A Hand Up, Not A Hand Out! To Address Racial And Economic Injustice, Bridge The Skills Gap

There’s a problem with talent in the United States.  Not a lack of it — I would argue the opposite.  The problem is that millions of talented, motivated young people across the country do not have access to the training and job opportunities that could catapult them into the middle class.  

According to the National Skills Coalition, 52% of jobs require education beyond high school — but not a four year college degree.  Yet, only 43% of workers have the skills training needed to fill these roles. Combined with a broken talent ecosystem where nearly all companies compete for entry-level talent on college campuses because they do not know where else to go, the outlook for low-income Americans — and, in particular, Black Americans who are much less likely to have a bachelor’s degree — was grim even before COVID.

For young adults, the pandemic’s long-term impact could be particularly devastating because of a downward trend in college enrollment.  A recent report by Measure of America, A Decade Undone: Youth Disconnection in the Age of Coronavirus, estimates that more than six million young people are now disconnected from school and employment.

Contrary to past recessions, college enrollment rates have dropped significantly due to COVID given the lack of appeal of paying for remote classes and the need to support affected family members, which will have lasting consequences for individuals who never earn a degree.  Historically, less than 13% of people who leave college before graduating ever return.

If we’re going to rebuild the American economy, we will need to invest significantly in alternative pathways to meaningful careers in the coming decade.

One of the most effective pathways is the nonprofit program Year Up, which offers young adults skills training and a guaranteed professional internship — all at no cost to students.  As discussed later, independent evaluations have confirmed its unprecedented impact on earnings for participants.

Since 2000, Year Up has been supplying skilled, motivated talent to hundreds of top companies around the United States.  Year Up’s success over the past two decades in connecting low-income young people of color with careers in finance, IT and other high-growth sectors provides a blueprint for how the country can ensure economic and racial justice for disadvantaged groups through targeted skills training, tangible connections to employment and a working talent ecosystem.

Following the murder of George Floyd, major corporations around the country made promises to create more opportunity for Black Americans and other people of color.  Partnering with organizations like Year Up is a critical component of turning those promises into reality.

I was first introduced to Year Up in 2004.  A friend from Harvard Business School told me to go to Boston and meet with Gerald Chertavian, who had started a new program that sounded interesting.  My wife and I were walking towards the office when suddenly, two young men ran past us, full steam ahead.

When we got to the Year Up lobby, there they were, huffing and puffing.  I asked them: “Why were you running?”  And one of them said, “Well, we’re running to class.  We don’t want to be late.” I was astounded.  These gentlemen were running to learn.  When Gerald walked in to greet us, I immediately told him: “Whatever you’re selling, I’m buying.”

Since that fateful meeting, I helped launch a new Year Up campus in Providence, Rhode Island; I’ve hosted multiple Year Up interns and hired several Year Up graduates at my company, Providence Equity Partners; I’ve served as the Chair of Year Up’s National Board of Directors; and I’ve donated millions to the organization.

As a white man born in a middle-class environment with the opportunity to attend great schools and universities, I know how lucky I am to have had a helping hand every step of the way.  For thousands of young people, ages 18-26, each year, Year Up is that helping hand.

The Year Up program itself is fairly straightforward.  In its one-year core model, students spend the first six months learning in-demand technical and professional skills, followed by a six-month internship at a corporate partner firm.  Companies invest in Year Up for each intern they host (covering more than half of Year Up’s operating costs) and in exchange get access to a steady pipeline of superb talent.

Throughout the year, students earn a financial stipend (with points — and dollars — docked for behavior that could get them in trouble at work like, you guessed it, being late) as well as college credits for their coursework.  They have access to robust wrap-around services, including on-staff social workers who can help them apply for health insurance, secure childcare, find transportation, and address other obstacles.  Each student also has a dedicated coach and a learning community of peers who provide a strong, lifelong support network.

Simple, right?  But making it work, year over year and in a growing number of markets, requires a truly exceptional leadership team at both the national and local level, coordinating with companies to make sure Year Up’s training matches their hiring needs and coordinating with students to make sure they have everything they need to succeed.

