is Tinker, Dabble, Doodle, Try: Unlock the Power of the Unfocused Mind. He is also a part-time Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School and teaches in the Executive Education Programs at Harvard Business School and Duke Corporate Education, and is on internationally recognized think tanks.

Source: Your Brain Can Only Take So Much Focus

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Srini Pillay, M.D. is an executive coach and CEO of NeuroBusiness Group. He is also a technology innovator and entrepreneur in the health and leadership development sectors, and an award-winning author. His latest book is Tinker, Dabble, Doodle, Try: Unlock the Power of the Unfocused Mind. He is also a part-time Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School and teaches in the Executive Education Programs at Harvard Business School and Duke Corporate Education, and is on internationally recognized think tanks.

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Right-Brained Children in a Left-Brained World: Unlocking the Potential of Your ADD Child

Behavioral and Physiological Bases of Attentional Biases: Paradigms

Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults: ADHD, Bipolar, OCD, Asperger’s, Depression, and Other Disorders

Updated European Consensus Statement on diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD

Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Differential Diagnoses

Cognitive Psychology and Its Implications

Stimulus-Driven Reorienting Impairs Executive Control of Attention: Evidence for a Common Bottleneck in Anterior Insula

Functions of the human frontoparietal attention network: Evidence from neuroimaging

Bottom-up saliency and top-down learning in the primary visual cortex of monkeys

The extent of processing of noise elements during selective encoding from visual displays

Testing the behavioral interaction and integration of attentional networks

Perceptual Load Affects Eyewitness Accuracy and Susceptibility to Leading Questions

wo Polarities of Attention in Social Contexts: From Attending-to-Others to Attending-to-Self

Selective attention and serial processing in briefly presented visual displays

3 Things To Know Before You Arm Your Employees With Fitness Trackers

Even the most seasoned and well-adjusted remote workers know the risk: If you’re not careful, working from home can bring your physical activity to a standstill.

Employers know this too. Increasingly, they are looking for ways to bolster their wellness programs by offering fitness trackers, such as those made by Fitbit, Garmin, and Amazon, to help employees log more movement during the day. Another popular option called Oura makes smart rings that can track sleep, fitness, temperature, and even signs of illness. An Oura dashboard even lets employers view the likelihood of illness across their entire workforce.

Employees who log a certain amount of physical activity can then receive insurance discounts through many major health insurance companies, such as UnitedHealth Group, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Cigna, and Aetna. Beneficiaries can get reimbursed for prescription co-pays and other health care costs under their deductibles.

But fitness trackers in the workplace, and health surveillance in general, also carry considerable privacy risks. More than 60 million records from Fitbit, Apple, and other companies were compromised in June after a data breach on GetHealth, a third-party group that provides employee fitness incentives.

Data breaches of fitness trackers like Strava have revealed personal details such as the name and location of participants, even in anonymized data. Security risks aside, you may not even want to have so many personal details about your employees at your fingertips. After all, constant surveillance won’t exactly put your team at ease.

Before offering fitness trackers to your employees, here are a few things you should keep in mind:

1. Fitness trackers will save you money on premiums, for now.

Workplace fitness-tracker programs often offer discounts on insurance premiums if employees meet certain fitness goals. Some employees can earn as much as $1,500 a year they can apply toward their health insurance premiums. Workers can get free or discounted wearables, workout clothing, and even gym equipment. On the employer side, a few studies have shown that fitness trackers can help you save money on premiums. But some companies have reported that their insurance costs have remained the same.

At present, there are no laws or regulations in place to stop insurers from using fitness-tracker data to raise premiums. In an article published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers from the AMA raised concerns that such data could increase insurance premiums for some groups.

“Wearables can collect information on physical activity, calorie intake, blood pressure, and weight. Insurance companies are now using this data for rewards programs, but there are no regulations stopping them from doing the opposite,” wrote the authors.

2. The data your employees share isn’t protected by HIPAA.

Health care providers and health insurers are barred from sharing any patient information by HIPAA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. But that ban doesn’t extend to Google, Apple, or any private companies through which employees elect to share their health care data. As The Wall Street Journal reports, there’s nothing under HIPAA that would bar third-party companies from analyzing or selling the health care data users voluntarily give up.

If you’re looking to adopt fitness-tracker programs, read up on the device-maker’s privacy policies and be prepared to answer questions from employees. You will have the added responsibility of explaining to workers how much access your own company has to their data, and how it’s being used. Workers need to understand that you will not be using data from the fitness trackers against them, and are under no obligation to sign up for the program.

