Advertisements

Want Digital Transformation? Encourage Continuous Learning For All Employees – Daniel Newman

1.jpg

Recently, we’ve seen upskilling and retraining programs emerge in workforces across the globe. Companies are taking the time to help their employees learn new skills for new positions as new technology emerges. This is great, don’t get me wrong, but I think we need to focus more on continuous learning for all employees. This definitely would work in conjunction with upskilling programs, but as leaders who are trying to drive transformation, the onus is with us to encourage learning across the organization…….

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2018/10/30/want-digital-transformation-encourage-continuous-learning-for-all-employees/#161288477fe3

 

 

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

Advertisements

The Top 25 Skills Businesses Need Right Now – Larry Kim

1.jpg

A whopping 94% of recruiters actively use LinkedIn to vet candidates. Professionals use LinkedIn when looking for new jobs and to showcase a career and stand out to recruiters. Does your profile have what it takes to stand out from the masses? LinkedIn released a report that reveals the top 25 in-demand business skills searched for in the hiring process. Discover all 25 skills, plus key jobs that use those skills and the salary (national average) of a U.S. professional in that industry according to Glassdoor…..

Read more: https://smallbiztrends.com/2018/09/skills-in-demand.html

 

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you
https://www.paypal.me/ahamidian

 

13 Things Highly Successful People Do Not Waste Their Mental Energy On – Brianna Wiest

1.jpg

Highly successful people (regardless of the variety of ways one could define being “successful”) all seem to understand a few core principles. Chief among them is that it is not your time, but your energy, that is limited each day and therefore, needs to be carefully managed.

This is why you hear stories of extremely accomplished people with odd habits, like eating the same thing for lunch each day or wearing a minimal “uniform” to work. These individuals understand the psychological concept of decision fatigue, which is the way in which the quality of your decision-making capabilities deteriorates over time. Think of it like this: In the morning, your tank is at 100%. As you move through your day, you expend your energy bit by bit. You don’t want to waste it, and unfortunately, most people do.

Often, this happen through something called microdistractions, or issues that are so small that they don’t seem to threaten your stamina, but which are also pertinent enough that they actually exhaust you slowly. Highly successful people do not waste their mental energy on things they don’t need to. Here, some of the sneakiest culprits:

1. Fear of the least likely outcome.

Worrying, though referred to as a “maladaptive trait,” actually has an evolutionary connection to intelligence. This is why highly successful people are often more anxious by nature, Jeremy Coplan, lead author of a study published in Frontiers in Evolutionary Neuroscience, explained to ABC News.

Be that as it is, to function well, you need to be able to discern which fears are worth responding to, and which are just your brain conjuring up the most extreme potential danger in order to “prepare” you to survive. This is an outdated, animalistic mechanism that does not help you in your day-to-day life. Highly successful people do not waste their energy being afraid of that which is least likely to occur

2. Other people’s melodramas.

Anyone can understand how easy it is to get caught up in the intrigue of what’s happening in other people’s lives. (NPR reports that there’s an evolutionary function to this as well, which is that gossip actually helps us predict who is a potential friend or foe.) Regardless, getting caught up to the point of worrying and/or obsessing about someone else’s life status can be paralyzing. Highly successful people prioritize their own wellbeing, and that very rarely includes immersing themselves in petty melodramas that they have no ability to resolve regardless.

3. Microdistractions.

Your push notifications alarm you every time your favorite author posts a new tweet. You don’t lay out your clothes or pack your bag the night before you have to leave for work, and so your first moments of the day are spent scrambling to be on time.

You check and answer emails four times within your first hour of the day. You take a phone call from your mom at 10:15 and it carries on until 11. You scroll mindlessly through your news feeds not to educate yourself on what’s happening on any given day, but as a manner of distracting yourself for a “break.”

It’s easy to see how quickly microdistractions can add up. Before you know it, it’s the afternoon, you feel exhausted and barely anything to show for it. Highly successful people don’t give their mental energy to anything that is not going to have a significant impact on their lives in the long-term. They designate specific hours and times to solely focusing on their most crucial tasks, and then prioritize from there.

4. Ruminating, but not taking action.

The moment when reflecting becomes ruminating is when the intent to act dissolves in place of needlessly replaying certain scenarios or issues through your mind again and again.