And they do succeed, consistently and in amazing ways.  Earlier this year, the research firm Abt Associates published a study looking at Year Up’s impact on earnings four years post-program.  Funded by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) evaluation of Year Up was a randomized-control trial.

The gold standard of research.  In this study, 2,544 young adults, who all met the admissions criteria for Year Up, were randomly assigned to either participate in the program or to serve as the control group, in which case they were directed to other community resources and could not join Year Up.

The results were the most impressive earnings impacts of any workforce development program to date.  Year Up participants earned, on average, $8,000 more per year — a 30-40% increase — than members of the control group in the four years after they attended Year Up.  (A follow-up study will look at even longer-term impacts on earnings in the seven years post-program.)  Now, these are the results for all the young adults assigned to the Year Up group.  Year Up graduates experience even higher wage gains.

In the second half of 2019 and throughout 2020, despite the ongoing ravages of the pandemic, 80% of Year Up alumni were employed within four months of completing the program, earning an average starting salary of $44,000 per year.  Before Year Up, most were working part-time in minimum-wage roles, if they were working at all.

The PACE study also did a cost-benefit analysis of Year Up and confirmed what I have always known: if Year Up was a stock, everyone would want in on it.  The researchers determined that for every $1.00 put into Year Up, society gets back $1.66.  And this was a conservative estimate that assumed companies only get a 50% return on what they pay to sponsor Year Up interns (measuring actual returns to employers was beyond the scope of the study.

So researchers chose a 50% return based on interviews with executives, who cited both financial and social motives for partnering with Year Up).  Now, I’m pretty sure corporate America would not partner with Year Up unless it was clearly good for business.  Year Up interns become Year Up graduates, and Year Up graduates increase retention, engagement, and diversity.

Working with Year Up also helps show customers and investors how companies are working towards advancing economic and racial justice.  That’s why companies like Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Facebook and Salesforce are taking on hundreds of interns each year — because it is a great deal and truly a win-win for all.

The challenge now is taking something that works and making it accessible to millions more individuals around the country.  Scaling is not easy, and I have direct experience with scaling because at Providence Equity Partners, I helped grow the firm from $171 million in assets under management to over $50 billion.  Scaling requires figuring out what is essential and where you can adapt and innovate.  For Year Up, it means figuring out how to impact the economy more broadly and really move the needle on economic mobility by fixing the fragmented talent marketplace.

It means evolving the delivery model and piloting different approaches to see what makes sense, including more technology-enabled solutions and shorter training for those who aren’t able to commit to a full-time, year-long program.

It’s not just about making sure a young adult has the skills and connections to land a great job — that is only the first step.  The end goal?  An integrated ecosystem that quickly connects the right talent with the right employment opportunities.  For example, Year Up is now partnering with local training providers to provide “last-mile” training that will significantly increase the number of young adults entering the job market set up for long-term career success.

Year Up also created a talent placement firm — Year Up Professional Resources (YUPRO) — to connect Year Up graduates and other non-traditional talent with roles across the country that provide social, economic, and career mobility.  At the same time, Year Up is committed to supporting companies in creating more inclusive employment practices, recognizing that there are two sides to the problem — supply and demand.

To increase the demand for non-traditional talent, Year Up’s advisory services branch, Grads of Life, partners with leading corporations to assess their current talent practices, provide guidance and services like frontline manager training, set actionable goals, and educate employers more broadly on how to improve their hiring, retention, and promotion strategies.

Year Up’s work to pave the way for an inclusive, integrated talent ecosystem is inspiring — but no single organization can fix a broken marketplace on its own.  Companies and the federal government need to do their part to address the broader systemic issues that prevent millions of young people from reaching their full potential.

On the corporate side, the biggest step companies can take is to review their job descriptions and see if they’re asking for four-year college degrees when a shorter training program could provide the necessary skills.  By embracing demonstrated skills over credentials, we can create a society of life-long, adaptive learners and provide opportunities to many more people of color — at least six million Black workers without four-year degrees already have the skills to move into higher-wage roles today.

