Why The Return To The Office Isn’t Working

Andres is back to the office three days a week, and like many knowledge workers, he’s not happy about it. He says that while he and the other executive assistants at his Boston law firm have been forced back, the attorneys haven’t been following the rules. That’s partly because the rules don’t quite make sense, and people in all types of jobs are only coming in because they have to, not because there’s a good reason to go in.

“People have adapted to remote work, and truthfully, the firm has done a tremendous job at adapting in the pandemic,” said Andres, who would prefer going in two days, as long as others were actually there. “But I think it’s more the returning to work that they’re struggling on.” He, like a number of other office workers, spoke with Recode anonymously to avoid getting in trouble with his employer.

Andres enjoys working from home and thinks he does a good job of it — and it allows him to escape a long commute that has only gotten 45 minutes longer thanks to construction projects on his route.

The majority of Americans don’t work from home, but among those who do, there’s a battle going on about where they’ll work in the future. And it’s not just people who enjoy remote work who are upset about the return to the office.

Those who want to be remote are upset because they enjoyed working from home and don’t understand why, after two years of doing good work there, they have to return to the office. People who couldn’t wait to go back are not finding the same situation they enjoyed before the pandemic, with empty offices and fewer amenities. Those who said they prefer hybrid — 60 percent of office workers — are not always getting the interactions with colleagues they’d hoped for.

The reasons the return to the office isn’t working out are numerous. Bosses and employees have different understandings of what the office is for, and after more than two years of working remotely, everyone has developed their own varied expectations about how best to spend their time. As more and more knowledge workers return to the office, their experience at work — their ability to focus, their stress levels, their level of satisfaction at work — has deteriorated. That’s a liability for their employers, as the rates of job openings and quits are near record highs for professional and business services, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

There are, however, ways to make the return to the office better, but those will require some deep soul-searching about why employers want employees in the office and when they should let it go.

The current situation

For now, many employees are just noticing the hassle of the office, even if they’re going in way less than they did pre-pandemic. This is what’s known as the hybrid model, and even though people like the remote work aspect of it, for many it’s still unclear what the office part of it is for.

“If I go into the office and there are people but none of them are on my team, I don’t gain anything besides a commute,” Mathew, who works at a large payroll company in New Jersey, said. “Instead of sitting at my own desk, I’m sitting at a desk in Roseland.”

Mathew’s company is asking people to come in three days a week, but he says people are mostly showing up two.

Further complicating things is that, while the main reason hybrid workers cite for wanting to go into the office is to see colleagues, they also don’t want to be told when to go in, according to Nicholas Bloom, a Stanford professor who, along with other academics, has been conducting a large, ongoing study of remote workers called WFH Research.

Employees say that management has yet to really penalize people for failing to follow office guidance, likely out of fear of alienating a workforce in a climate where it’s so hard to hire and retain employees. Many others moved farther from the office during the pandemic, making the commute harder. The result is circular: People go into the office to see other people but then don’t actually see those people so they stop going into the office as much.

With 70 percent of office workers globally now back in the office at least one day a week, the excitement many people felt a few months ago is wearing off. For many, that novelty is turning into an existential question: Why are we ever here?

“It was sort of like the first day of school when you’re back from summer vacation and it’s nice to see people and catch up with them,” Brian Lomax, who works at the Department of Transportation in Washington, DC and who is expected to come in two days a week, said. “But now it’s, ‘Oh, hey, good to see you,’ and then you go on about your day,” an experience he says is the same as working from home and reaching out to people via Microsoft Teams.

Most of the people we spoke to use software like Teams, Slack, and Zoom to communicate even while they’re in the office, making the experience similar to home. If one person in a meeting is on a video call from home — say, because they’re immunocompromised, or they have child care duties, or it just happens to be the day they work from home that week — everyone is. There’s actually been an uptick in virtual meetings, despite the return to the office, according to Calendly. In April, 64 percent of meetings set up through the appointment scheduling software included videoconferencing or phone details, compared with 48 percent a year earlier.

One issue is that hybrid means different things from company to company and even team to team. Typically, it seems employers are asking workers to come in a set number of days per week, usually two or three. Some employers are specifying which days; some are doing it by teams; some are leaving it up to individual workers. Almost half of office visits are just once a week — and over a third of these visits are for less than six hours, according to data from workplace occupancy analytics company Basking.io as reported by Bloomberg. The middle of the week tends to be much busier than Mondays and Fridays, when there are empty cubicles as far as the eye can see.