Highly successful people are usually very self-aware, or at least try to be. This means that they spend a lot of time reviewing their behaviors and interactions, and evaluating how they can improve. However, they do not waste their mental energy just thinking about what went wrong and not actively changing what they need to make the correction.

5. Getting it “right” the first time.

Highly successful people are often masters of their crafts and leaders in their fields. Their work comes across as innovative, unprecedented, and very detail-oriented. What you might not realize is that it often doesn’t begin that way. People who aspire to be successful often scare themselves into beginning their work just because their first attempts may not compare to someone else’s final product. However, highly successful people do not worry about getting it perfect, they worry about just showing up and beginning. Once the fear of being “wrong” is out of the way, it opens a portal to be more creative and productive. There’s always time to improve later.

6. The opinion of anyone they wouldn’t want to switch places with.

Highly successful people are very aware of the impact that their social circles have on the quality of their lives. They value their mentors, partners and teachers. However, they do not give any weight to the opinions of anyone they would not want to switch places with. In the same manner, they also do not worry about what those people potentially think of them.

7. Feeling guilty about taking time for themselves.

Established people understand that success is a holistic thing. You aren’t able to perform your best if you’re tired, undernourished, or experiencing any other kind of extreme imbalance in your life.

That’s why it’s common to see highly successful people as committed to relaxation and wellness as they are work and productivity. They do not spend time guilting themselves over everything they could have gotten done over a three day weekend, or why they shouldn’t take time off if they really need it.

8. Justifying their place in life.

Often, committing to any kind of work that’s atypical incurs the questions and, at times, judgments of those who either don’t believe in your mission or are skeptical of its future success. However, consistently feeling the need to explain or justify your place in life is not only a tireless pursuit, it’s pointless. You are never going to earn the approval of people who don’t want to give it, and highly successful people understand that.

9. Senseless worrying and unchecked thought patterns.

One of the biggest ways that people rob themselves of their own energy is by worrying. Worrying is the practice of preparing for the worst possible outcome, and then believing it is not only possible, but most likely.

However, worrying does not make you more prepared to cope with life’s difficult moments, it makes you more inclined to actually create your fears. If you were to write down a list of everything you’ve ever worried about in life, you’d find that 99.9% of it was groundless, and didn’t “come true.”

If you were also to make a list of everything you didn’t worry about in life, you’d discover that worrying actually didn’t change the outcome of anything, it only zapped up your energy in the present. And if anything, worrying only made things more difficult and skewed and less enjoyable. It is not productive, and highly successful people train themselves to focus on anything else.

11. Trying to be liked by everyone.

Another striking trait of highly successful people is that they aren’t usually people pleasers. Their worst fear isn’t to be disliked by others, because they understand that they are going to be disliked by some people regardless of what they do in life. Instead, you could say that their real fear is actually not living the way they want and need to be out of fear that it would prevent them from “earning” the love and admiration they are desperate for.

12. Too much positive thinking.

It’s obvious that nobody achieves a great deal of success without overcoming their patterns of negative thinking. What’s less obvious is that highly successful people also don’t engage in an overabundance of positive thinking, as in excess it can often be subjective, skewed, and at times, distracting. Worse, too much positive thinking actually sets them up for failure, or disappointment. Instead, highly successful people master the power of neutral thinking, in which they aren’t trying to filter life to be more or less than what it is.

13. Anything they don’t deem to have long-term value. 

Highly successful people understand that what they put their energy into grows. If they want their worries to grow, they focus on them. If they want their success to grow, they focus on that instead. They are also very focused on the long-term, and therefore, highly successful people do not worry about that which they don’t deem to have value, even if it is something society tells them they should care about. These people are outliers, individualists, and most of all, free thinkers. They do not let their lives be dictated by that which the rest of the world is bogged down by.

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

3 Ways to Instill Lifelong Digital Learning Skills in Students – Matthew Lynch

1.jpeg

Millennials value tech training and development from their employer, above all else, because they know that it will help them compete in a global economy. Interestingly, appropriate tech training and professional development equates to higher job satisfaction. Additionally, improving your tech skills will not only ensure you are a more productive employee, but also a more fulfilled individual overall.