Employers also need to ensure inclusive promotion practices so that Black Americans and other under-represented employees can progress in the company, leading to greater diversity at higher levels.  And finally, CEOs need to do more than push for diversity from the top — middle and frontline managers have to be invested in making it work, and should be held accountable for lack of progress in the recruiting, retention and advancement of diverse talent.

In terms of the federal government, the funding model needs to be updated.  The government currently spends billions of dollars on workforce programs with very little evidence of real, lasting impact.  At the same time, federal grants have often required incredibly specific evaluation protocols that come at a very high administrative cost — potentially as much as or more than the grant itself.  The government should focus on outcomes and funding proven approaches like Year Up.  When a Year Up graduate becomes a taxpayer, then the government should reward success.

The need for programs like Year Up will be greater than ever post-pandemic as more young people without degrees look for jobs paying family-sustaining wages.  Beyond addressing unnecessary degree requirements, companies should establish talent pipelines from non-university sources (nonprofits, community colleges and other local organizations) to sustain inclusive hiring practices.

Policy leaders and philanthropists should take a hard look at what is being funded and why — are your current grantees producing great outcomes?  As we work to ensure a more just economic recovery, business leaders, policy leaders and philanthropists all have an important role to play, and can all have a huge impact on young people, their families, and their communities.

Paul Salem is Chairman of the National Board of Directors of Year Up and has served on the board of Year Up for over 17 years. Mr. Salem is the Chairman of MGM

Source: A Hand Up, Not A Hand Out! To Address Racial And Economic Injustice, Bridge The Skills Gap

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Future Careers Get A Much-Needed Shot In The Arm

Cognizant’s “Jobs of the Future Index” posts a 29% increase as tech-oriented job markets begin to return to normal, notes Robert Brown, a futurist within the company’s Center for the Future of Work. The US labor market is recovering faster than expected, as successful vaccination programs and stimulus dollars generate sweeping impacts throughout the nation.

The $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, together with the full inoculation of 51 million Americans by the close of the first quarter (and at least partial inoculation of more than 50% of the adult population by April’s end), are instilling confidence in both consumers and businesses. The accelerated use of and reliance on digital technology during the pandemic are now being accompanied by long-term investment in a digitally enabled workforce to meet the needs of tomorrow.

Cognizant’s “Jobs of the Future Index (CJoF Index)” tracks demand for 50 digitally enabled jobs of the future identified by Cognizant’s Center for the Future of Work, capturing the quarterly fluctuations in postings for these jobs. In the first quarter of 2021, the growth of the CJoF Index outpaced that of the Burning Glass jobs index by nearly 10%.

The CJoF increased 28.8% from the previous quarter (from an index figure of 1.22 to 1.57). The Burning Glass index posted a quarter-on-quarter increase of 18.9%, rising from 1.45 to 1.72. These are the greatest gains for either index in the past two years, signaling not only a strengthening labor market but also a larger shift from business survival to digital growth and expansion.

Note, however, that growth notwithstanding, digitally enabled job postings remain far below pre-pandemic levels. The CJoF Index posted a severe year-on-year decline of 22.2%, dropping from 2.02 in Q1 2020 (its highest value ever) to 1.57 in Q1 2021. Growth in digitally enabled positions, which broadly represent higher-wage earners and larger investments for employers, signals longer-term economic confidence — which has yet to be fully achieved.

In contrast, the demand for all jobs is on the verge of bouncing back; the Burning Glass index posted a negligible year-on-year decline of 2.8%. That’s because brick-and-mortar jobs have been more susceptible to business restrictions and lockdowns; they’re now seeing a rush of activity as the economy reopens.

A rising tide: Quarterly growth for all CJoF job families

In addition to total job openings, the CJoF Index monitors trends in eight job families: Algorithms, Automation and AI; Customer Experience; Environment; Fitness and Wellness; Healthcare; Legal and Financial Services; Transport; and Work Culture.

In the first quarter, all eight families registered quarter-on-quarter increases, with the most modest growth in Work Culture (14.5%) and Healthcare (18.5%). Over the quarter, Fitness and Wellness (137.8%) and Transport (38.0%) emerged as top-performing jobs families after experiencing the largest declines in Q4 2020.