3. The research on fitness-tracker effectiveness is mixed.

For some people, wearing a device that tracks their activity levels is enough of a reason to get off the sofa. But changing health habits permanently requires a lot more effort. One study published in The Lancet from researchers at the Duke-NUS Medical School found that wearing an activity tracker, along with a cash incentive, improved the fitness levels of employees.

But after the cash incentive was discontinued after six months, employees didn’t maintain their previous fitness levels. The study also compared employees who wore fitness trackers with those who did not, and found no real difference in the amount of activity performed.

But a number of other studies indicate that fitness trackers do help increase activity levels, either by small or moderate amounts. In one analysis of 28 studies with more than 7,000 participants published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers found that those with fitness trackers were more physically active than those in groups without. Added features like setting personal goals and text reminders were the most effective in getting people to exercise.

If your company chooses to enroll in a fitness-tracker program, keep in mind that you’re unlikely to entice all of your employees to adopt it. If you want to help improve the health of workers, you can also try methods like subsidized gym memberships, healthy food choices at work, or reimbursement for fitness equipment. While fitness trackers can certainly play a role in improving health outcomes, they are just one tool. Substantive lifestyle changes, including good nutrition, sleep, and fitness, also are required.

Correction: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that the fitness tracker Strava had a data breach that revealed personal details such as the name and location of participants, including in anonymized data. According to Strava spokesman, the company has never had a data breach.

By Amrita Khalid, Staff writer@askhalid

Source: 3 Things to Know Before You Arm Your Employees With Fitness Trackers | Inc.com

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Related Contents:

Böhm, B; Karwiese, SD; Böhm, H; Oberhoffer, R (30 April 2019). “Effects of Mobile Health Including Wearable Activity Trackers to Increase Physical Activity Outcomes Among Healthy Children and Adolescents: Systematic Review”. JMIR mHealth and uHealth. 7 (4): e8298. doi:10.2196/mhealth.8298. PMC 6658241. PMID 31038460.

 

Should Businesses Force Employees to Get Covid Vaccine? Advice From a Lawyer

With the Covid-19 vaccine rollout steadily gathering steam, and an overwhelming desire to get back to business, companies face a difficult choice: should they force employees to get vaccinated? And if not, how can they encourage workers to roll up their sleeves? Bloomberg Businessweek spoke to Kevin Troutman, a Houston-based lawyer who co-chairs the national healthcare practice of the law firm Fisher Phillips. This interview has been condensed.

Could an employer face some liability if its workers arent vaccinated?

Workers comp laws are the exclusive remedy for illnesses and injuries contracted in the workplace. But employers also have to be concerned about following OSHA guidance, and we expect that OSHA is going to be issuing some COVID-specific standards. They’re going to at least say, I think, make the vaccines available to your employees, and it will be a violation if then you fail to do it. You could be fined and penalized and, you know, OSHA can hand out some substantial fines. So it can be it can be pretty significant.

What should employers do then to encourage employees to take the vaccine?

One thing that is really important is to share reliable objective information with employees, to try to dispel any misunderstandings or misconceptions that are out there. Ideally, the information should come from local healthcare providers — maybe arrange for a doctor in the community to just come out and maybe talk to their employees, answer some questions and help employees to understand the issues better.

If leaders of the organization believe that vaccinations are the right thing to do, and they are out there explaining it, and providing reliable information, and even setting an example and saying, “Hey, I’m getting vaccinated,” I think those things will help get employees more comfortable with taking the vaccine.

What about offering incentives for getting vaccinated?

A lot of employers think, “Well, I’ll just offer some money and, and get people to take the vaccination, and it’s as simple as that.” Unfortunately, it’s not as simple as that. All medical information is supposed to be treated as confidential — you’re not supposed to get that information and then use disability-related information to discriminate against an employee.

The thinking has been that if an incentive is large enough, that might make some employees feel pressured to disclose medical information in order to qualify for the incentive. On January 7, the EEOC issued a proposed rule that you can only offer what they call a “de minimis incentive” — like a water bottle or a gift card of modest value, which we think is around $20 or $25. Those rules were put on hold as part of the transition in administration and then withdrawn, so right now the EEOC stance is in limbo.

Now, a lot of employers are saying, “we’ll pay you for your time to get vaccinated, and maybe allow two hours or something like that.” I think this is a good approach. The employer can say it’s not an incentive. If the EEOC disagreed, the next thing you do is say that’s not enough to be coercive.

What are the risks to requiring your employees to get vaccinated?

Well, if you’re able to work through the people who say they need an accommodation, because of disability or religion, then the risks are you’re going to have 20 to 40 percent of your workforce just very upset, very distracted and not as productive as they would be. Do you want to have to fire them? You probably could legally, but as a practical matter, do you want to fire that many employees?