There’s also a disconnect between why employees think they’re being called in. Employees cite their company’s sunk real estate investments, their bosses’ need for control, and their middle managers’ raison d’etre. Employers, meanwhile, think going into the office is good for creativity, innovation, and culture building. Nearly 80 percent of employees think they’ve been just as or more productive than they were before the pandemic, while less than half of leaders think so, according to Microsoft’s Work Trends Index.

Employers and employees generally tend to agree that a good reason to go into the office is to see colleagues face to face and onboard new employees. Data from Time Is Ltd. found that employees that started during the pandemic are collaborating with less than 70 percent of colleagues and clients as their tenured peers would have been at this point. Slack’s Future Forum survey found that while executives were more likely to say people should come into the office full time, they are less likely to do so themselves.

The nature of individuals’ jobs also determines how much, if at all, they think they should be in the office. Melissa, a government policy analyst in DC, is supposed to go in twice a week but has only been going in once because she says her work involves collaborating with others but not usually at the same time. She might write a draft, send it to others to read, and then they’ll make comments and perhaps, at some point, they all get together to talk about it.

“I see a lot of these ads for these teamwork apps — they always show these pictures of people sitting at a conference table and they have paper and all sorts of things on the wall and they’re really collaborating on product development or something,” Melissa said. “And I’m like, that’s not what we’re doing.” Still, she thinks that from managers’ perspectives, in-person is the gold standard, regardless of the actualities of the job.

“It feels like they just want people in the office,” she said.

It also depends on the pace of work. A financing services employee at Wells Fargo in Iowa said he works more efficiently at the office but that since his job consists of working on deals that come in sporadically throughout the day, that efficiency means he ends up wasting a lot of time playing on his phone or pacing around the office in between.

“What makes this so frustrating is that my wife will send me a photo of her and my 10-month-old son going out for a walk,” he said. “If I had a break at home, I’d go on a walk with them.”

Employers are certainly feeling the frustration from their employees and have been walking back how much they’re asking employees to be in the office. Last summer, office workers reported that their employers would allow them to work from home 1.6 days a week; now that’s gone up to 2.3 days, according to WFH Research.

Companies are rolling back return-to-office, or RTO, plans at law firms, insurance agencies, and everywhere in between. Even finance companies like JPMorgan Chase, whose CEO has been especially vocal about asking people to return to their offices, have loosened up.

Tech companies have long been at the forefront when it comes to allowing hybrid or remote work, and now even more tech companies, including Airbnb, Cisco, and Twitter, are joining the club. Even Apple, which has been much stricter than its peers in coaxing employees back to the office, has paused its plan to increase days in the office to three a week, after employee pushback and the resignation of a prominent machine learning engineer.

It seems like, for now, office workers have the upper hand. Many don’t expect to be penalized by management for not working from the office when they’re supposed to, partly because they don’t think management believes in the rules themselves.

“Our retention is better than expected and our employee engagement is better than expected, so I don’t think [our executives are] seeing any downside,” said Rob Carr, who works at an insurance company in Columbus, Ohio, where people are expected to be in three days a week but, as far as he’s seen, rarely go. “Honestly, if they were, I think they’d be cracking down, and they’re not.”

Carr himself goes into the office every day, but only because he and his wife downsized houses and moved a short bike ride from his office. Otherwise Carr, who is on the autism spectrum and says he doesn’t do well with in-person interactions, would be completely happy working from home as he is from his empty office.

“Hats off to Apple for innovation,” Carr said, “but they are, certainly from a Silicon Valley perspective, an old company.”

What to do about the broken return to the office

Solving the office conundrum is not easy, and in all likelihood it will be impossible to make everyone happy. But it’s important to remember that going to the office never really worked for everyone, it was just what everyone did. Now, two years after the pandemic sent office workers to their living rooms, their employers may have a chance to make more people happy than before.

“The problem right now is you’ve set something that’s unrealistic and doesn’t work, and when employees try it out and it doesn’t work, they give up,” Bloom, the Stanford professor, said. “If employees refuse to come in, it means the system isn’t working.”

To fix that, employers should explore not only why they want people in the office, but whether bringing people into the office is achieving those goals. If the main reason to bring people back is to collaborate with colleagues, for example, they need to set terms that ensure that happens. That could mean making people who should be working together come in on the same days — a problem around which a whole cottage industry of remote scheduling software has cropped up.

That said, Bloom believes there’s no golden rule on how often it’s necessary to go in to get the benefits of the office. Importantly, when workers do come in, they shouldn’t be bogged down with anything they could be doing at home.