Measured over the year, seven of eight families posted declines: Work Culture (-27.8%), Algorithms, Automation and AI (-24.3%), Transport (-16.9%), Customer Experience (-15.7%), Legal and Financial Services (-13.1%), Environmental (-2.8%), and Fitness and Wellness (-2.3%) all dropped. Healthcare (12.4%) was the only family in the CJoF Index to register year-on-year growth.

The Fitness and Wellness family posted the sharpest quarterly increase in job postings (+137.8%) thanks to especially strong growth in digitally enabled Caregiver/Personal Care Aide (249.5%) and Home Health Aide (156.5%) postings. These two job categories have experienced much volatility during the pandemic, running countercyclical with expectations for the progression of the virus.

During declines in the number of new COVID-19 cases in Q1 2021, patients underwent long-postponed elective and routine medical procedures, thereby increasing the demand for in-home care.

Also noteworthy was the Transport family, which realized the second-largest increase (38.0%), led by gains in job postings for Aerospace Engineer (47.6%) and Urban/Transportation Planner (42.1%). The most recent federal stimulus package provided a much-needed lifeline to the travel industry, which was hit hard by the pandemic.

Algorithms, Automation and AI, the largest family in the CJoF Index, realized a 28.3% gain over the quarter. Within this family, 15 of the 16 individual job indexes registered quarter-on-quarter growth. However, only five categories showed year-over-year expansion. Unsurprisingly, each of these also saw growth for the quarter in Q1 2021: Robotics Engineer (73.0%), Robotics Technician (50.2%), Chief Information Officer/Director of Information Technology (47.1%), Mechatronics Engineer (45.7%), and Data Scientist (+42.2%).

The pandemic dampened tech hiring despite the increased reliance on digital technologies to facilitate collaboration and interaction among remote workers. But experts predict that tech occupations will recover to their pre-pandemic strength in 2021 as organizations accelerate their adoption of cloud strategies and artificial intelligence (AI) solutions.

Quarterly ups and downs

In Q4 2020, the fastest-growing jobs in the CJoF Index were:

  • Caregiver/Personal Care Aide (+249.5%)
  • Home Health Aide (+156.5%)
  • Solar Engineer (+131.9%)
  • Sustainability Specialist (+126.1%)
  • Genetic Counselor (+123.3%)

Jobs that posted the largest declines for the quarter were:

  • Solar Installer (-22.4%)
  • Alternative Energy Manager (-20.8%)
  • Fashion Designer (-10.4%)
  • Surveillance Officer/Investigator (-4.6%)
  • Career Counselor (-2.1%)

Annual ups and downs

The fastest-growing jobs in the CJoF Index for the year ending with Q1 2021 were:

  • Solar Engineer (+263.3%)
  • Genetic Counselor (+123.3%)
  • Registered Nurse (+81.0%)
  • Solar Installer (+49.1%)
  • Sustainability Specialist (+39.0%)

Jobs that posted the largest declines during this period were:

  • Physician (-60.9%)
  • Career Counselor (-57.2%)
  • Fashion Designer (-42.3%)
  • Health Information Manager/Director (-35.4%)
  • Alternative Energy Manager (-34.5%)

We encourage you to review our overall index on a regular basis, as these COVID-19-driven shocks continue to alter the landscape of jobs of the future — and jobs of the now. Visit our Cognizant Jobs of the Future Index page to see the most up-to-date data and analysis.

Robert Hoyle Brown is a Vice President in Cognizant’s Center for the Future of Work and drives strategy and market outreach for Cognizant’s Business Process Services business unit. He is also a regular contributor to the CFoW blog. Prior to joining Cognizant, he was Managing Vice President of the Business and Applications Services team at Gartner, and as a research analyst, he was a recognized subject matter expert in BPO, cloud services/BPaaS and HR services. Robert also held roles at Hewlett-Packard and G2 Research, a boutique outsourcing research firm in Silicon Valley. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Berkeley and, prior to his graduation, attended the London School of Economics as a Hansard Scholar. He can be reached at Robert.H.Brown@cognizant.com

Source: Future Careers Get A Much-Needed Shot In The Arm

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Career Development Perspectives- Individual versus Organizational Needs

An individual’s personal initiatives that they pursue for their career development are primarily concerned with their personal values, goals, interests, and the path required to fulfill these desires. A degree of control and sense of urgency over a personal career development path can require an individual to pursue additional education or training initiatives to align with their goals.