Is that worse for your company than having 20 or 40 percent of your employees not vaccinated?

I think each company has to decide. It depends a little bit on what you do, and how much interaction do you have with the public. One place it would make a lot of sense to mandate vaccines would be health care, where you’ve got some responsibility for the health and safety not just of yourself and your employees, but of people who are placed in your care. But even in the healthcare industry, I’m not seeing a huge rush to mandate vaccines. They’re making it available. But they’re not mandating it, whereas they have required flu shots.

Have you seen any particular industries that are inclined to mandate vaccinations?

We did a flash survey among clients and people who maintain regular contact with us. We got about 700 responses, and the agricultural and food production industry was at the top of the list among our respondents as to who was expecting to mandate the vaccination. But that was still only about 18 percent of the group.

How might this conversation be different in, say, July or August?

I think the legal issues are going to stay largely the same unless we get more guidance on incentives. From a practical point of view, by mid summer, we should see that a lot more people have been vaccinated. And we’re also going to have more data and more information to tell us more about side effects, and effectiveness of the vaccination. And we may know more about the extent to which being vaccinated prevents a person from transmitting the virus.

All of which will enable us then to improve our messaging to our employees, about why the vaccine makes sense and the risks, or lack of risks, associated with it compared to the benefits. And that’s going to give businesses a better idea of what’s feasible and what they’re going to do.

By: Robb Mandelbaum

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Data Or Processes: Where To Begin With Intelligent Automation

Over the past year, many clients I’ve spoken with have been looking for ways to make processes smarter, more adaptable and more resilient. According to our recent research, many companies see the combination of AI and automation — or intelligent automation — as key to achieving these goals.

Despite the promise of better operational performance with intelligent automation, a common question is where to begin: with the process itself or with the data that will power the process? The answer lies in identifying which outcome you’re trying to achieve. Getting the sequence wrong could counteract the very goal you’re pursuing.

The right starting point 

Here are two examples that distinguish when a process-led vs. data-led approach makes the most sense with intelligent automation:

How can we improve our operational efficiency?

Amid global uncertainty, supply chain disruptions and social distancing requirements, improving operational efficiency has become a priority for many businesses. The goal in this case is to improve speed and accuracy across the value chain, and achieve outcomes faster without cutting corners.

Adding data intelligence can significantly reduce errors, remove process hurdles and reveal where corrections are needed. But doing so requires a strong process automation backbone in order to shape when and how the data is applied. So in this case, a process-led approach is best.

For example, we’re working with a major insurance provider to improve customer lifecycle management. Typically, insurance customers who file a claim experience long decision times, a lack of visibility into decision making and repeated or disconnected requests for information submission.

Insurers can distinguish themselves by being fast, frictionless and responsive in how they handle claims. However, operating in a highly regulated industry and with overt risks around claims fraud, speed can never be a trade-off for accuracy and compliance.

A contributing factor to the insurer’s process challenges was the dependence on third-party systems and disparate data sources to make decisions. We helped the company implement an automated and fully integrated process for claims handling, which was then supported with AI and data modeling to segment customer profiles and personalize services.

The system has helped reduce the turnaround on claims capture by as much as 80% and shorten overall claims procedure times from 14 days to just two, all while maintaining the necessary high levels of accuracy and regulatory compliance. The insurer has also received positive customer feedback on the effectiveness and quality of services.

How can we be more agile in our product and service offerings?

Leading retailers have an impressive ability to recommend relevant products and anticipate customers’ next actions. Whether shoppers search for a needed item, browse relevant sites or interact with brands across different channels, digitally savvy retailers can connect the dots in real-time and make recommendations with a high degree of precision.

With so many factors and variables at play in dynamic online customer environments, companies need an agile approach that allows them to test the market, gather feedback and continuously improve in order to meet customer needs.

We’re working with an online fashion retailer to deliver this level of personalization. The company is well aware of the speed at which consumers’ tastes and styles change, and realized it needed to move swiftly to gain and keep customers’ attention.

Because it was vital to gain insights into consumer preferences, we took a data-led approach. We helped the retailer use existing data to gain a deeper consumer understanding. Using this insight, we then designed a process that segmented the brand’s customer base and enabled all interactions and product recommendations across channels like chatbots, email and social media to have the highest degree of relevance, timeliness and usefulness.

The combination of process improvements and data insights allowed for an integrated digital thread to run through all phases of the customer lifecycle, including product design and development, sales and after-sales. As a result, the retailer can now drive more relevant customer interactions and next-best offers, which in turn has improved customer mindshare, loyalty and revenue.