“First, figure out how many days a week or a month constructively would it be good to have people face to face, and that depends on how much time you spend on activities that are best in person,” he said, referring to things like onboarding, training, and socializing.

Employers need to be realistic about how much in-person work really needs to happen. Rather than making people come in a few times a week at random, where colleagues pass like ships in the night, they could all come in on the same day of the week or even once a month or quarter. And on those days, the perks of coming in have to be more than tacos and T-shirts, too. While fun, free food and swag aren’t actually good reasons to go to the office.

How much someone needs to come into the office might also vary by team or job type.

“For me, coming in to do teaching and to go to research seminars, that might be twice a week,” Bloom said. “But for other people, like coders, it may just be a big coding meeting and a few trainings once a month. For people in marketing and advertising, mad men, that’s very much around meetings, discussions, problem-solving — that may be two or three days.”

Another thing to consider, especially for those who truly like the office, is how they can get that experience with fewer of the downsides.

Currently, even employees who still like their offices a lot aren’t necessarily using them. Real estate services company JLL found that a third of office workers are using so-called “third places” like cafes and coworking spaces to work, even when they have offices they can go to.

Matt Burkhard, who leads a team of 30 at Flatiron Health, is one of those workers. He says he works better at an office than at home, where he has two young children. And while Burkhard enjoys going into his office and goes there once or twice per week, though he won’t be required to do so until later this summer, the trip to Manhattan isn’t always feasible, especially if he has to do child care for part of the day. So he’s been going to Daybase, a coworking space near his home in Hoboken, NJ, three or four times per week.

“I’m just a lot more focused when everyone is in the same place working,” Burkhard said, noting that he hasn’t asked his company to pay for the $50 a month membership fee.

For many office workers, the current state of affairs just isn’t working out. So they’re doing what they can to make their experience of work better, whether that means renting coworking space or not showing up for arbitrary in-office days. They don’t necessarily hate the office. What they hate is not having a good reason to be there.

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Performance Management vs Disciplinary Action: The Differences Explained

Many employers find performance management, or instigating disciplinary action against employees for misconduct, difficult and emotionally challenging. It can be hard for an employer to distinguish between misconduct and underperformance; it’s harder still managing an employee through either a disciplinary or a performance management process with confidence.

If you are required to take management action, to help you gain confidence in your processes which in turn may help you to build a better business, we have set out some differences between performance management and disciplinary action below.

What is Disciplinary Action?

If an employee is behaving improperly in the workplace, an employer may need to raise and address concerns regarding the employee’s conduct by means of a formal disciplinary process.

Employers should introduce and implement policies and procedures in line with the expected standards of behaviour in the workplace, so employees know what is considered acceptable conduct. These policies should be made available to all employees and the employer should be consistent in applying and enforcing these policies.

Disciplinary action is usually taken to address misconduct, which is defined as behaviour in the workplace which is generally unacceptable, or contrary to the employment contract, or breaches policies and procedures of a company.

What Are Some Examples of Misconduct?

Misconduct is behaviour that is considered unacceptable and inconsistent with employee obligations or duties, i.e., a breach of company policy or procedure.

Examples include:

  • unauthorised absences (including ‘sickies’)
  • lateness
  • bad language
  • poor presentation
  • misuse of company equipment

Serious Misconduct

Serious misconduct is defined as wilful and deliberate behaviour that is inconsistent with the continuation of the employment contract or causes serious and imminent risk to the reputation, viability or profitability of the business, or health and safety of a person. Examples includes theft, fraud, and assault.

Provided a fair process is followed, serious misconduct may give an employer grounds for instant, or summary, dismissal which means the employee is not provided with notice, or payment of notice in lieu.

Employsure is here for business owners and are committed to giving every business free initial advice. If this is a topic of concern and you need to get more from your staff, call us on 1300 207 182.

Appropriate Standards of Behaviour

It needs to be noted that not all misconduct is clear and obvious. For example, getting into a fight at work is clearly and obviously inappropriate behaviour in any workplace, however, expected behaviour when using company equipment may vary from business to business. It’s important to ensure that you’ve implemented – and consistently applied – a thorough code of conduct or standards of behaviour policy in your workplace in case an employee disputes an allegation of misconduct.

What is Performance Management?

Performance management is used to address poor performance. Poor performance is where an employee is not meeting the essential requirements of their role. If an employee is underperforming – for example failing to hit KPIs or unable to meet their remit due to lack of skills an employer may consider entering the employee into a performance management process.