In relation, John L. Holland’s 6 career anchors categorizes people to be investigative, realistic, artistic, social, enterprising, and conventional, in which the career path will depend on the characteristic that an individual may embody. The more aware an individual is of their personality type, the better alignment of career development and opportunities they may obtain.

The factors that influence an individual to make proper career goal decisions also relies on the environmental factors that are directly affecting them. Decisions are based on varying aspects affecting work-life balance, desires to align career options with their personal values, and the degree of stimulation or growth.

A corporate organization can be sufficient in providing career development opportunities through the Human Resources functions of Training and Development.The primary purpose of Training and Development is to ensure that the strategic planning of the organizational goals will remain adaptable to the demands of a changing environment.

Upon recruiting and hiring employees, an organization’s Human Resource department is responsible for providing clear job descriptions regarding the job tasks at hand required for the role, along with the opportunities of job rotation, transfers, and promotions. Hiring managers are responsible for ensuring that the subordinates are aware of their job tasks, and ensure the flow of communication remains efficient.

In relation, managers are also responsible for nurturing and creating a favorable work environment to work in, to foster the long term learning, development, and talent acquisition of their subordinates. Consequently, the extent to which a manager embraces the delegation of training and developing their employees plays a key factor in the retention and turnover of employees

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References

  • Driver., and Cooper, Michael J., and Ivan T. (1988). International review of industrial and organizational psychology. Los Angeles, CA: University of South California. pp. 245–277. ISBN 0-471-91844-X.
  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp. 2-4. ISBN 9781138786127.
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  • McDonald., and Hite, Kimberly., and Linda (2016). Career development: a human resource development perspective. New York, New York: Oxfordshire, [England]: Routledge. pp. 20. ISBN 9781138786127.
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5 Questions That Impress Hiring Managers

The interview has gone well. You presented your skills effectively and had a good exchange with everyone you met. You even made them laugh. Now, comes the dreaded final question.

Do you have any questions for us?

Well, sure. Were you really truthful about what it’s like to work here? Who’s the biggest office gossip? What am I going to love and/or hate about this company? But those aren’t things you can typically blurt out in an interview.

Instead, you’ll want to use this time to ask some questions that may both impress hiring managers and reveal important information. When you go for your next interview, keep these five questions in your pocket:

Do you see any major changes in the position or workplace in the coming year?

This may be a difficult question to answer in the COVID-19 era, but it may give you insight into what the company is thinking about the future, says Jon Hill, CEO and chairman of the Energists, an executive search and recruiting firm. “Many companies are in a period of transition and uncertainty as the pandemic continues, so it’s smart to get a read on how that might affect you if you’re hired. You don’t want to go in expecting long-term remote work only to find out you’ll be going into the office come summer,” he says. The question also shows you’re thinking long-term and plan to stay with the company through the changes.

What can I do to really “win” at this job?

Who wouldn’t want to hear this question from a candidate? It shows that you want to get a peek behind the curtain at what it takes to succeed at the firm. Interviewee questions such as this give interviewers a look at the candidate’s drive and potential for success, says Jennifer Morehead, CEO of Flex HR, an HR outsourcing firm. “The questions that interviewees ask are often more indicative of their success than their canned answers to questions. I really do think that interviewee questions can really set a candidate apart from the rest,” she says. To put it another way: What will “success” look like in this role?

If you were to leave this company, what would be the reason?

It’s a little bold, but when asked of a potential manager, it’s a powerful question that will reveal two key things, says Microsoft senior security program manager Teddy Phillips. First, it lets you see the interviewer’s future ambitions, and it also gives you insight into whether this person’s ambitions can be met at this company, he says.

“This allows the interviewee to dig on the ‘why’ or ‘why not’ to give them further insight on if this is an environment to grow their career. Hiring managers respect deep questions that make us think and deliver insightful answers,” he says.