While milestones like high school and college graduations are worth ones to celebrate, they are never an end date for learning new tech skills. Lifelong digital learning, the kind that goes beyond what is needed in the moment or to perform well at modern jobs, is essential.

Yet the U.S. tends to put a time stamp on learning and it is often assumed that individuals learning and education halts at age 18 or 22, when they enter the workforce. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, on average by age 40 a person has held 10 different jobs.

That means those job-specific tech skills learned in college classrooms, while still valuable, aren’t as relevant when the next job or career comes along. With technology changing job fields so drastically, it is now more even more imperative to continue learning new tech skills, in order to be the most well rounded, productive worker possible.

So what are some ways that the education and edtech community can foster this spirit of continued digital learning while children are still in classrooms?

Teach basic tech literacy.

All kids, regardless of what they hope to accomplish in their careers, need a basic technology skill set that simply did not exist a generation of K-12 students ago. This tech literacy must happen early, and be fostered in ways that are feasible from home too. A good example of a foundational tech initiative is Code.org’s Hour of Code program. It focuses on children and their involvement in computer science and coding and offers lessons for students as young as Kindergarten.

Likewise, President Obama’s K-12 Computer Science for All program is also concentrated on providing students with the computer skills necessary to thrive in today’s job market. Just as learning to read opens countless doors throughout the rest of life, learning coding and other tech basics will serve this generation of K-12 learners well for the rest of their lives.

Cultivate a “learning for learning’s sake” atmosphere.

The climate of our classrooms today is one of strict adherence to a set of benchmarks. If a topic isn’t on a standardized test or in that year’s outlined curriculum, it matters less or not at all. It’s not really the fault of the teachers. Educator accountability, after all, is tied to test results. Whenever possible, though, teachers should look for opportunities for learning that will not be tested later.

Maybe it’s unplanned visits to a school garden or a related lesson that won’t be on any graded or tested materials. Show students that learning is not just about answering test questions later on; sometimes it is just about gaining more knowledge.

Offer accelerated learning.

The job market is evolving rapidly and our education system hasn’t caught up. The weight of large undergraduate student loans means that it isn’t feasible for workers to take 2 to 3 years off to pursue higher education. Accelerated online learning programs that cater to working individuals fit the bill here. Several companies including One Month, Codecademy and General Assembly use varying methods but all aim to address the same issue: getting students on track in a flexible, affordable, and fast way.

New skills, such as computer programming, can be taught online via specialized learning platforms to people on their own time and won’t interfere with their full-time employment. The K-12 community can take a cue from these higher education initiatives: Find ways to offer learning that goes outside the traditional school hours and shows students that learning can happen on a flexible scale.

Becoming a lifelong digital learner truly is invaluable, both personally and professionally. Instilling this trait in our students is important for their own sake, and for ours. The next generation of graduates must value learning simply for its inherent greatness — not just the knowledge that lets us accomplish a simple goal.

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

Why Finding Your Natural Fit Is The Key To Achieving Ecstasis – Chris Myers

1.jpg

After reading Steven Kotler and Jamie Wheal’s excellent “Stealing Fire: How Silicon Valley, the Navy SEALs, and Maverick Scientists Are Revolutionizing the Way We Live and Work,” I’ve been diving deeper and deeper into the concept of ecstasis, commonly known as flow.

For those that may not be familiar with the concept of ecstasis, it’s a elusive state of mind where a person become so engrossed in the task at hand that everything else simply melts away. As external distractions are eliminated, people find that their creativity and actions are guided by intuition, rather than rational thought.

Ecstasis is something that many high-performing artists, athletes, and academics draw upon when they’re in the zone, so to speak. It’s a magic state where your consciousness reaches another plane and creativity flows unimpeded.

Ecstasis is a drug in many respects, albeit a natural one that results from the release of various neurochemicals in the brain.

People are going to great lengths to experience ecstasis in their own lives, trying everything from transcendental meditation to microdosing mind-altering drugs.

Of course, for most of us, these extreme measures are neither feasible nor attractive. I believe that there is an important holistic solution that makes finding your flow state easier. I’m talking of course about fit.

In the world of business, poor performance and existential frustration occurs when an individual’s natural skills and proclivities are simply not a fit for the career they chose or the tasks they take on. That’s why I believe that finding the right fit, both in terms of natural skills and interest, is the most important factor when it comes to success.