As part of a fair process, the employer should identify the issue e.g., where skills are lacking, inform the employee and provide further training where appropriate. The employer should put in place a plan of action to address the performance issues and to give the employee an opportunity to improve to the required standard. Performance management should only address the requirements of the role, not behaviour in the workplace; it should be clear that misconduct is not poor performance.

While part of the performance management process is similar to disciplinary procedures, it is important for employers to not conflate the two concepts. If you’d like to know more about performance management, download Employsure’s free guide. For a more confidential chat, call Employsure’s Employer Helpline for free initial advice: 1300 207 182.

What’s the Difference?

A performance management process may result in further training or a performance management plan (PMP), or performance improvement plan (PIP), an opportunity to improve their performance.

A disciplinary procedure may not result in a behavioral management plan as it is not an employer’s responsibility to ensure their employees act reasonably and appropriately in the workplace. An employer’s duty is only to remind them of their expected behaviour in the workplace and ensure they abide by it.

By : Employsure

Source: Performance Management vs Disciplinary Action: The Differences Explained – Dynamic Business

Further contents:

Twitter Will Add Warning Label to Tweets it Deems ‘Viral Misinformation’

Twitter recently announced its new “crisis misinformation policy” which will seek to suppress posts the company deems “viral misinformation.” The update will allow Twitter employees to label, and censor posts they determine to be misleading or false. The company claimed that the new tools will only be used in the case of a “humanitarian crisis.”

“Today, we’re introducing our crisis misinformation policy – a global policy that will guide our efforts to elevate credible, authoritative information, and will help to ensure viral misinformation isn’t amplified or recommended by us during crises,” Twitter wrote in a blog post Thursday. “In times of crisis, misleading information can undermine public trust and cause further harm to already vulnerable communities.”

Twitter went on to define such crises as “situations in which there is a widespread threat to life, physical safety, health, or basic subsistence.”“This definition is consistent with the United Nations’ definition of a humanitarian crisis and other humanitarian assessments,” the company added.Hoax tweets and other misinformation regularly go viral during emergencies, as users rush to share unverified information. The sheer speed of events makes it difficult to implement normal verification or fact-checking systems, creating a significant challenge for moderators.

As part of its new “misinformation policy”, Twitter will employ a variety of tools, including the removal tweets from recommendations and disabling engagement on “misleading” posts. In addition to a label, users will not be able to like, retweet or reply to flagged tweets.“To reduce potential harm, as soon as we have evidence that a claim may be misleading, we won’t amplify or recommend content that is covered by this policy across Twitter – including in the Home timeline, Search, and Explore,” Twitter explained.

“In addition, we will prioritize adding warning notices to highly visible Tweets and Tweets from high profile accounts, such as state-affiliated media accounts, verified, official government accounts.”Under the new policy, tweets classified as misinformation will not necessarily be deleted or banned; instead, Twitter will add a warning label requiring users to click a button before the tweet can be displayed (similar to the existing labels for explicit imagery).

The tweets will also be blocked from algorithmic promotion.The stronger standards are meant to be limited to specific events. Twitter will initially apply the policy to content concerning the ongoing Russian invasion of Ukraine, but the company expects to apply the rules to all emerging crises going forward.

For the purposes of the policy, crisis is defined as “situations in which there is a widespread threat to life, physical safety, health, or basic subsistence.”The policy comes at a delicate time for Twitter, with the company’s approved sale to Elon Musk in a confusing limbo.

Musk has pledged to scale back moderation systems at the company in favor of a maximalist view of free speech. But with Musk claiming the deal is on hold pending a bot investigation, it’s unclear when or how his ideas will be implemented.The social media giant infamously flagged the New York Post’s bombshell Hunter Biden laptop story just weeks before the election.In order to suppress the story — which included emails, text messages, photos and financial documents detailing foreign business dealings of the Biden family — Twitter cited its “hacked materials” policy. This policy, like many sections of Twitter’s terms of service, has been applied selectively on numerous occasions.

In a recent example, an illegally obtained list of donations to Canada’s Freedom Convoy protesters was allowed to be freely shared on the platform. The list included names, addresses and phone numbers of anyone who donated as little as $25 to the protest movement. Despite the fact that the information was obtained through a hack, Twitter took no action.Many believe Twitter’s “crisis misinformation policy” will be yet another policy that is selectively applied to conservatives.

This would give the San Francisco-based platform even more power to meddle in election outcomes, as they did in 2020. A poll conducted by The Post Millennial this past March found that 16% of Biden voters would not have voted for him if they were aware of the laptop scandal.