What growth opportunities does the organization offer?

Immediately, this question shows the hiring manager that you’re thinking about how you can develop within the company. “Hiring is costly for organizations, so if they hire someone who is just looking for a paycheck until they jump to their next best opportunity, it costs the company time and money. Asking about the future and growth opportunities shows the employer that you are willing to invest in the organization on a longer-term basis,” says career strategist and coach Nancy Spivey. It also lets the hiring manager know that you’re success-driven and goal-oriented.

Is there anything else I can share to put me at the top of your list?

This one-two punch of a question shows that you’re interested in the job and invites the interviewee to ask any lingering questions. “Depending on how the interview is going and depending on how well you’re getting along with the interviewer, I regularly recommend to people to make it known that you love the place and what you’re hearing and would love the job,” says executive and career coach Lauren Cohen. It’s a strong question on which to end the interview.

“The best interview questions serve two functions,” Hill says. First, they give you useful insight into the position’s more demanding aspects and whether you’re qualified to meet those demands. Second, they show the interviewer that you’re already thinking practically about how you’ll perform in the position, an encouraging thing to see from a candidate. When you can ask relevant questions, you can impress the hiring manager and get the information you need to make the best decisions about your next career move.

By:  Gwen Moran

Source: 5 questions that impress hiring managers

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  • Kristof-Brown, Amy L. (September 2000). “Perceived Applicant Fit: Distinguishing Between Recruiters’ Perceptions of Person-Job and Person-Organization Fit”. Personnel Psychology. 53 (3): 643–671. doi:10.1111/j.1744-6570.2000.tb00217.x.
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The Balance Between Your Personal & Work Life Is Simple To Be Successful At Work: Live

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) conducted a study to determine which countries offered their workers the best balance between personal life and work life . The researchers considered a number of factors including average work hours , personal time, and number of working moms. In the end, the Netherlands took first place with a rating of 9.3 out of 10, while several countries in America ended up presenting a very bad rating.

Not being able to balance work and life can put your health at risk. In fact, many studies have shown that people who work long hours and do not have time for themselves have a 33 percent greater chance of having a heart attack, and a 13 percent greater risk of cardiovascular disease. Fortunately, there are many ways to balance your personal and business life to protect your health .

Put into practice the following tips that will change your life:

1. Get rid of unnecessary activities

Many entrepreneurs work longer hours than they should because they are wasting their time on unnecessary or low-value activities. Find out if this is your problem by recording every minute of your time for a few days. Then review what you wrote down and identify the activities that do not add value.

Eliminate distractions like checking social media or taking personal calls while you work. These activities may not take you more than a couple of minutes, but they add up. You should also analyze if you are wasting a lot of time on activities that someone else could do. For example, if you are wasting time going to the supermarket, maybe you could hire someone to do it or order the supermarket at home.

Getting the most out of every minute of the day is essential to find the balance between work and personal life. By cutting back on non-value-added activities like distractions and errands, you can work fewer hours and take care of your health.

2. Schedule social activities on a recurring basis

Studies have shown that having an active social life is important for health. People who isolate themselves from others increase their chances of dying sooner by fifty percent. But making time for social activities can be tricky, especially when you’re trying to grow a business. One way to overcome this is by scheduling recurring social activities with your closest friends.

For example, plan to have one dinner a month with a group of friends. Put this activity on your calendar, and now you can organize your work schedule around dinner, and not the other way around. This strategy is effective because it forces you to make time to disconnect and have fun with your friends. Think of this social activity as a meeting with an important client, something you can’t cancel regardless of how busy you are.

3. Learn healthy ways to cope with stress

Being an entrepreneur is stressful. No matter how many activities you cut off your list or how often you see your friends, you can’t escape stress. Chronic stress has a negative impact on your mind and body, which can lead to dangerous health conditions such as cardiovascular disease or high blood pressure. But this does not mean that living under stress will shorten your life expectancy. The key to finding a balance between work and health is learning to manage stress.