2.jpg

This grounded vision of flow was popularized by Hungarian psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi in the early 1990s. According to Csikszentmihalyi, this toned-down version of ecstasis/flow manifests itself when a person’s natural skills align with the challenges they face in a given situation.

When people operate outside of their flow, problems arise.  For example, if an individual works in a highly challenging environment in which their natural skills are outclassed, they tend to experience terrible anxiety and stress.

Conversely, if an individual’s advanced skills are wasted in an industry that is neither interesting nor challenging, boredom and apathy quickly set in.

Finding your personal flow in the context of work isn’t easy. Fortunately, there are a few key lessons I’ve learned over the years that can help you find your place in the workplace and avoid a life of quiet desperation.

Be honest about your strengths and weaknesses   

I began my career in consulting, because that’s what young business school graduates do. I wanted to do something more creative and entrepreneurial, but I was afraid to take on the risk at the time.

These were tough years for me, because no matter how hard I worked it just didn’t feel right. I tried so hard to conform to the ideal of what a hot shot consultant should be, even though I knew that wasn’t who I was. As a result, I was constantly anxious about my performance relative to my peers and stressed out over everything.

It was only when I took the time to be honest about who I really was that things started to improve. I grew to understand that my natural strengths were found at the intersection of finance and the humanities instead of analytics.

Once I began to see myself as someone with the soul of an artist trapped inside of a finance guy’s body, things started to make sense.  I realized that I’d never be successful or happy as a consultant and that my ideal state of flow would be found elsewhere.

This ultimately sent me down the path of entrepreneurship and ultimately led to the founding of my company, BodeTree.

Don’t let yourself get too comfortable

Now, the thing about financial consulting is that it generally pays pretty well. The personal comfort that came along with the job that I hated was the one thing that gave me pause when it came time to quit. I found that I could put up with a lot of short-term pain as long as I was well compensated.

Of course, this was an utterly miserable way to live my life, but I’d be lying if I said that money wasn’t a consideration. Ultimately, my desire to make a dent in the universe outweighed my desire for a comfortable lifestyle, but that isn’t the case for everyone.

For too many, the allure of comfort and the fear of financial hardship prevents them from ever making a positive change. My advice is to avoid getting too comfortable in a career that you know isn’t right for you.

Once you pass the metaphorical point of no return, you’ve committed yourself to a path that is both stifling and unfulfilling.

Learn to take risks

I’ll never forget the day I told my wife that I wanted to quit my well-paying job and start a company called BodeTree. She was months away from giving birth to our first child and here I was, proposing to eliminate any semblance of stability we had in our lives.

Still, despite the risks we both knew it was the right thing to do, and she gave me her full support. I was lucky in that when the opportunity for me to find my flow presented itself, I had the ability and support to take advantage of it.

Many people aren’t able to make that sort of a jump, and as a result, miss out on opportunities when they present themselves.

Fit leads to flow, and flow leads to ecstasis

Life is messy, difficult, and complicated. Nothing ever comes easy, and timing is rarely on your side. If you find yourself waiting for the perfect time or circumstances to make a change, you’ll never be able to move forward.

You have to get comfortable taking risks, both big and small if you want to find your perfect state of flow. This can be both scary and difficult, but risk and reward go hand in hand.

By putting yourself in the right mindset and aligning your skills with your endeavors, you make it easier to achieve the elusive flow state. It may not be as sexy or exciting as mastering transcendental meditation or experimenting with mind-altering drugs, but it just might prove to be a more sustainable path to achieving ecstasis.

If everyone who reads our articles and likes it, helps fund it, our future would be much more secure by your donations – Thank you.

How to Channel Your Skills and Find Your Best Side Hustle – Ryan Robinson

side hustle

First things first, let’s define exactly what a side hustle is. To put it simply, a side hustle is a business that you grow while keeping your day job, thus retaining the stability of income that a full-time gig affords you, as you test the waters of entrepreneurship.

Having a side hustle gives you security, reassurance, diversity of income, and most importantly, it gives you the possibility for something more than just the mindless 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Since a side hustle is really a business at it’s core, I’m going to argue that a business is nothing more than a format for channeling your skills, experiences, abilities and interests into a neat little package that helps people accomplish something meaningful.