Source: Twitter Will Add Warning Label to Tweets it Deems ‘Viral Misinformation’

More contents:

How to Create an Internal Company Newsletter

When you’ve got news to share with your employees, team, or executives, an internal company newsletter can be the most effective way of reaching everyone. An internal newsletter could contain an update about the upcoming holiday party for the entire organization or information around the company’s quarterly results for the executive team exclusively.

And, you could have both! There are many different ways to use internal company newsletters, and you can have more than one for different teams, offices, or departments. The approach you take depends on the objectives of your marketing strategy.

We’ll explore internal newsletter examples a bit further down, but before we dive into the concept of internal company newsletters, let’s briefly answer the following question: What is a newsletter?

What Is a Newsletter?

To put it simply: A newsletter is either an electronic or printed report covering various activities of a company or business. It is sent to its customers, community members, or other subscribers and consists of interesting content, promotions, announcements. A newsletter helps to increase traffic and serves as an information source.

What Is an Internal Newsletter?

Just like a normal newsletter, an internal newsletter is an electronic or printed report sent out on a regular basis to update subscribers. For internal newsletters these subscribers are internal stakeholders such as employees, shareholders, the board, management, different departments, etc.

Oftentimes, organizations have an external-facing newsletter but lack any type of internal company newsletters. And that’s the problem we are trying to solve with this blog (and our newsletter management platform). One reason why organizations forgo putting together these weekly, monthly, or quarterly email updates is that there’s a myth that they aren’t read by employees, however, the data shows otherwise.

What Is the Purpose of an Internal Company Newsletter?

Besides being a way to inform employees about the latest company updates, an employee newsletter can also be a fun way of sharing, explaining, and reinforcing your company culture.

At first, a company newsletter may seem insignificant in the day-to-day operations of a company, but it does play a role in shaping the workplace environment.

Some argue internal company newsletters are time-consuming and don’t offer enough ROI. Well, we have some stats that say differently. According to Retrospectively, Inc., employee productivity increases anywhere from 20-25% when employees feel connected to the company.

However, only 13% of employees reported participating in their intranet daily—31% said they never do.

So, although most PR & Communication teams are focused on getting the word out there, it’s just as important for these teams to spread the word internally — often they also involve the HR department to provide additional internal newsletter ideas. A company newsletter (corporate newsletter) is a critical part of your email marketing strategy that can help keep employee engagement and communication levels high.

When embarking on an employee newsletter strategy, remember that the values you want your company to reflect should be the values underlying your internal newsletter content. In this blog, we will cover internal newsletter ideas, internal newsletter names, company newsletter examples, and templates to use for your internal employee newsletter, so when you’re done reading, you’ll be a pro.