Get into the habit of taking a step back from stressful situations, just for a few moments to calm down and collect your thoughts. For example, let’s say a client sends you an email demanding something almost impossible. If you feel like your heart is racing and your blood is starting to spike everywhere, get up from the computer and take a walk, even through your office. If you can go for a walk, do it to calm the thoughts that were accumulating in your head. Going for a walk, even for a few minutes, reduces stress and brings clarity to the head.

Dr. Michael Galitzer, author and physician, recommends entrepreneurs to practice deep breathing to relieve stress. Put one hand on your stomach and one on your chest. Begin to breathe deeply from the abdomen to fill your lungs with air. As you slowly breathe in and out, focus on how your abdomen rises and falls. This will make you focus on something other than what is causing you stress and it will be easier to calm you down. Inhale for a count of four, hold the breath for another four seconds, and then exhale for a count of four. Using one of these methods to deal with stress can calm your mind so that you are better prepared to handle the situation that stressed you out.

As an entrepreneur, you are most likely not used to putting yourself first. But it is important to understand that doing so does not mean putting your business aside. By following these tips, you can find the perfect balance between your work and your health, and be more successful than ever in the business world.

By: Brendan M. Egan Founder & CEO of Simple SEO Group

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Practical Wisdom – Interesting Ideas

In today’s video, we are going to share with you, tips you can use to achieve a balanced life. Whether it’s your work, family or any other area in your life you need a balance in, these tips should help you achieve them. #Work&Living More Videos: 10 Legit Ways To Make Money And Passive Income Online – How To Make Money Online – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAj0Z… 10 Signs You Were Born To Be Rich – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0gtV… HOW THE RICH HIDE THEIR MONEY AND PAY NO TAX – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXou5… 7 Types Of Income Of An Average Millionaire – How To Become Rich – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPNN_… 10 Steps To Financial Freedom – How To Be Good With Money – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihne3… References: http://bit.ly/2PHFMM8 Music: (Dreams) by Bensound.com Practical Wisdom – Interesting Ideas

The Future Of Jobs And Education

The world of work has been changing for some time, with an end to the idea of jobs for life and the onset of the gig economy. But just as in every other field where digital transformation is ongoing, the events of 2020 have accelerated the pace of this change dramatically.

The International Labor Organization has estimated that almost 300 million jobs are at risk due to the coronavirus pandemic. Of those that are lost, almost 40% will not come back. According to research by the University of Chicago, they will be replaced by automation to get work done more safely and efficiently.

Particularly at risk are so-called “frontline” jobs – customer service, cashiers, retail assistant, and public transport being just a few examples. But no occupation or profession is entirely future proof. Thanks to artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), even tasks previously reserved for highly trained doctors and lawyers – diagnosing illness from medical images, or reviewing legal case history, for example – can now be carried out by machines.

At the same time, the World Economic Forum, in its 2020 Future of Jobs report, finds that 94% of companies in the UK will accelerate the digitization of their operations as a result of the pandemic, and 91% are saying they will provide more flexibility around home or remote working.

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If you’re in education or training now, this creates a dilemma. Forget the old-fashioned concept of a “job for life,” which we all know is dead – but will the skills you’re learning now even still be relevant by the time you graduate?

One thing that’s sure is that we’re moving into an era where education is life-long. With today’s speed of change, there are fewer and fewer careers where you can expect the knowledge you pick up in school or university to see you through to retirement. MORE FOR YOUThese Are The World’s Best Employers 2020The Value Of Resilient LeadershipEmployers Must Act Now To Mitigate The Impacts Of The Pandemic On Women’s Careers

All of this has created a perfect environment for online learning to boom. Rather than moving to a new city and dedicating several years to studying for a degree, it’s becoming increasingly common to simply log in from home and fit education around existing work and family responsibilities.

This fits with the vision of Jeff Maggioncalda, CEO of online learning platform Coursera. Coursera was launched in 2012 by a group of Stanford professors interested in using the internet to widen access to world-class educational content. Today, 76 million learners have taken 4,500 different courses from 150 universities, and the company is at the forefront of the wave of transformation spreading through education.