When thinking about what it means to start a business, it’s easy to let your mind race around all of the to-do list items like writing a business plan, filing for an LLC, setting up your website, getting a logo designed, making business cards, optimizing your Facebook page, the list goes on and on.

But here’s the truth: None of these tasks matter at all today.

Especially as you’re still looking for the right side hustle idea for you and trying to determine the best way to go about getting started.

A business needs to be incredibly simple in the early days.

No fully baked products, fancy websites, email marketing tools, hi-tech automation systems or Facebook Ad campaigns. When you’re looking for the right idea (and just getting started), any moment spent not directly helping people is a waste of your time.

Let’s take a look at three key ways to go about finding the right side hustle for you, and how you can channel those skills, experiences and interests of yours into a vehicle for helping people accomplish something meaningful.

Observe what you already do at work

What’s your job title at work?

Regardless of your exact title and the daily responsibilities on your plate, chances are high that there’s a market for freelancers and consultants in this type of role.

Freelancing is simple, and it’s one of the best side hustles you can start doing today—as long as you have the right level of motivation and a willingness to deal with rejection. Freelancing is nothing more than taking the skills you already have (or are actively building) and pitching them to companies or individuals who could use your skills in their business, on a contract basis.

Just about any somewhat established company with at least a few employees is going to be receptive to hiring an external freelancer or consultant that demonstrates the ability to provide enough value. Many companies hire freelancers simply because they don’t want to hire full-time for the role, can’t afford to or want to test the waters with someone on a contract basis.

So, ask yourself what you do for work at your day job.

  • Do you spend any time copywriting? Putting together blog posts? Creating proposals or presentations? Well, you could very easily make a run at freelance writing.
  • The same goes if you’re a web developer or software engineer. Offer your freelance services on a project or hourly basis to companies that need tech help, but can’t justify another full-time hire.
  • Designers, marketers, photographers, salespeople—all of these types of jobs have given you the opportunity to build your skills, and there’s high demand for good freelancers in all of these fields.

Getting started with freelancing is extremely easy.

Begin by digging deep into your existing network first, rather than immediately rushing to the freelance marketplace websites like Upwork, Freelancer or Fiverr, where you’re likely to be treated as a commodity. Instead, identify friends, family, former co-workers, classmates and teachers that either have worked with or currently work at cool companies you could see yourself freelancing for.

Touch base with the people in your network, not with a hidden agenda that you need to immediately land a freelance gig with them, but just to let them know you’re now taking on freelance projects.

Organize your best work into a very simple portfolio site using a platform like SquareSpace. Something that can show your prospective clients the type of work you’ll be able to deliver for them.

Examine the problems you’re good at solving

If you’ve been able to solve a meaningful problem for yourself in a repeatable manner, there’s all but guaranteed to be an existing market of people (or businesses) who will pay for quicker, more effective access to that solution.

You can offer the solution as a freelancing service. Or under the right circumstances, you can package what your service does into a physical product that replicates the solution, or even digital products that do the same. You can also get into creating educational resources that train others how to get up to speed, so they’re able to solve their own challenges.

Start by asking yourself these questions to examine whether or not there’s a market for solutions to the problems you’re good at solving.

  • Are there any particular problems or topic areas that people tend to come to you asking for advice and assistance with?
  • Are you seen as a resource or a resident expert at something?
  • Do you find yourself answering the same questions over and over again in the office?
  • Is it easy for you to connect people you know to others who are good potential customers, partners, investors or otherwise?
  • Have you built your own internal tools or processes for doing something quicker?
  • Do you have a coveted skill that seems difficult for others to build and replicate?

If so, this is an opportunity to take something you’re already good at and monetize it into a physical product, service or digital offering that helps people overcome the challenges you’re good at solving.

For example, take the proliferation of product management tools that have been borne out of the need for proper organization, better internal collaboration and faster launching of new projects. These tools are classic examples of taking your personal expertise at doing something, shepherding a new product through to completion, and turning it into a productized, step-by-step system others can follow to achieve similar results.

However, it’s dangerously easy to get attached to your idea, and find yourself spending a lot of money bringing it to life before you’ve truly validated it with paying customers, or by getting pre-orders from people who are willing to pay you for this solution.