14 Internal Newsletter Ideas

  1. Share Your Company’s Successes: Make sure everyone knows what the PR and marketing teams are up to. In your internal company newsletter, you want to share your wins, notify people about your latest content, and get everyone in sync on your company’s top messages so that they can communicate and increase your reach.Want to make things easy? Our internal newsletter template which is part of our media intelligence suite will allow you to curate a hand-selected feed of articles to be shared via a branded email newsletter.
  2. Promote Social Advocacy: You spend a lot of time on creating social media content—but chances are your co-workers and employees aren’t all following your branded social media profiles. An internal company newsletter can help spread your social message and make sure everyone is aware and motivated to help communicate and promote it. Plus, if you run out of ideas of what to include in a company newsletter, add a few examples of people mentioning you on social media, it may incentivize others to start creating similar UGC. Let them be your brand’s #1 fans.
  3. Share What’s Going on in the Competitive Landscape: Use an employee newsletter as an opportunity to cover industry news, trends, and insights. No matter how innovative a company is, competitors are a healthy part of any industry. That’s why highlighting the achievements, as well as the missteps of close competitors, can give colleagues insight into how to do their jobs. Using a media monitoring solution, you can benchmark how well you’re doing in comparison to your top competitors. By sharing these metrics, news alerts, or industry updates, you’re giving colleagues insights that can inform future campaigns or sales pitches.
  4. Boost Your Branding: A company newsletter can help you reinforce brand voice, style, imagery, and personality. Are you seeing fellow employees misrepresenting the brand? Quick do’s and don’ts can go a long way in keeping employees on their toes. Plus, linking out to your style guide and templates.
  5. Highlight Evergreen Content: The internal comms and content marketing team are creating great content. And your sales team could use the blogs, webinars, or case stories as a great excuse for touching base with key prospects…if only they knew about it. Use your corporate newsletter to encourage them to communicate about the thought leadership you’ve worked so hard on.
  6. Bring in the Voice of Your Customers: Highlight customer case studies and bring in suggestions for new ones. Case studies are a great sales tool, and an internal company newsletter can highlight new and relevant clients that are using your product or services. You could also include any comments or reviews left by customers that you think your employees should know about. There’s no better advocate for the brand than happy customers!
  7. Complement Existing Company Collateral and Resources: Your email employee newsletter can be a weekly, monthly, or quarterly examination of what the company finds important. It can be a platform to welcome new employees, announce new product versions, highlight relevant assets, and ask for input on a rebranding. In this way, it reinforces the messages and information in all the other content that your company produces. Use it to collect feedback and insights.
  8. Employee Engagement and Advocacy: Communication is key. Turn a colleague into a hero. Calling out successful collaboration helps those involved feel appreciated and encourages more sharing of ideas and resources, which boosts employee engagement.
  9. Reinforce Transparency As a Mindset: Having a company newsletter opens up a line of communication that doesn’t clog up the email inbox. As comms pros, we know that the best way to start a conversation is to provide the subject and the platform. At the very least, this newsletter can be the jumping-off point to discuss company values and employee culture.
  10. Share News Updates:  If you introduce a newsletter right with a predictable cadence, it can be an invaluable mouthpiece for stakeholders throughout the organization. The resulting content can be a 360-degree view of what is going on in an organization. The material can be as diverse as a recap of the CEO’s recent “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) session; the sales team’s exceeding their monthly sales quotas; issues with a recent product launch, communication from a Vice-President, or highlights from the social media team.
  11. Provide the Data Analytics Behind the Successes of Your Efforts: Data is how a segment of your colleagues track success, so in addition to sharing media coverage, you can share easy to read graphs and charts that track monthly media coverage, social media mentions, sentiment, competitive benchmarks, etc…. It’s an easy way to benchmark the work you do for those more interested in volume than they are the engagement aspect of KPIs.
  12. Earned Media Coverage: If you receive hard-earned coverage in a media outlet, whether it’s the Washington Post or a niche publication that’s important to your industry, wouldn’t you want to shout it from the mountaintop? Well, here’s the perfect venue for doing just that. Tag the story in your media monitoring platform and create a company newsletter using the built-in functionality, don’t forget to include additional insight. Your brand mentions mean as much to your colleagues as they do to you, so share that article that has a link to your product, quotes your CEO about the state of your industry, or shows how your company is making strides with its offerings. Your colleagues want to know how the rest of the world perceives the company. And as a bonus, summarize your coverage analytics to show how your reach and share of voice have grown, so they can take pride in the momentum you’ve built.
  13. Include Industry News, Trends, and Insights: No matter how innovative a company is, competitors are a healthy part of any industry. That’s why highlighting the achievements, as well as the missteps of close competitors in the form of an internal company newsletter, can give employees insight into how to do their jobs. With a media monitoring solution in place, a company can monitor their own, as well as competitors’ keywords to see how well their social media accounts are leading to engagement. From this info, they can perform a competitive analysis to share with the entire organization.
  14. Highlight Key Partners and Customers: Use the employee newsletter as an opportunity to highlight key partners and customers and what their public media coverage is. The newsletter can show how your key partners and customers are using your products and services in interesting ways. This can be useful for sales, biz dev, and customer service teams as they reach out to new partners or assist existing partners and clients. It can also help UX/CX and engineering teams as they understand how products and services are actually used by partners and clients.

Best Internal Company Newsletters [Examples]

Now that we know what to put in a company newsletter, let’s take a look at an example for some inspiration. We took an informative and concept-driven approach and mocked it up below. This internal newsletter comes directly from the marketing team to highlight their accomplishments, upcoming events, resources, and more.Screenshot of the internal newsletter of Meltwater as part of the best internal newsletter examples and the best internal newsletter templates for your company

But what is the best format for a newsletter?

An internal company newsletter truly is just another email in our inbox, right? So the design element is crucial to whether your readers are encouraged to click through or not. And today, you can use our internal newsletter template or customize your own using a service like Meltwater.

Here are some more internal newsletter templates and concrete internal newsletter examples we think are k-i-l-l-i-n-g it that are worth checking out.