 “The point I focus on,” he told me during our recent conversation, “is that the people who have the jobs that are going to be automated do not currently have the skills to get the new jobs that are going to be created.”

Without intervention, this could lead to an “everyone loses” scenario, where high levels of unemployment coincide with large numbers of vacancies going unfilled because businesses can’t find people with the necessary skills.

TURN 500$ INTO 2500$ IN ONE WEEK COMPLTELEY LEGITIMATE

The answer here is a rethink of education from the ground up, Maggioncalda says, and it’s an opinion that is widely shared. Another WEF statistic tells us 66% of employers say they are accelerating programs for upskilling employees to work with new technology and data.Models of education will change, too, as the needs of industry change. Coursera is preparing for this by creating new classes of qualification such as its Entry-Level Professional Certificates. Often provided directly by big employers, including Google and Facebook, these impart a grounding in the fundamentals needed to take on an entry-level position in a technical career, with the expectation that the student would go on to continue their education to degree level while working, through online courses, or accelerated on-campus semesters.

“The future of education is going to be much more flexible, modular, and online. Because people will not quit their job to go back to campus for two or three years to get a degree, they can’t afford to be out of the workplace that long and move their families. There’s going to be much more flexible, bite-sized modular certificate programs that add up to degrees, and it’s something people will experience over the course of their working careers,” says Maggioncalda.

All of this ties nicely with the growing requirements that industry has for workers that are able to continuously reskill and upskill to keep pace with technological change. It could lead to an end of the traditional model where our status as students expires as we pass into adulthood and employment.

Rather than simply graduating and waving goodbye to their colleges as they throw their mortarboards skywards, students could end up with life-long relationships with their preferred providers of education, paying a subscription to remain enrolled and able to continue their learning indefinitely.

“Because why wouldn’t the university want to be your lifelong learning partner?” Maggioncalda says.

“As the world changes, you have a community that you’re familiar with, and you can continue to go back and learn – and your degree is kind of never really done – you’re getting micro-credentials and rounding out your portfolio. This creates a great opportunity for higher education.”

Personally, I feel that this all points to an exciting future where barriers to education are broken down, and people are no longer blocked from studying by the fact they also need to hold down a job, or simply because they can’t afford to move away to start a university course.

With remote working increasingly common, factors such as where we happen to grow up, or where we want to settle and raise families, will no longer limit our aspirations for careers and education. This could lead to a “democratization of education,” with lower costs to the learner as employers willingly pick up the tab for those who show they can continually improve their skillsets.

As the world changes, education changes too. Austere school rooms and ivory-tower academia are relics of the last century. While formal qualifications and degrees aren’t likely to vanish any time soon, the way they are delivered in ten years’ time is likely to be vastly different than today, and ideas such as modular, lifelong learning, and entry-level certificates are a good indication of the direction things are heading.

You can watch my conversation with Jeff Maggioncalda in full, where among other topics, we also cover the impact of Covid-19 on building corporate cultures and the implications of the increasingly globalized, remote workforce. Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

Bernard Marr

 Bernard Marr

Bernard Marr is an internationally best-selling author, popular keynote speaker, futurist, and a strategic business & technology advisor to governments and companies. He helps organisations improve their business performance, use data more intelligently, and understand the implications of new technologies such as artificial intelligence, big data, blockchains, and the Internet of Things. Why don’t you connect with Bernard on Twitter (@bernardmarr), LinkedIn (https://uk.linkedin.com/in/bernardmarr) or instagram (bernard.marr)?

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World Economic Forum

The Future of Jobs report maps the jobs and skills of the future, tracking the pace of change. It aims to shed light on the pandemic-related disruptions in 2020, contextualized within a longer history of economic cycles and the expected outlook for technology adoption, jobs and skills in the next five years. Learn more and read the report: wef.ch/futureofjobs2020 The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change. World Economic Forum Website ► http://www.weforum.org/ Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/worldeconomi… YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/wef Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/worldeconom… Twitter ► https://twitter.com/wef LinkedIn ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/worl… TikTok ► https://www.tiktok.com/@worldeconomic… Flipboard ► https://flipboard.com/@WEF#WorldEconomicForum

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