Accelerating the path to Intelligent Automation

To get the most out of intelligent automation, process and data need to work in harmony. Automated processes enable greater efficiency, while data enables better decision-making.

By coordinating these attributes — and having a clear outcome in mind — businesses can add intelligence to how and where they automate processes in a way that accelerates business outcomes while ensuring the quality of service is enhanced.

To learn more, visit the Intelligent Process Automation section of our website. View our latest webinar on Redesigning Work for the Post-Pandemic Age.

Chakradhar “Gooty” Agraharam is VP and Commercial Head of EMEA for Cognizant’s Digital Business Operations’ IPA Practice. In this role, he leads advisory, consulting, automation and analytics growth and delivery within the region, helping clients navigate and scale their automation and digital transformation journeys. He has over 25 years of consulting experience, working with clients on large systems integration, program management and transformation consulting programs across Asia, Europe and the Americas. Gooty holds an MBA from IIM, Calcutta (India’s Premier B school), and has executive management certifications from Rutgers, Henley Business School. Gooty has won reputed industry awards with MCA for his contribution to the digital industry in the UK and is a member of various industry forums. He can be reached at Gooty.Agraharam@cognizant.com

Source: Data Or Processes: Where To Begin With Intelligent Automation

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How The COVID Vaccine and Regular Exercise May Increase Effectiveness

And while we’re still waiting for similar studies with COVID-19 vaccines, there’s good reason to believe the same effects would apply, says University of Sydney associate professor of exercise science Kate Edwards, who has extensively researched the links between vaccines and exercise.

Exercise and your immune system

First, it’s important to understand the profound effects of exercise on the immune system. One, Edwards says, is that it puts more immune cells – which kill infected cells and produce antibodies to destroy viral and bacterial antigens – on patrol in the body’s blood circulation. Also, when you work out, your muscles release signalling molecules, called myokines, that help put our body’s defences on high alert. Over the long-term, regular exercise means having a stronger, more responsive immune system.

And this has had repercussions during the pandemic. A US study, published this week in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, examined almost 50,000 patients and concluded that aside from old age or a past organ transplant, physical inactivity was the biggest risk factor for severe symptoms. People who didn’t exercise were more than twice as likely to be hospitalised compared to those who clocked up at least 150 minutes of activity every week. They were also 2.5 times more likely to die of the infection.

The effects of exercise on vaccines

Given all this, it’s perhaps unsurprising that exercise has been shown to improve the efficacy of vaccines. “We see that regular exercise over the course of weeks or months makes vaccine responses stronger and that likely then means you are more protected from the disease,” Edwards says.

A study published last year found that elite athletes had significantly more anti-influenza immune cells after a flu shot compared to other healthy adults. This echoed a 2019 study finding that older adults who trained regularly had a much higher antibody response to healthy adults who didn’t exercise. Consistent exercise after a vaccine is also thought to prolong enhanced protection.

“Vaccination does cause an immune response but because we have more of these immune cells [when we exercise], it’s a much more powerful response,” says Rob Newton, professor of exercise medicine at Edith Cowan University.

Interestingly, exercising on the day of a vaccine has also shown benefits. There’s less evidence for this, Edwards says, but her research suggests it may lead to a stronger immune response, particularly from doing arm movements in the hours before injection.

“You are likely to get more immune cells moving to pick up the vaccine … but also by exercising the muscles where you’ll get the vaccine means you release those immune signals and so it may draw the cells to that location as well.”

“The key is that exercise has no downsides. It gives benefits regardless and the evidence is so strong in a range of other vaccines.”

Professor Rob Newton

What’s even more startling is that being active close to the time of a vaccination – such as flu or HPV – has been found to reduce the risk of suffering from adverse reactions to the jab. Edwards says the effects were observed simply with 15 minutes of moderate resistance band exercise, probably because the immune system was primed and ready for a challenge.

“I would expect exercise in the hour before vaccination and the short period after would have the same effect,” Edwards says. This may be particularly valuable for people who are compromised through age or illness, Newton says.

Preparing for your COVID-19 vaccine

Of course, while this is all compelling evidence, Newton says we can’t be sure the same will apply to COVID-19 vaccines, particularly those that use new mRNA technology, such as Pfizer. “But those pathways still require the involvement of the immune system and the activation of immune cells,” Newton says. “[And] exercise distributes immune factors through the body.”

Newton is frank when he explains how he’ll approach his own COVID-19 vaccine: “I’m already exercising regularly and when it’s my turn to get a vaccination I can tell you I’ll be exercising before I head off to the medical clinic.” He suggests people follow his lead: “The key is that exercise has no downsides. It gives benefits regardless and the evidence is so strong in a range of other vaccines.”