Internal Newsletter Example #1:

Meltwater’s newsletters & website newsfeeds allow you to easily share media coverage in a customized fashion, that way, you can:

  • Share results & inform stakeholders—The employee newsletter will allow you to curate a hand-selected feed of articles to be shared via a branded email newsletter & the newsfeed product allows you to showcase positive news or social media content on your website, adding third-party validation to your own content.
  • Promote your hard work—Use the company newsletters to share company mentions, provide commentary on important stories, and compile market and competitor briefs.
  • Showcase news and social mentions—Promote relevant news and any social media mentions. The newsfeed allows you to stream customer testimonials and feature industry insights.

Meltwater newsletter options

Meltwater offers a couple of ways to build newsletters. Your team can either cherry-pick the content featured, or you can lean on Meltwater’s analyst team to do so on your behalf.

Not sure which option to go for? If newsletters are new to your organization and you don’t receive a huge amount of media coverage, we’d recommend having your team curate the content in the first instance. If you work for a large brand, the process of finding and sharing business-critical media can take up a lot of your internal time and resources and so Meltwater’s Curated Media Briefings may be a better option since our team of analysts do the heavy lifting for you.

Benefits of Meltwater’s Curated Media Briefings:

  1. We make sure that the dedicated Meltwater analyst we assign to your company understands your industry and competitive landscape so they can proactively monitor trends, market disruptions and new competitive threats, and alert you to the conversations you need to
    be aware of.
  2. Analysts help eliminate irrelevant mentions by manually reviewing all content and selecting critical business insights based on your brief.
  3. Briefings are highly customizable. We understand that different recipient groups are interested in different topics, such as sales, product reviews, negative news, mergers and acquisitions etc. If your priorities change, we’ll pivot with you and update all searches, while offering agility and flexibility to adjust scope.
  4. Meltwater analysts enrich curated briefings, transforming them into insights that are quick to read and easy to understand. We include publication, headline, date, content link, and options for an executive summary and/or customised article summaries highlighting key takeaways. That way, you can stay informed, gain a 360-view of your business, and educate your colleagues on the industry trends they need to know about.Photo of a woman working in the Meltwater Media Intelligence Platform using the internal newsletter functionality

Internal Newsletter Example #2: Themezy

Themezy employee internal newsletter templates are great because they are optimized across devices to ensure everyone can easily read the newsletter. What’s even better is they offer sixteen free company newsletter templates and you don’t have to submit your email address to get started. Screenshot of the Themezy internal newsletter template library as inspiration for the best internal newsletter examples and the best internal newsletter templates for your company

Internal Newsletter Example #3: TemplateMonster

If you have some budget to spend, look to TemplateMonster. They have a variety of internal newsletter templates that are user-friendly, customizable, and compatible. You can even do a live demo to see if it fits your needs. Below is their Panda employee newsletter template, built specifically for a creative agency.Screenshot of the Panda employee newsletter template by TemplateMonster as part of the best internal newsletter examples and the best internal newsletter templates for your company

Internal Newsletter Example #4: HubSpot Template Marketplace

With a large collection of email company newsletter templates, HubSpot offers free and paid versions, some as low as $1 and can be used immediately. Below are all examples of newsletter templates from their marketplace.Screenhsot of the HubSpot Template Marketplace as part of the best internal newsletter examples and the best internal newsletter templates for your company

Internal Newsletter Names: How to Choose The Best Option

Brainstorming names can be tricky, right? And there are so many options of possible internal newsletter names. As marketers, we know It’s one of the first things your employees will read next to the subject line, so it’s important to be thoughtful. And you want to make sure it stands out and grabs the reader’s attention. So where do you start?

First, take into consideration what type of content is included. Is its purpose informative, frequency-driven, goal-driven, or employee-driven? Is it based on a concept or your brand’s name?

Maybe it’s a mix? Second, make sure the employee newsletter name reflects your company’s brand voice and adheres to any internal guidelines. You can reference your company’s brand guidelines as a good place to start. And third, keep it short, simple, and direct.

Here are some examples of internal newsletter names based on the intention or theme of your internal newsletter.

Informative

  • The Insider
  • [Company Name] Digest
  • Just the Facts

Frequency-driven

  • The Monthly Review
  • The [Company Name] Weekly Bulletin
  • The Month Ahead

Employee-driven

  • The People’s News
  • Our Voices
  • All Hands Information

 Concept-driven

  • Marketing Insider
  • Media Talk
  • Marketing Thoughts

Brand-driven

Consider how you can use your brand in the publication name. It could be the title of your blog, tied to your brand colors, or an alliteration based on your company’s name.

Improve Internal Communications with Employee Engagement!