Noah Kagan, serial entrepreneur and CEO of Sumo.com, agrees. He shares, “Don’t waste time or spend money on non-core issues when starting a business. In fact, don’t spend any money until you make some.”

This reinforces the business advice that dozens of the world’s top entrepreneurs have shared with meNo matter the type of business, get your customers first.

If you can build a rough, basic version of your solution that works well enough to actually help people achieve their goals (and convince them to pay you before it’s perfect), then that’s when you know you’re really onto something.

Ask yourself what pisses you off most

This is my personal favorite tactic for finding new side hustle ideas, because the focus isn’t necessarily limited to what I’m good at today—or what I’ve identified as a market opportunity.

Instead, the emphasis is on taking a look at the problems, situations, processes, products and services that you feel are subpar and are seriously motivated to improve upon. This is the recipe for discovering a labor of love that you’ll want to pursue.

Here’s an example: I get asked about business ideas and for business advice all the time.

Something that really pisses me off is seeing the friends, family, former-classmates and readers of my blog who ask me for advice, struggle endlessly with trying to validate their ideas and build a business. To address this problem over the past few years, I’ve written extensive guides, created courses, recorded videos and held live webinars, all with the goal of teaching the people I know how to get their first customers. This is something that’s typically been fairly intuitive and relatively easy for me to do. And one of the biggest reasons it’s so difficult for many people, is because they over-complicate the process.

2.jpg

So, I decided to try something radically different. In order to show my community just how easy it can be to validate a business idea if you approach it the right way, I launched a month-long challenge for myself. I asked my readers to vote on a few different options for ideas I’d spend the month trying to validate—and I posted weekly updates sharing progress with exactly what was working and what wasn’t.

By the end of the experiment, I pre-sold a dozen copies of a book that didn’t even exist yet. The sales largely came from friends, mutual connections and people I’d gone to school with who shared an interest in the topic the book was going to be about.

Nothing complex at all. I didn’t build a website, run Facebook ads, spend exorbitant amounts of money, or do anything else that distracted me from just connecting with real people and working with them to come up with a product concept they were interested in. Then, I asked them to pre-order it, and because I’d incorporated much of their personal feedback into the product outline, it was a no-brainer for them to say yes.

Eventually, this public experiment led to hundreds of people commenting on the post and sending me emails, asking for help in replicating this process with their ideas. After consulting for a dozen of these people and helping them get results, I productized this service into an online course that’s now grown to be a large portion of my business.No matter what type of business you want to start, the common denominator of successful entrepreneurs is that their product, service or solution helps people solve a meaningful problem.

And that problem needs to be one that you personally have experience solving, for both yourself and others.

Here’s the beauty about starting as a side hustle: regardless of where you’re at, you can start today. You don’t need to be the world’s foremost expert on your subject in order to charge for your services. To ask people to pre-order your product. To get someone on board for your coaching program that might eventually evolve into a course.

All you really need is the courage to start today. To continue your journey of becoming an expert at your craft. To use your skills to help others, chase your interests, do something, take control. Because the one thing you absolutely cannot afford to do is to wait around for the right idea to just magically fall into your lap.

Stephen’s Web ~ How our skills support and shape our career | Learning & Mind & Brain

Source: Stephen’s Web ~ How our skills support and shape our career | Learning & Mind & Brain

Mobile App Builder – How To Use Tech Skills To …


We build well-adapted features for small businesses. As there is no interest to create mobile apps with no effective features, discover how ours will improve the marketing and CRM of local businesses. With this amazing app you will discover how to Emphasize the products and prices of your clients by making information available on their [ ]
http://bit.ly/2qIETHw

Mobile App Builder – How To Use Tech Skills To …


We build well-adapted features for small businesses. As there is no interest to create mobile apps with no effective features, discover how ours will improve the marketing and CRM of local businesses. With this amazing app you will discover how to Emphasize the products and prices of your clients by making information available on their clients mobile,. You want to resell mobile applications to your clients. Would you like to enable them to manage their own application? No problem. We provide an interface in your image, with your design, in your name, on your website. Calling a store is just a touch away. You can integrate the button into your application in one click. Clients will never have to hunt for the store number again. Integrate your store address and enable your clients to find it directly using the mobile application | Online Marketing Tools
http://bit.ly/2r5OsBa

%d bloggers like this:
Skip to toolbar