“If you’re particularly worried about a vaccine working well, then exercise is a really good thing to do, but remember it’s important for … all sorts of things.”

Associate Professor Kate Edwards

Edwards agrees: “Certainly what we’ve never seen is exercise making anything worse: immune response or side-effects.” Edwards says because researchers are still exploring why some people are experiencing COVID-19 vaccine side-effects, she recommends not drastically changing your exercise routine on the day of your shot. But if you typically go for a run or do yoga, go for it.

She says it may help to do some light arm exercises close to the time of injection – for example a few sets of wall push-ups, shoulder presses and bicep curls. “Then you might want to consider having a rest day the day after the vaccination because reactions are sometimes being seen 24-48 hours after.”

And while you wait for the rollout to reach you, it’s worth ensuring you have a training routine in place. Australia’s physical activity guidelines for adults aged 18-64 are to have at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week, and two resistance training sessions – the latter of which Edwards particularly recommends for promoting immune function.

The bottom line, though, is working out is good for everybody, for myriad reasons. “If you’re particularly worried about a vaccine working well, then exercise is a really good thing to do, but remember it’s important for chronic disease, mental health, socialisation, all sorts of things,” Edwards says.

Newton says people shouldn’t worry that vigorous exercise will stress their bodies. “Unless you’re an elite athlete it’s very difficult to exercise to excess and compromise your immune system.” He recommends older Australians or people with chronic illness set up an exercise program with the guidance of an accredited exercise physiologist.

Sophie Aubrey

 

By: Sophie Aubrey

Source: How the COVID vaccine and regular exercise may increase effectiveness

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Related Links:

Common Ground: a pandemic influenza simulation exercise for the European Union, 23-24 November 2005

R Kaiser, M Ciotti, G Thinus… – Weekly releases (1997 …, 2005 – eurosurveillance.org
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Exercising in isolation? The role of telehealth in exercise oncology during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond

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Combating physical inactivity during the COVID-19 pandemic

AJ Pinto, DW Dunstan, N Owen, E Bonfá… – Nature Reviews …, 2020 – nature.com
… with systemic lupus erythematosus 9 . Of relevance in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic,
home-based exercise programmes are feasible and can be effective in promoting health benefits
for patients with rheumatic diseases without causing any important adverse events 2,3 …

Self-management strategies to consider to combat endometriosis symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic

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sleep hygiene, low-intensity physical activity (including pelvic exercises, yoga), dietary …

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Parkinson’s disease: hidden sorrows and emerging opportunities

RC Helmich, BR Bloem – Journal of Parkinson’s disease, 2020 – ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
… Nevertheless, a loss of aerobic exercise during the COVID-19 pandemic may well … Furthermore,
reduced physical exercise may contribute to increased psychological stress, thereby further …
Promoting home-based and adequately dosed exercises, such as cycling on a stationary …

Loneliness and social isolation in older adults during the Covid-19 pandemic: Implications for gerontological social work

M Berg-Weger, JE Morley – 2020 – Springer
… Having had to quickly respond during the pandemic necessitated the use of technology … delivery
option, traditional interventions can similarly be offered (eg, exercise, dementia care … eg, interactive
photo sharing, support and learning assistants, online-based websites for pairing …

General practice and pandemic influenza: a framework for planning and comparison of plans in five countries

MS Patel, CB Phillips, C Pearce, M Kljakovic… – PloS one, 2008 – journals.plos.org
… Tools [54], [55] and desktop simulation exercises [19] are available to help GPs plan … This aspect
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Pandemic influenza preparedness and health systems challenges in Asia: results from rapid analyses in 6 Asian countries

P Hanvoravongchai, W Adisasmito… – BMC public …, 2010 – bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com
… Open Access; Published: 08 June 2010. Pandemic influenza preparedness and health
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Have a heart during the COVID-19 crisis: Making the case for cardiac rehabilitation in the face of an ongoing pandemic

TJ Yeo, YTL Wang, TT Low – European journal of preventive …, 2020 – academic.oup.com
… to their mobile devices more than ever, scrutinising social media, news websites and messaging …
Table 1), to ensure that patients keep themselves healthy during the pandemic and do … With
bespoke smartphone applications and wearable activity trackers, exercise can even be …

Enhancing the legitimacy of local government pandemic influenza planning through transparency and public engagement

PE French – Public Administration Review, 2011 – Wiley Online Library
… opportunities for the inclusion of all stakeholders in decision making, mock community‐wide
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