Employee advocacy is key in building and protecting brand reputation, so it makes sense to cultivate a strong employee culture. And an internal newsletter is a key component of a strong employee brand ambassador program and improving internal communications. Now that newsletters are easier than ever to produce, “why not start a company newsletter today?

By: Allison Smith

Source: How to Create an Internal Company Newsletter?

.

More contents:

AI And The Secret To Employee Happiness

When I started working as a mainframe operator in IT in 1988, I felt like I was part of a secret club. None of my family understood what I was doing; my friends would ask, “what’s a mainframe and why do you have to work nights?”

My onboarding took months, and a typical workday began with staring at a blank screen. Since mainframes didn’t come with a mouse, I would enter memorized commands like “=3.4” and “Sys3.AF*” to navigate the data sets I needed to find.I don’t think many workers today would put up with that.

Any manager who has tried to hire an employee today will agree the war for talent is real. Job perks like free lunches and on-site laundry just don’t cut it anymore. To recruit talent today, there’s really one thing that every enterprise needs to do: Make work better.

Make work easy

I’ve found that companies invest in digital transformation for three reasons: To work faster, to work more efficiently, and to change or expand their business models. But the end result of any digital transformation should be a better experience, and leaders often neglect the everyday experience of the workers who actually achieve these goals.

Consider this. Outside of work, most people have grown used to finding a new home, getting pet care, and organizing travel all with just a swipe of their finger on the touchscreen. They expect the same level of ease when it comes to the technologies they use at work. It’s no coincidence that the latest release of the Now Platform invested so heavily in improving user experience.

Sure, the interface looks beautiful. But the experience goes deeper than the surface by making the usage more intuitive. Good user experience is about simplifying and hiding complexity so that using it comes naturally to anyone. Make work easy.

Flex on flexibility

Many workplaces have returned to on-site or hybrid work, but I don’t think we’ll bring back the rigid workday schedule. The last two years have taught us that, while face-to-face and real-time interactions are invaluable, many other tasks can be done just as well, if not better, asynchronously.

Yes, it wasn’t fun to work from a makeshift standing desk in the kitchen while keeping one eye on a freakishly fast toddler. It’s no wonder why some employees have eagerly returned to the ergonomic office stocked with free snacks. But some of us love attending a meeting without sitting in traffic, having lunch without navigating a packed cafeteria, or taking a two-hour afternoon break to compensate for that evening call with Tokyo. You have to accommodate both types—and everyone in between.

Leaders learned the hard way in 2020 that you can’t just flip a switch and change the way a business is run. You have to stay ready with workplace technology that can support various—and changing—work models.

Flexibility, supported with a solid digital foundation, is no longer a choice. Clearly communicate what your employees need to deliver and let them decide where, when, and how. Or you can try to force a rigid work model and watch your talent flock to another employer.

AI and human intelligence aren’t mutually exclusive. They work best when they work together.

Automate the mundane

Automation has freed employees from many repetitive tasks, making work more fulfilling and creative. The digitization of work can go a step further by tapping artificial intelligence that effectively sorts through massive amounts of data and makes prescriptive recommendations. AI can even be used to make it easier for employees to be promoted internally—a huge factor in retaining and rewarding your workforce.

There’s a misconception that AI is designed to replace human workers. But for me, artificial intelligence is actually about the interface between people and machines, making lives more interesting by automating the mundane, removing friction, and presenting the right information and insights.

Better together

Knowledge workers thrive when they can harness technology to make more effective decisions. These decisions aren’t only reactive but also proactive—something that AI enables through its predictive power, which can anticipate and adjust to a world full of constantly changing variables.

When it comes to digital transformation, we think of how it impacts the bottom line by improving speed and efficiency. But how do we improve speed and efficiency? By empowering our talent with the delightful and intuitive experiences they deserve.

AI and human intelligence aren’t mutually exclusive. They work best when they work together.

Dave Wright is ServiceNow’s chief innovation officer and acts as an evangelist for how to improve workplace productivity. He has worked with thousands of

Source: AI And The Secret To Employee Happiness

.

More contents:

What is a Digital Transformation Strategy? »

What is a Digital Business? »

How to make a Digital Transformation Strategy? »

Digital Transformation Strategy in 2020 »

Where to Start with a Digital Transformation Strategy »

Who should be involved in creating a Digital Transformation Strategy? »

What happens to businesses that don’t have a Digital Transformation Strategy? »

What are the top 5 Digital Transformation Strategy Frameworks?

How do I measure if my Digital Transformation Strategy is working? »

What is Digital Transformation?

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